#1
I need help understanding chord tone soloing i can solo well enough in the minor pentatonic but i want to make my playing more emotional. Does the 2nd solo of comfortably numb have chord tone soloing in it?
#2
The first one does. For sure. The second one is a lot of blues scale stuff, and sure there are sustained notes over chord tones, but I'd say the opening solo is definitely chord tone based. Not long ago I walked someone through a note for note analysis of that solo.

So you want to chord tone solo, and be able to apply your ideas with intelligence and understanding?

You have to know what the notes in the chords you are playing. I'd suggest a study of music theory. If that's not an option and you want to fake it, I'd suggest learning arpeggios and the notes of triads and then learn to find them on the neck when you are playing. I suspect this will not happen over night for you.

Best,

Sean
#3
Quote by bad news bear
I need help understanding chord tone soloing i can solo well enough in the minor pentatonic but i want to make my playing more emotional. Does the 2nd solo of comfortably numb have chord tone soloing in it?


There really is no such thing is "chord tone" soloing... at least not in the way you imply. There are common melodic practices which would of-course use chord tones AND non chord tones..... most music utilizes this concept, and comfortably numb is no exception.

"chord tone soloing" is a marketed term. (like "chord theory, guitar theory).
it's not an approach to playing solos. There are however exercises that would have you play chord tones of a chord progression (which is probably where the term originated). This can be very helpful, but again, it's not an actual approach to soloing. When you play a solo, you would rarely play all chord tones.... instead you would follow common melodic practices, and play musically.


PS, if you want to play more emotionally.... play more emotionally. Practicing "chord tone solos" as an exercise will help you in certain areas, but not emotion. You either feel that or you don't.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 25, 2011,
#4
Is it just highlighting the notes from the chord in the scale. so in a C chord i could highlight C,E,and G in the minor pentatonic always ending and starting on those notes and sort of highlighting them?
#5
Chord Tone soloing is using the tones of the chord in your solos. So if you're playing over a C major you could use CEG. Then if you go over a Dm chord you could use DFA.
its just using the notes of the chord.
I suggest learning arpeggios all over the neck
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#6
Quote by Metallicuh
Chord Tone soloing is using the tones of the chord in your solos. So if you're playing over a C major you could use CEG. Then if you go over a Dm chord you could use DFA.
its just using the notes of the chord.
I suggest learning arpeggios all over the neck



Well, It's important to point out that "chord tone soloing" is an exercise, not a method for soloing as the name implies. Actual melodies/solos are rarely made of up chord tones exclusively.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 25, 2011,
#7
Quote by GuitarMunky
Actual melodies/solos are rarely made of up chord tones exclusively.


And if they were, they'd be frightfully boring. Imagine a melody or solo that's perfectly consonant from start to end. Yeuch!
#8
It really depends on the tempo of the song and the harmony of the song. GENERALLY, the more you use chord tones and solo using notes from the harmony, the better your leads are going to sound, but you don't always have to do that really. But you are probably better off just letting your ears guide you as to what notes to use and how to phrase because if I keep thinking about chord tones I find that it distracts by ability to concentrate oh phrasing and stuff like that. But I suppose if you really know theory like the back of your hand it is possible to use in conjunction with trying to think of how to phrase and stuff. Just requires a lot more work.
Last edited by Appetite_4_GNR at Jun 26, 2011,