#1
I mean damn, I read bad thinga baout them. I just watched 5 youtube vids trying to learn how to re string them and it all so complicated. I then read how to adjust intonation and its just seems like a headache. I am used to the simple re string and easy intonation fixes of a tune o matic. I still dont even think I learned how to do any of this after spending an hour reading about how to adjust a fr. Anyone here with floyd want to shed some light here?
#2
I hear ya, I just got my first guitar with a floyd. Don't get me wrong they're fun and all, but it's such a head ache if you don't have all the tools for it. For instance I didn't get a floyd arm with mine, and I don't like the strings on it, but I can't change them unless I block off the floyd..... I have nothing to block it with, so I'm just sitting around with a mediocre guitar set up until I can find something.

Over all, if you don't see yourself using a floyd rose then avoid them.
#3
It may seem complicated at first, but when you learn how to use them it is really easy.
Reading about it won't seem to help, you need to get close and practical.
When re-stringing them all you have to know is.........

1. Cut off that "bally point" at the tip.
2. Do not remove all strings at once, Re-string 1 by 1

^^ That's pretty much it.


Hope That Helped
#4
They are definitely harder to set up than a TOM, but it's up to you whether a floyd is worth the setup time or not.

It was hard for me to understand the setups at first, but once you understand it it's not really a problem. Here's the best video I found when I was first learning setups: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RQQT9-Y0R9A

And intonation, it's pretty simple actually. This is what I do. After setting the guitar up see if the intonation is off by the 12th harmonic and 12th fret, say it's sharp when fretted. You loosen the string (quite a bit, your going to need alot of slack) then pull it so it's tight past the nut then lock the nut. You now should have a bunch of slack. You loosen the intonation screw thing then slide it away from the bridge if the intonation is sharp, and towards the bridge if the intonation is flat.

Here is another guide on floyd setups. Imagine that. It's a sticky.
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=614226
#5
Quote by MaddMann274
It may seem complicated at first, but when you learn how to use them it is really easy.
Reading about it won't seem to help, you need to get close and practical.
When re-stringing them all you have to know is.........

1. Cut off that "bally point" at the tip.
2. Do not remove all strings at once, Re-string 1 by 1

^^ That's pretty much it.

=

Hope That Helped


What about intonation?
#6
Quote by Zerox8610
I hear ya, I just got my first guitar with a floyd. Don't get me wrong they're fun and all, but it's such a head ache if you don't have all the tools for it. For instance I didn't get a floyd arm with mine, and I don't like the strings on it, but I can't change them unless I block off the floyd..... I have nothing to block it with, so I'm just sitting around with a mediocre guitar set up until I can find something.

Over all, if you don't see yourself using a floyd rose then avoid them.


Undo the back plate and block it there with some wood or similar item that would fit.
#7
Quote by hoosierxhoosier
What about intonation?


Well, I really don't know because I didn't have to do it, It was perfect when I bought it (Guitar).
#8
Quote by MaddMann274
It may seem complicated at first, but when you learn how to use them it is really easy.
Reading about it won't seem to help, you need to get close and practical.
When re-stringing them all you have to know is.........

1. Cut off that "bally point" at the tip.
2. Do not remove all strings at once, Re-string 1 by 1

^^ That's pretty much it.


Hope That Helped


He forgot one thing you have to use the same gauge and same brand of strings.

Quote by hoosierxhoosier
What about intonation?


See above intonation isn't a big deal for a routine string change.

This is the thing most people forget any time you change string gauges. You'll need to do a setup if you have any type multiple spring tremolo...

It doesn't matter if it's a Floyd, a Wilkinson (two point with locking tuners) or a vintage strat style (six screws non locking tuners)

IMHO people make a way bigger deal about changing strings on Floyd than they need to.
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#9
People massively overblown the difficulty of Floyd roses. All it is really is simple physics. Balancing string tension vs spring tension. Middle school concepts. Theres some really helpful info in the FR setup sticky though.
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#10
i swap gauges and string companies all the time and get 0% difficulty, i mainly float around 9-11s or hybrid 10's make sure your springs are quality high tension springs, a lot of stock compaines really cheap out on these, Ibanez edge 3 im looking at you.
my epiphone explorer stays in tune 100% of the time, and handles dives e.t.c thats a liscenced, and after a spring change, my edge 3 has zero difficulty,.

As for restringing floyd roses, once you do them once or twice , its simple as.
#11
So...


When getting a guitar with a floyd, if you use gauge 9's, do you STILL have to set it up first?

How do you set it up if you want to change strings?
#12
Quote by hoosierxhoosier
So...


When getting a guitar with a floyd, if you use gauge 9's, do you STILL have to set it up first?

How do you set it up if you want to change strings?


When getting a "new" guitar, it's always a good idea to check out it's set-up period. Check the neck relief, the action, its intonation, pickup heights and with a Floyd whether it's correctly leveled. If you're a newbie, then take it to a store and get them to do the initial set-up, and they can also check it out for any defects too. As you get more experienced you can do this yourself.

When you change your string gauge or tuning you should recheck the set-up (neck relief can be more or less depending on string tension, action may need to be set higher or lower, intonation may need a slight adjustment pickups might need a small drop or raise). The only difference with a Floyd is you need to check whether your bridge is still parallel with the body, which is dependent on your overall string tension.

It's not that difficult. All of the above are on various stickies at the top of this forum.