#1
Listen, I know everyone is different but I'm looking for some kinda framework to start with.

I'm looking to shred it up, but I've been a rhythm player for years. I've played out lots but I've never done much soloing only a little bit and I'm wondering what practice routines others use to get the art of soloing down.
How much theory ( I do know a lot of the basics) and how much learning others' solos etc.. I know this question is a little broad based but damn its taking forever to get somewhere. I need input on other peoples routine see if there is something missing in my routine.
#2
Definitely keep learning other peoples' solos a lot. But don't just learn how to play them, disect them and try to figure out what scales they use and different techniques they use. A lot of that will come naturally if you just keep learning them.

As far as theory, it kind of depends on what kind of guitarist you are. I know a decent amount of theory but I'm definitely no guru. But I have no problem writing solos because I can usually sound out what I want to play. But learning theory definitely can't hurt. A huge part in improving in your overall guitar playing is just playing with other talented guitarists. Try to learn from them and take what you can from their playing
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#3
Learn scales and be able to play them up and down the neck. Learn where every note is. If you feel like playing an Eb, you should be able to find it up and down the neck. It really helps. Admittedly I'm not a fantastic guitar player in any sense. You're probably better than I am, but that really is something important to know. Learn intervals too. You don't want to be trying to play very melodically then play a tritone not knowing how dissonant it can be. It won't ever hurt you to know all this.
#4
Here's a general list of stuff i practice, you can take what you like from it:

Practice your scales in every key - pentatonic, major, harmonic minor, melodic minor, etc
Pentatonic will be easiest for you to learn and jam with as all the notes are pretty forgiving.

Work on learning where all your notes are by name. It seems daunting at first but they will come the more you work at it.

Know how the different notes and degrees of the scales you are using sound against different chords. This will allow you to figure out essentially what notes sound good in certain situations. This can be done easily by making up some backing tracks with simple progressions (or just go on youtube, there are some really good ones there)

Improvise. Yeah, you won't sound amazing at first but that's why this is practice. Again, find some of those backing tracks or make them yourself and just play. Try to feel the notes that need to come next, your ear for lead playing will improve greatly by doing so.

Finally, work on your technical proficiency. Practice all kinds of techniques, the more you know how to do the wider variety of stuff you can not only play but write. Include everything from bends, slides, tapping, legato, alternate picking, economy/sweep picking etc...

Here is a link that I think you will benefit greatly from if you want to learn scales and arpeggios, even chords.

clicky

Hope this helps man, happy shredding
#5
10+ hours a day with all techniques. You're doing it wrong if it's any less. By my second year I was doing Loomis stuff, so obviously 10 hours a day does work when you do it right.

Don't let any other moron tell you otherwise.
#6
I dont believe 10+ hours a day is the only way to go per se =P BUT it cant hurt I did 8 hours a day for a year, then started playing leads in bands =).
but definitely listen to zeppelin addict.
#7
Quote by matt200710
I dont believe 10+ hours a day is the only way to go per se =P BUT it cant hurt I did 8 hours a day for a year, then started playing leads in bands =).
but definitely listen to zeppelin addict.


8 hours is still a sexy amount of time =)
Vehry naihce.
#8
Quote by ElitiusMaxim
8 hours is still a sexy amount of time =)
Vehry naihce.

sorry I didnt mean its "not" the way to go, I more meant, its not for everybody, some people will get burnt out. and my adhd prevents perfect practice, so I had to give more time to make up XD. but to each there own as with all things =).
#9
don't have one. make lists of things to do day to day or week to week, but don't have a regimen. guitar is not lifting weights, and repetitive, route practice will only make you worse. moreover, many regimens which liken practicing guitar to excersize, are written by ****ing idiots---when you seriously play a sport, you find you rarely go over the same things in the same order every day--rather each practice is comprised of learning new skills, combining them with old skills, warming up, cooling down, physical conditioning (which is rarely the same thing each and every day) and actually playing the game. thats how you should practice--be consistent, but maybe work on a couple songs each day (not running through routely, but working on specific things in specific parts), some excersizes--which should not only give you physical facility, but fretboard knowledge, and they should re-enforce theory concepts and strengthen your aural skills. what i'd practice to get better at playing leads
play other peoples solos
practicing the blues, major, and harmonic and (real) melodic minor scale, through all twelve keys
play songs
play rhythm guitar (not that theirs really a distinction)
do timing drills with a metronome
practice soloing over songs you want to play
learning solos by ear
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#10
Thanks for the advice, some of your suggestions I've been doing (sweeping practice,drilling scales, with a metronome etc.) But I also got some good ideas on intervals and other things from you guys. One other thought. Should you learn one scale in all its positions and then move on to the next or learn all the keys in their first position and expand them? Any thoughts?
#11
Quote by pushingthrough
Listen, I know everyone is different but I'm looking for some kinda framework to start with.

I'm looking to shred it up, but I've been a rhythm player for years. I've played out lots but I've never done much soloing only a little bit and I'm wondering what practice routines others use to get the art of soloing down.
How much theory ( I do know a lot of the basics) and how much learning others' solos etc.. I know this question is a little broad based but damn its taking forever to get somewhere. I need input on other peoples routine see if there is something missing in my routine.



Don't worry about how much.

Learn 1 solo. start there.
shred is gaudy music
#12
Quote by matt200710
I dont believe 10+ hours a day is the only way to go per se =P BUT it cant hurt I did 8 hours a day for a year, then started playing leads in bands =).
but definitely listen to zeppelin addict.

That's definitely a sure fire way to build speed. You can't go wrong playing non stop every day. But there ARE more efficient ways to practice
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#13
Quote by pushingthrough
Thanks for the advice, some of your suggestions I've been doing (sweeping practice,drilling scales, with a metronome etc.) But I also got some good ideas on intervals and other things from you guys. One other thought. Should you learn one scale in all its positions and then move on to the next or learn all the keys in their first position and expand them? Any thoughts?

It all depends how much you wanna learn. I'd start by learning the Major and Natural Minor scales, along with Pentatonic (you might already know all of them) But those are a good start and then just get familiar with all the different positions of them and start to connect them all around the fretboard

Another thing that's extremely helpful especially for metal is learning what sweep shapes work with each chord and scale
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#14
jam to backing tracks, learn music by ear. Iv never made a practice schedule. This is not a job. You do not want to force yourself to play when you dont want to, youll end up losing all motivation.

correct practice. be sure your relaxed and practicing correctly
#15
Quote by QuantumMechanix
That's definitely a sure fire way to build speed. You can't go wrong playing non stop every day. But there ARE more efficient ways to practice



10 hours of perfect practice a day = efficient.

If you spend 10 hours playing the same songs I'd definitely agree though.
#16
Well, first off, learning to play lead doesn't necessarily mean "shredding it up", but anyway, here's what I'd suggest -

Work on your ears - figure out melodies, solos and test your ability to play what you sing and vice versa.

Learn your scales and arpeggios inside out - it's no good if you have to think about it for a second or two, it has to be instant.

As regards improving your chops, check this out - www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1091796

Hope that helped.

Quote by ElitiusMaxim
10+ hours a day with all techniques. You're doing it wrong if it's any less. By my second year I was doing Loomis stuff, so obviously 10 hours a day does work when you do it right.

Don't let any other moron tell you otherwise.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQ-NAgDpRVs&feature=related

My favourite moron! <3

(although obviously more practice is certainly better)
#17
Quote by ElitiusMaxim
10 hours of perfect practice a day = efficient.

If you spend 10 hours playing the same songs I'd definitely agree though.

Well yeah if it's "perfect" practice. What I mean is, if you spend your time focusing on economy of motion and playing to a click track for 2 hours a day you'll probably have better results than if you just noodled around for 10 hours a day. Both will help you improve, but the former is much more efficient
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