#1
Hi all, I am hobbyist guitarist, and I am in my late thirties, I have always played electric and read tab to some extent. About 5 years ago I made my mind to learn to read music, and I have been reading. My frustration comes because I can not read at tempo, actually I am very slow, so I can read scores and memorize them, and have the score to support me, but I can not sightread. I have gone through a book by Sal Salvador, David Oakes, Mel Bay, and now starting a Berklee book. Do you have any advise to improve speed reading. I usually hear that I should use a metronome and increase the tempo which I do already, but it does not always work.

Thank you for your advise.
#2
if you can't sight read at a moderately slow tempo, forget about speed reading. it's like doing speed drills on guitar when you're just learning to fret properly.

if you are at the speed reading level, then yeah, use a metronome. what do you mean, "it doesn't always work"? if you mean that you can't read at those speeds, then it's exactly what i said -- focus more on reading techniques than speed.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#4
Quote by ponchete
Hi all, I am hobbyist guitarist, and I am in my late thirties, I have always played electric and read tab to some extent. About 5 years ago I made my mind to learn to read music, and I have been reading. My frustration comes because I can not read at tempo, actually I am very slow, so I can read scores and memorize them, and have the score to support me, but I can not sightread. I have gone through a book by Sal Salvador, David Oakes, Mel Bay, and now starting a Berklee book. Do you have any advise to improve speed reading. I usually hear that I should use a metronome and increase the tempo which I do already, but it does not always work.

Thank you for your advise.


Practice out your ass.
It takes years and years to get it down properly. Took me years and years, but I'm at the point now where I could own Berklee students.
#5
The truth is that I did not master the David Oakes book, I would spend a long time on each page, to a point where I only read them when I know the scores by heart, which is not sightreading. At the end the exercises where very difficult for me, and for instance, I did not learn the Canon by heart because it would have taken me months, so I moved on because I am more of a blues player. When I buy other styles books, like blues, I can listen to the recordings and copy the licks fairly well with tablature, but sight reading has opened me a whole world of possibilities,and even though I am a little frustrated, there are times when I cant hear the rhythm in the tablature and CD, an thanks to the sight reading I can figure out the triplets, etc. by looking at the music. So, overall, I am in a much better place. thank you for your answers, I will keep practicing every day.
#6
Quote by ponchete
The truth is that I did not master the David Oakes book, I would spend a long time on each page, to a point where I only read them when I know the scores by heart, which is not sightreading. At the end the exercises where very difficult for me, and for instance, I did not learn the Canon by heart because it would have taken me months, so I moved on because I am more of a blues player. When I buy other styles books, like blues, I can listen to the recordings and copy the licks fairly well with tablature, but sight reading has opened me a whole world of possibilities,and even though I am a little frustrated, there are times when I cant hear the rhythm in the tablature and CD, an thanks to the sight reading I can figure out the triplets, etc. by looking at the music. So, overall, I am in a much better place. thank you for your answers, I will keep practicing every day.



Memorizing, and making the decision to memorize rather than learn, is why you are where you are now. It takes discipline to learn. Memorizing melodies and pitches is a detour to progress when you sight read.

I know the "dah dah dut dut" may have seemed silly and when you got to pitch melodies and rhythms, it probably was hard to do those two things at once...but those rhythmic subdivisions were all important...that's where the struggle would have built the strength.

Now I understand why you are where you are. You weren't ready to commit to the discipline of sight reading, and to be honest, when the day comes, and you've abandoned your commitment, the reason for why you have the lack of results, is right there.

When you are ready to get serious with sightreading, I'd suggest a return to that book, because you battle isn't with material, it's within. You have so many "you's" struggling for dominance and the one that you feed is the one that wins. David Oakes book is one of the best there is that I've ever seen. I might suggest working through it with a teach who will keep you moving forward and accountable, since self study may be a problem for you, in terms of discipline. That's not a slam at all, there are a lot of people like that. I'm not the worlds most self disciplined guy either, and there are things that I had to buckle down and determine I was ready to learn, or else forever give it up and not fool myself with illusions of improving.

Good luck, respect for coming clean on this. As long as you feel that you are where you need to be...

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jun 25, 2011,