#1
so ive been getting into a lot of contemporary piano music. stuff like Ludovico Einaudi. and what interests me is how pianists like him work through things like chord progressions. something that ive found really difficult to try on the guitar (for obvious reasons).

does anyone know of any guitarist that are influenced directly by piano techniques? im not really looking for lap guitar players or shredders like malmsteen.
#3
probably a bit confusing. im not talking about chord theory, but how contemporary pianists play through a progression (singular notes/chords derived from the progression) with the added bonus of an extra hand (playing both treble and bass clef lines)

so im not looking for any guitarist that uses 8 finger tapping or something, but more or less a way to produce a similar sounding style on guitar.

... if that makes sense
#8
I'm not sure if it's what you want, but a few Jazz guitarists like Barney Kessel sometimes play a combination of chords and licks. Check out him doing "Autumn Leaves".

As for playing bass notes, check out fingerstyle guitarists, like old Delta Blues guys. I think that Robert Johnson is a good example of that, seeing that he squeezes out some cool phrases while always playing the bassline, as in "32-20 Blues".

Hope I could help.
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#9
Hey dude awesome! Another Einaudi fan, nice!

I've been heavily influenced by this dude, but I play bass most of the time (a lot of fun to combine with piano stuff). I do know some names in classical guitar music that combine treble/melodic lines together with bass parts. Though this never really matches the milion possibilities on a piano..

Look into this guy:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7fywEr4wjU
#10
Michael Romeo is influenced by piano / synth but not the style that you mentioned.
#13
Quote by jsync
probably a bit confusing. im not talking about chord theory, but how contemporary pianists play through a progression (singular notes/chords derived from the progression) with the added bonus of an extra hand (playing both treble and bass clef lines)

so im not looking for any guitarist that uses 8 finger tapping or something, but more or less a way to produce a similar sounding style on guitar.

... if that makes sense


It does make sense but you're forgetting one thing: guitar is restricted to 6 (or 7 or 8 depending on the guitar) notes at once. If a pianist really wanted to they could have every single note available to them ringing at once, although it would sound horrible.

Really, classical guitar techniques are about as good as it's going to get but you'll never be able to emulate the exact way pianists play chordal ideas because of the restrictions of the instrument.
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#14
well, maybe Tommy Emmanuel? He plays a bass part and a tune at the same time. It's a pretty difficult technique but it's fun. Look up Windy and Warm. That's probably one of the simplest ones to get down. It still takes a lot more practise than a normal song though. Practise getting the bass part down until it's perfect then put the tune in, like you would a song on a piano.
#15
Stanley Jordan. He was originally a piano player, but then switched to guitar and uses a lot of "piano techniques," plays a lot of jazz and stuff.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GT0Sz6iRUpo

The man is brilliant.

Edit: And to pertain more to your idea of playing a rhythm and lead line at the same time, here he is playing 'Autumn Leaves' on two guitars at once (in this sense, however, people like Tommy Emmanuel is also a great suggestion).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQZY87PDsnQ
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Last edited by BlueGreen at Jun 26, 2011,
#17
Quote by isthisnameused
I think that Robert Johnson is a good example of that, seeing that he squeezes out some cool phrases while always playing the bassline, as in "32-20 Blues".

Hope I could help.



I thought of him, too.

Seeing someone play this tune was really cool, I thought:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETELORdwmJA


The song doesn't start until 2:40 or so, but it's worth it, imo.
Last edited by dustbot at Jun 27, 2011,
#18
I know exactly what your talking about and i've been thinking about it too.

Listen to Jimi Hendrix on Little Wing.

Listening to the intro, he starts every bar by playing the bass note of the chord in question. Then, while it is still ringing, he will play a melody until the next bar which goes on to the bass note of the next chord. He uses this technique to great effect on a number of songs and it really sounds like 3 guitars playing at once.
#19
You're talking about voice leading a melody, is that right? like going through a harmonic progression using both chords and single notes.

Joe Pass and Kessel (as mentioned) are masters of this, but check out a slightly newer generation. Peter Bernstein playing Monk's Pannonica. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hmtndjkuRJU

If that isn't it, then give a more specific example of what it is that you like. Einaudi could be doing anything.