#1
hey UG,

I want to build a Zvex Wooly Mammoth clone, but I am 16 years old and have NO IDEA how to read a schematic. And obviously before I get into this I want to learn how to read it.

How would I read this? What does everything mean? What should I get?



Thanks
Last edited by SupahStrat at Jun 24, 2011,
#2
Probably best to just buy a real one then. If you have no knowledge of wiring then you shouldn't try and start on one that even looking at confuses you let alone parts ect.
Trust me, save yourself the hassle and get the real deal. At least you get a guarantee with that.
Gotta Love Rock N Roll
#5
^that is your best bet to have a working one but if you want a challenge
I guess youll never learn if you dont try(btw dont use your age as an excuse for ignorance at your age i had built a couple of these already)

anyway heres a linkyou ought to read
http://artsites.ucsc.edu/EMS/music/tech_background/schematics/ReadSchem.html

if you have no experience soldering learn how to do it and do it well BEFORE starting

if you want to get serious
this website really helped me out when i was startgin
http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_1/chpt_1/1.html
Last edited by supersac at Jun 24, 2011,
#6
what are the 2 black lines between the wires? Shouldn't it be one black and one white? Also, are the black lines at the end of each wire Ground symbols?
#7
your first issue is that different schematics use different symbols for the same things, the second issue is that the schematic gives very little idea of how it puts together in the box.

First off, google is your friend, there's plenty of descriptions of the symbols and beginner electronics sites about.

But just a quick reference guide for your schematic



all the thick lines at the bottom are earth, a single point for grounding basically.

As a note, your schematic doesn't include true bypass or on/off in it anywhere.
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#8
Quote by SupahStrat
what are the 2 black lines between the wires? Shouldn't it be one black and one white? Also, are the black lines at the end of each wire Ground symbols?


I think your referring to capacitors, and they're only one black one white if its polarised the two black ones don't care which direction the current is travelling in

EDIT: Bed time for me, if your still struggling when I get up tomorrow I'll write you up a good starters tutorial, it's on my list of things to do anyway
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
TC Electronic Trinity Reverb
Last edited by GABarrie at Jun 24, 2011,
#10
Possibly one of the easiest circuits to start with, a good choice by accident :p I built a ts808 clone, which wasn't as easy as I had hoped so you're off to a better start than me.

Google "true bypass schematic" if you wanna see how to put one in
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
TC Electronic Trinity Reverb
#11
Quote by supersac
(btw dont use your age as an excuse for ignorance at your age i had built a couple of these already)


Its a very valid excuse since most people don't get into electronics until much later now. A lot of my friends are in their early 20s now and are just getting into stuff that I have been working on forever.

Also, the circuit is indeed true bypass.

To the OP,
http://www.kpsec.freeuk.com/symbol.htm

That is a great site for what the actual symbols mean.

The single black lines at the end of the wires is indeed a ground point.

You will see some boxes with numbers in them. Next to the boxes is usually R#, that essentially means it is resistor #. Its what we use to keep track of what goes where on PCBs and layouts. So in the box you see something like 100k. That means you need a 100 kohm resistor. For pedals 1/4W will easily work.

The boxes with an arrow through them are potentiometers, these are what you use to adjust the circuit.

Then you have the two thick set of black lines. Those are capacitors. Non polarized capacitors. If you look you will see C#, again a reference to keep everything organized. Below the cap you will see something like 220n. That means you need a 220nanofarad cap. For this project 25V caps or higher will easily work. I would try to stay with lower voltages to keep everything from being extremely large.

You also see a a black/white line on some of the components. These are polarized capacitors. Same for finding the value. 25V+ will work again. The white line designates the POSITIVE terminal. A lot of these caps will have a arrow pointing to one lead is negative. The caps are pretty self explanatory.

The input and output jacks are pretty easy to see, and should be self explanatory. I would buy two Stereo jacks, since one of them needs to be stereo. Not much of an increase in price. You will also need a 9V battery snap.

The switch is broken into two parts, SW1a and SW1b. This means you need a DPDT stomp switch, or a 3PDT switch if you want to have an LED. This circuit is already True Bypass, so this means that whenever the circuit is off nothing will flow through the circuitry.

There are two other symbols we have not talked about yet. Those are transistors, labeled Q1 and Q2. These are actually Bipolar Junction Transistors. The schematic says 2N3904 should work, and I don't see why they wouldn't. So you need two of those.

If you want to understand what is going on I would recommend reading the following three "books". Its one thing to be able to put something together from a schematic, but having an idea of how the thing actually works goes a long way to helping you trouble shoot and what not.

http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_1/index.html
http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_2/index.html
http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_3/index.html

The problem you will likely run into is that there is no layout given for this, and it is very difficult to go from schematic to layout at first for a lot of people.

I'll let you digest all of this so that you can ask more questions if you need to. I'm usually a lot busier than I am right now, but I've had some down time and decided to come back and try to help some people out.
#12
Quote by XgamerGt04
Also, the circuit is indeed true bypass

So it is, ignore me then, I blame it on my daughter having me up since 5am, lostmy ability to read schematics.

Aside from that, xgamer has covered most of the bases.

Be prepared for it to take a while, learning this stuff takes time and takes research, don't be afraid to ask questions, people round here are very helpful, but don't expect them to spoonfeed you either, make sure to look things up, as previously stated... Google is your friend!
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
TC Electronic Trinity Reverb
#14
That will give you layout, the horizontal orange stripes are copper strips on strip board (handy stuff to learn on btw) and everything along that line is connected. Read it alongside the schematic to try and understand how the schematic actually relates to a physical layout

EDIT: The red squares denote a break in the strip so the whole line isn't connected
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
TC Electronic Trinity Reverb
Last edited by GABarrie at Jun 24, 2011,
#16
Quote by SupahStrat
can I make this pedal using a homemade PCB? instead or stripboard?



Yes you can. See link in my sig and check the links in there as well.
And PAY ATTENTION to the safety issues I mention.
But I would highly recommend learning to read schematics first.
#17
Thanks for asking these questions TS, I have had my own curiosities in these matters, and I am of the same age you are. Have confidence knowing that you are not alone in your educational endeavors!

The links people have posted here are pure gold for beginners, especially the "all about circuits" book!
Anxiously Anticipating An Attractive ADA-MP1 Addition!