#1
Hey there guys.

I have a 7 string that I love dearly, but the neck is just sliiiightly twisted near the top, just enough to where a truss rod adjustment does **** all for me, and my frets begin to buzz after about the 14th on all strings. And theres a slight microphonic buzz all along the neck on the B and E, just slight.

How do I fix a twisted neck?

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
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#2
This probably isn't the proper way (so at your own risk!) but heavy gauge strings tuned tight on the side that needs twisting back? Like I said though, I don't know how its actually done, this is just an idea, one thats probably wrong.
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Last edited by Speckled_Hen at Jun 25, 2011,
#3
I've never done such severe work but I think generally you would pull the frets and reprofile the fretboard. Or maybe keep the frets on and file them so they're uniform again.
#4
the reason the neck is twisting is because your neck is warped. this happens when the maker of your guitar did not let the wood cure properly. there is not a real way to fix it, except a full neck replacement.
#5
Quote by ELLIOTT_ANGELA
the reason the neck is twisting is because your neck is warped.


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#6
The only real permenant solution that i know of is to steam the neck and force the neck straight. The steam will make the wood flex and the glue that attaches the fingerboard to soften, allowing the fingerboard to reinforce the straightening of the neck. When the steam is removed and the heat taken off, allow the glue for the fingerboard to reset and the neck to flex back into the correct shape and release the clamps.

This is a difficult technique to accomplish though and i'm far from an expert.
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#7
Quote by eddiehimself
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And this years uselessness award goes to.....
#9
Just strong arm it back to normal, like a real man.
(DISCLAMER: MIGHT CAUSE EVEN MORE HARM TO YOUR GUITAR)
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#10
Correctly bending metal is an ancient but well documented art-form/trade that most people don't understand. (Have you hugged your blacksmith today?) Bending wood requires alchemy or witchcraft, and the techniques are not nearly as well documented. However, the guitar is useless without a repair, so no harm in trying, right? If its not something that your interest level supports, its hard to justify a lot of research and practice. The time and effort could be spent on finding a replacement neck.
#11
Quote by ethan_hanus
I agree with the above, either replace the neck or do that steam technique, which would prolly cost more than the guitars worth.


I would try adjusting the action to compensate for the twisting.


This guitar was only 200 bucks, but I love the feel of the neck. I'm willing to do what I need to do in order to fix it. I can jerry-rig a steaming device, that won't be a problem.

Besides, a new neck is out of the question at the moment.

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance

#12
Yeah pretty much what you do with the steaming is jig the neck up so it's held straight (untwisted). Then you apply heat and steam. The idea is it softens the fretboard glues and when you let it cool in the jig the glues harden again and the fretboard holds the neck in the correct position and it's all good! That's the theory, I've never done it.