#1
Just wondering, how fast do you think one of us guitarist need to play before someone would say "WOW, he/she is really fast!" what would you consider it ?
#2
I would consider not getting hung up on speed and work on accuracy. Speed will come.
#6
I don't get these threads...

what is the point of this, are you really one of these guys who plays guitar to impress people?

I mean, music is about expressing, not showing off your skills.

For instance, sweep picking, its a very hard technique but lucky for me i will never learn it.
Why? because I think sweep picking has a terrible sound (speed metal like), something i will never use to express myself (i like dark sounds, which sweep picking, for me is totally not dark/melancholic).

On the other hand, fast tremolo picking gives me that eerie sound i'm looking for, so I'm a master at tremolo picking.

etc...

people who play music to impress people will always be bad muscians (that doesnt mean they won't get away with it, but still)
Last edited by Larz89 at Jun 25, 2011,
#7
Quote by macashmack
Just wondering, how fast do you think one of us guitarist need to play before someone would say "WOW, he/she is really fast!" what would you consider it ?

It doesn't matter because most of those people will be regular dickweeds that think A7X is god's gift to metal or that Slipknot is teh most br00tal band evar.
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#8
Quote by macashmack
Just wondering, how fast do you think one of us guitarist need to play before someone would say "WOW, he/she is really fast!" what would you consider it ?

Speed doesn't matter. I can play sweeps as sixteenth triplets at 180bpm. It wouldn't be clean, but it would be fast. Consequently, it would be noise. See, most people don't think in terms of fast = good. That's a concept promoted and perpetuated by people who write immature music which focuses on bursts of meaningless technicality.

Personally, I'll take a guitarist who plays good melody cleanly over a guy who plays ultra-fast without melody or context. Hence why I prefer David Gilmour over Rusty Cooley. Now, there is a time and place for speed and shows of raw technical skill, but it's not always here and now. Most people would agree with me - melody is much more important than speed. That's why more people like the solos in Comfortably Numb more than the ones in Outworld.

The moral of the story: most people don't like pure speed without context. Hence, if you're playing to impress, play what they want to hear: a solo that works in context.
#10
Honestly, I am very impressed by fast players (I can't play fast, myself). For me, I consider something fast at, say, 16th notes at 130; but note this: the arepeggio section of Eugene's trick back is in 16ths at only 130bpm, but it sounds quite fast because of the complexity and because it is all alternate picked. Even the rest of the song is played at only 140 or 145bpm, I think...and it sounds plenty fast, at least to my ears.

I think that if you can play 16ths at about 120bpm, you'll impress the average non-guitarist, but to impress other shredders, you will have to 1) either play faster than them, or 2) play a simple 3 chord folk song and sing around a campfire or at a party--the guy with the acoustic singing will 98% always get the girl, before the guy noodling scales up and down the fretboard.
#11
When it sounds fast to me.

Sometimes someone just NAILS something and it sounds so slick and slippery that it's impressive - and the opposite is grinding horrible exercises at incredible tempos, where it doesn't really seem fast until it's ridiculously fast.
#12
Quote by afrika18
or 2.) play a simple 3 chord folk song and sing around a campfire or at a party--the guy with the acoustic singing will 98% always get the girl, before the guy noodling scales up and down the fretboard.

You know why? Because most listeners are more impressed by musicianship over technical skill. That 3 chord folk song is going to be much more musical and much more digestible than a million chords and crazy fukken shredding. Ignoring women (because they don't make any sense at all and are really a free radical in this thought experiment :p), a song is much more musical and pleasing than scales.

Like I said, if you're playing to impress people, you're better off learning songs they like as opposed to learning to play rapidly. Being able to bust out a fast run is nice, but most people are much more interested in hearing a song that is familiar to them than a guy running through little more than exercises. It's the same reason more people watch movies with a plot to them than exercise videos for entertainment (although there is a major creepiness factor to consider in this example).
#14
Thank you all.
I do not like metal. I do not like fast runs. I enjoy playing acoustic guitar as much (Maybe even more) than playing electric, and i defenatly DO NOT play to impress people. I don't even really like people, they are very confusing. This was simply a question to find an answer that i wanted to hear other guitarists oppinions about.
Thank you again
#15
Well i can see this being a very controversial thread..

Oh wait i'm too late ):
#16
Quote by macashmack
Thank you all.
I do not like metal. I do not like fast runs. I enjoy playing acoustic guitar as much (Maybe even more) than playing electric, and i defenatly DO NOT play to impress people. I don't even really like people, they are very confusing. This was simply a question to find an answer that i wanted to hear other guitarists oppinions about.
Thank you again

When you ask what amounts to "How fast do I have to play to impress people with my speed?", people will think you're out to impress people.

Now, before I leave this thread, never to return again (until there's a new reply :P), keep in min that fast runs aren't exclusively the estate of metal players or even electric guitars. A guy named Ali di Meola (I think I spelled that kind of correctly) is an absolute monster on an acoustic guitar. Crazy, crazy player, but very tasteful. Essentially everything I outlined in my posts.
#17
Your fingers must not be individually visible- they must be a blur of flesh

The minds of all who hear you must be temporarily turned to mush if they listen for more than 90 seconds. This can be both a good thing and a bad thing.

You need to replace your fretboard after each gig because the old one is worn out

You must avoid mirrors at all costs, lest you become permanently transfixed
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It's the same as all other harmony. Surround yourself with skulls and candles if it helps.
#19
I like Kirk Hammett, in fact, I think his solo in Sad but True is one of the all-time greatest solos, but he's not a shredder, unless there's something out there that I missed
#20
Quote by Larz89
For instance, sweep picking, its a very hard technique but lucky for me i will never learn it.
Why? because I think sweep picking has a terrible sound (speed metal like), something i will never use to express myself (i like dark sounds, which sweep picking, for me is totally not dark/melancholic).

On the other hand, fast tremolo picking gives me that eerie sound i'm looking for, so I'm a master at tremolo picking.



From my point of view, I'd like to learn as much techinical stuff as possible I guess with mindless exercises(I'm a decent sweep picker) and discover where it fits into my "normal" playing, but you can't let your exercises leak into your writing and soloing. It honestly depends on how you use your techniques. A short burst of one or to sweeps is gong to sound way more awesome than a huge 2 bar burst of it, if you nail the music just right.

Either way does this sound dark or melancholic?


I'm not trying to pick on you or insult you, just broaden your horizons on what can do what.

I wrote this in 10 minutes so do not hate.

Edit: Totally forgot to attach my file, lol
Attachments:
Darkness.gp5
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Last edited by The Buttmonkey at Jun 27, 2011,
#21
if you still have fingers after you're done, you're not playing fast enough. end of story.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#22
Quote by The Buttmonkey
From my point of view, I'd like to learn as much techinical stuff as possible I guess with mindless exercises(I'm a decent sweep picker) and discover where it fits into my "normal" playing, but you can't let your exercises leak into your writing and soloing. It honestly depends on how you use your techniques. A short burst of one or to sweeps is gong to sound way more awesome than a huge 2 bar burst of it, if you nail the music just right.

Either way does this sound dark or melancholic?


I'm not trying to pick on you or insult you, just broaden your horizons on what can do what.

I wrote this in 10 minutes so do not hate.

Edit: Totally forgot to attach my file, lol


I get your point of view and I agree, broading your horizons is always a good idea (you never know when you can use a technique in a more unconventional way).

But in my example I was refering to the extremely fast (and relatively long) sweep picking, and that is something I think I will not use to express myself, so hence I will not spend months of my time learning it when i could learn something more down to earth for me.

Like in your example (which sounds pretty cool btw ) your eerie sounds are much slower then the "standard" sweep picking (You can't make it super fast all the time or the dark atmosphere will be gone and it will sound like a steve-vai piece).

For me your piece of music is what i would call a (fast) arpeggio (and arpegging chords can get you some evil stuff indeed, if you don' play it super fast :p)

Well thats my view of it.
Last edited by Larz89 at Jun 28, 2011,