#1
I don't usually get that much time to sing but when I do my practice routine is me singing scales all the way to the highest of my range.
I've also been singing alot of songs that I like.
But on the scale I do some soft palate opening too.
I also do breathing exercises daily.
I've been doing this for a good 3-4 weeks now.
My goal is to sing on the level of the beatles. which could take a while though.
So, what do you guys think?
Quote by kaptkegan
Don't think I've ever been sigged.


I pretty much never leave the drug thread anymore.
#3
It's about as good as it can be without formal lessons.

I will say one thing though. Breathing exercises are all well and good and scales are important too, especially for a good solid warm up, but I always feel that the emphasis should be on actual songs. It's the same as learning guitar, exercises are important for correct technique but learning actual songs (and writing them too!) is just as important for developing your own style and feel for the instrument.

So i guess my suggestion would be sing loads of songs, and most importantly, sing them into a microphone and record them if you can. There are lots of little things you can pick up on this way that you'd never notice just singing along to your favourite song in the car.
#4
whats most important is that you develop proper technique. So Dont sing scales past your comfortable range. You will know when you should stop. prefect your technique you will get higher notes but with ease and over time.

breathing exercises is the first thing you should do when you get outta bed.

http://belcanto.myseriestv.com/showList.php << Great info the videos are mixed up a bit so titles dont match but theres a great breathing exercise near the last few videos i think. But you should watch them all anyway.

soft palate opening? like lift of the throat? or yawning a bit? Thats great

You can also hum to resonate in your sinus cavities better. and smile (mask of the face) to project off your hard palate & back teeth better also.

But it sounds good to me. As long as you stay in your range and say relaxed your doing alright.

www.thebelcantotechnique.com - also see links and resources
#5
Quote by metalmetalhead
whats most important is that you develop proper technique. So Dont sing scales past your comfortable range. You will know when you should stop. prefect your technique you will get higher notes but with ease and over time.

...

But it sounds good to me. As long as you stay in your range and say relaxed your doing alright.

www.thebelcantotechnique.com - also see links and resources


I disagree with this. If you never experiment past what is comfortable for you, you're never going to see much of an improvement in your range. I'm not advocating that you go and scream your lungs out for half an hour at the highest note you can possibly manage, but when you're all nice and loose and warmed up, push yourself a little bit. Try things that are just that little bit beyond you.

Again it's the same thing with learning guitar, you play power chords all day for 20 years, you'll be brilliant at it, but you'll never be able to rip out a solo. You can't expect improvement unless you push your own limits.
#6
Quote by YetAnotherMuso
I disagree with this. If you never experiment past what is comfortable for you, you're never going to see much of an improvement in your range. I'm not advocating that you go and scream your lungs out for half an hour at the highest note you can possibly manage, but when you're all nice and loose and warmed up, push yourself a little bit. Try things that are just that little bit beyond you.

Again it's the same thing with learning guitar, you play power chords all day for 20 years, you'll be brilliant at it, but you'll never be able to rip out a solo. You can't expect improvement unless you push your own limits.


Well sorry you misunderstood. Unless you mean warming up and practicing out of your range is the way to go?

Its not bad to reach for high notes and push your limits. I didnt say it was. But this is not where you want to practice and develop a vocal technique. I find it best to work on vocal quality.

I reach for high notes all the time. But I do not practicing hitting notes, I practice singing. Great singers and good teachers always say stay in your range. Its said for a reason.

Sure push yourself reach for these high notes but do not practice high notes do not stay on high notes. Hurting your voice is like taking one step forward 2 steps back.
#7
Quote by metalmetalhead
Well sorry you misunderstood. Unless you mean warming up and practicing out of your range is the way to go?


No I didn't mean that, warming up out of your range would be pretty silly.

Quote by metalmetalhead
Its not bad to reach for high notes and push your limits. I didnt say it was. But this is not where you want to practice and develop a vocal technique. I find it best to work on vocal quality.


I think this was where my misunderstanding was. You said "don't sing past your comfortable range", so I assumed you meant like, don't do it ever. I agree that 90% of your singing should be grounded in your comfortable range, but there should be a small degree of practicing beyond what is "comfortable", because over time you'll improve and this will become part of your comfort zone.

Quote by metalmetalhead

I reach for high notes all the time. But I do not practicing hitting notes, I practice singing. Great singers and good teachers always say stay in your range. Its said for a reason.


I apologise if I sound like a douche here, but which great singers and good teachers always say this? Sounds pretty vague to me.

Quote by metalmetalhead
Sure push yourself reach for these high notes but do not practice high notes do not stay on high notes. Hurting your voice is like taking one step forward 2 steps back.


I think we can both agree there's a fine line between the appropriate amount of practicing singing beyond what's comfortable, and doing it to the point of hurting yourself.

Also, not aiming this at you but just wanted to add it in general. I feel you should always be mindful of your vocal health, but not to the point where you're terrified of trying to sing a note you're not entirely sure you can hit. I see so many singers on this forum and in general like that. "don't sing after you've eaten cheese, you might cause permanent damage!" Bottom line, unless you are a total dumbass and repeatedly do something that obviously hurts your voice, you won't end up with any of these extreme vocal issues that pro singers end up with like nodes and so forth. So I guess my main point is just, people shouldn't be afraid to do a bit of experimenting with what their voice can do.
#8
I believe Edward L. Johnson himself mentions how important it is to stay in your range. Type it in google.

I think a singer in general is going to see how far they can go anyway. Theres alot of thing you will just figure out yourself. whatever you like.