#1
Hi guys,

Downloaded FL Studio 9 a few months ago, I'd used it a few times on my friend's computer and it was the only fully functional DAW I'd really had any experience with. I've found the interface easy enough to work with and haven't had any real problems, but a lot of people seem to bag it out and say "get a real DAW like Cubase" or "it's only good for making electronic music" etc.

Am I missing out on any amazing extra functionality by sticking with FL Studio? I'm quite familliar with it now so i'm reluctant to switch over to a totally new DAW, but as a rock musician is it worth me investigating others such as Reaper?
#2
If you want the best quality possible without going to a professional studio, you'd be better off spending some money on a proper multitrack recorder instead of playing around with computer software. You can get some excellent 2nd hand kit cheaply on ebay.

Software is OK for playing around with, but if you want to do things properly you need to have the proper kit to do it with.
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#3
Reaper is Great!, but it has less features than FL studio.
I think FL studio is great and if it works for you than there is no need to change it.
Software is ok for every thing, no need to a multitrack recorder, also there multitrack recorders has much less future and function than computer software.
Also quality is a non-existing term in today DAWs, all of them are great, the most important part is your ear.
#4
FLStudio is more geared towards electronic music.

as a rock musician, get sonar or something.
#5
Quote by GaryHB
If you want the best quality possible without going to a professional studio, you'd be better off spending some money on a proper multitrack recorder instead of playing around with computer software. You can get some excellent 2nd hand kit cheaply on ebay.

Software is OK for playing around with, but if you want to do things properly you need to have the proper kit to do it with.

Ignore this guy.


Anyway, TS, I've never used FL but I'm told it's much more like the other DAWs now and not just aimed at making loop-based music. If it works well enough for you, then why worry? And you can always try a few free demos of other DAWs if you're worried.
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#6
Quote by GaryHB
If you want the best quality possible without going to a professional studio, you'd be better off spending some money on a proper multitrack recorder instead of playing around with computer software. You can get some excellent 2nd hand kit cheaply on ebay.

Software is OK for playing around with, but if you want to do things properly you need to have the proper kit to do it with.



Thanks, I don't really want the best quality possible, my recording setup is purely for writing and demoing purposes. Also, I don't think I agree, hardware MTRs in home studios are becoming a thing of the past. They're bulky and expensive, and with a half decent firewire interface and a DAW you can do everything an MTR can do and more.


Quote by DisarmGoliath

Anyway, TS, I've never used FL but I'm told it's much more like the other DAWs now and not just aimed at making loop-based music. If it works well enough for you, then why worry? And you can always try a few free demos of other DAWs if you're worried.



Yep, makes sense to me. As far as I can tell, and for my purposes, FL does everything I need it to do. There just seem to be so many people who hate it that I thought perhaps there is a reason.

Thanks for the responses guys!
#7
i used to use FL as my main daw. it was great for what it did, but i found it lacking in a few areas. i havent used any of the versions since 5 though, so they may have changed things up since then to fix the issues.

the two biggest problems i had were:
recording didnt make sense and wasnt intuitive
tempo/time signature changes in a project didnt work well from an editing standpoint.

i thought the interface was easy to use, the midi editor was well laid out and a lot of the things it did just made sense to me. some people who i worked with it on didnt find it as user friendly, which is maybe what people dont like it.

but if theyve fixed the tempo change issue and the way to record in it makes sense to you, then there really isnt a reason to switch. it is a good DAW that does very well at many things.
#8
hardware MTRs in home studios are becoming a thing of the past


Can't agree with that. I know of at least half a dozen people who've completely lost all their work when the PC they were using got a virus, and they've also found that they've had to spend loads of money on upgraded soundcards, USB converters etc. My 16 track has all the connections I need built in and I've never lost any data.

with a half decent firewire interface and a DAW you can do everything an MTR can do and more


My experience doesn't agree with this either, I've had a couple of friends borrow my multitracker to record on when they reached a problem that their software couldn't resolve even though it only needed some of the basic functions of my digital multitracker. (Not sure what software they were using though).

Also, with my multitracker I can record enough tracks at once to use it to record a full band live in concert and mix it down to create a live demo CD. I've never seen any software that can do that.

Software does has it's advantages, like unlimited tracks & less bulky equipment, but it has a lot of drawbacks as well. Can't comment on any extra things you may be able to do with it, I'm sure there are features of software which multitrackers don't have an answer for, but the ultimate argument leads to the point where you end up using software to create the whole composition and stop playing actual instruments altogether.....there is software out there that can replace the whole band.

And finally:
Ignore this guy.


If you're not going to post a sensible comment, don't bother posting. I don't mind people disagreeing and putting forward a response which supports and justifies their point of view stating what they see as the primary weakness of the post they are replying to and how their point of view resolves these weaknesses. Unfortunately with that post all you have succeeded in doing is proving you don't have the intelligence to put forward a fully reasoned argument in this manner, thereby discrediting your own point of view.
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#9
like others have said, FL is more aimed towards electronic music, alot of people think of it as just a bit of a toy aswell, in the same way that they do with programs like garageband and acid.

i for one, i don't actually dislike FL studio, it's very easy to use, and when used right, can do a hell of alot. it comes with tonnes of samples, and instruments as standard, some of which are great, some are terrible, but i can forgive that. it's by no means the best, but it has it's uses.

i've used FL to host VST instruments for a long time, then exporting individual tracks as wav files, so i can manipulate them in the daw's i use (mainly adobe audition 3, or cubase) because there's something iffy with my computer where for some reason, it uses alot less CPU to run a VSTi in FL than it does either of those programs, i guess the programs themselves just use alot more CPU. so running them in the program i'm recording into and mixing isn't an option.
I deeply regret the 6661 in my username. Siiiigh. Damn you, 14 year old me, you edgy little bastard.
#10
Quote by GaryHB

My experience doesn't agree with this either, I've had a couple of friends borrow my multitracker to record on when they reached a problem that their software couldn't resolve even though it only needed some of the basic functions of my digital multitracker. (Not sure what software they were using though).

the thing is, in the past decade software based recording has completely overtaken multi-trackers for most applications. you can buy an interface with 8 mic preamps for around $500, and it has everything you need for connectivity to a computer. then any decent DAW is going to be able to do anything a full hardware unit can, and much more. most people start recording with a program like audacity, which is a horrid example of good recording software. there may be a steeper learning curve for some things, which can frustrate people to the point where they give up and dont bother to learn the software enough to use it well. i dont know what functions your friends couldnt find, but chances are, with any half decent DAW those functions are there.


Quote by GaryHB

Also, with my multitracker I can record enough tracks at once to use it to record a full band live in concert and mix it down to create a live demo CD. I've never seen any software that can do that.

Again, there are plenty of interfaces with 8 (or more) mic inputs, which allows for most full bands to record what they need. many interfaces allow you to chain them as well, which means many more available inputs. most software will allow you to use a large number of simultaneous inputs, many even allow for more than 16 tracks. at some point you become much more limited by the computer than you do by the interfaces or the software.

i will say that stand alone units do have advantages. they are typically more portable than a computer based setup. they also allow for a more hands on type of mixing approach, which for a software setup requires an extra control surface. however to say that a hardware multi track unit is going to be more professional, higher quality or more versitile is simply mis-informed with the current state of things.
#11
The later versions of FL have better recording support. Time changes are still terrible to work with, though. I had it from when I was into electronic music and I can't shell out for anything else, so it works for me. If you don't already have it, check out others...
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#12
you can buy an interface with 8 mic preamps for around $500


That's already more than I paid for my multitracker (so what if it was 2nd hand) and you haven't even bought the software or the PC & any other upgrades you'd need yet.....
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#13
I use fruity loops, it's excellent.

However the only issue that I haven't resolved is the tempo change. It's pretty weird to record a song with a lot of tempo changes, for some reasons the program won't handle it

( unless someone found a solution and is willing to share )
The symphonizer
#14
FL Studio has a bad rep for its past. To be honest its a great DAW these days. It use to be a little sketch but I use it on everything from hip hop to metal to electronic to country to rock. I have recorded all live instruments with it as well. I switched from Cubase to FL actually. I have used FL, Cubase, Sonar, and Adobe Audition very in depth and prefer FL over all of them. The thing with DAWs is it comes out what works best for you. FL is set up perfect for me, it fits my workflow and can do everything all other DAWs can, and I like it so I chose it.

All DAWs once you get past Audacity are pretty equal and you just need to find what works best for you. I don't plan on ever switching from FL, in fact I am getting the iPhone version to jot down drum ideas on the run.

Like I said I see FL, Pro Tools, Cubase, Logic, Reaper, etc. all on the same level its just what people like. Don't let other people make choices for you. Try demos of all and see what you like best.

EDIT: All the music in my sigs we created in FL the only problems with them are the problems with EQ I use to have and that has nothing to do with DAWs.
Last edited by FireHawk at Jun 26, 2011,
#15
Quote by GaryHB
That's already more than I paid for my multitracker (so what if it was 2nd hand) and you haven't even bought the software or the PC & any other upgrades you'd need yet.....


I feel using a proper DAW/mic/interface, no matter the cost, would still be the "best quality possible without going to a professional studio." It's also cost effective in that you actually can upgrade it and expand it with additional plugins. Plus, if a multi-tracker was of better quality, more professional studios would use them over software. I can't think of a way that a multi-tracker beats out the DAW recording method in terms of quality.
#16
Quote by GaryHB
Can't agree with that. I know of at least half a dozen people who've completely lost all their work when the PC they were using got a virus

I must say you can't blame that on computers. That is just someone being irresponsible. The same exact error can be made overwriting something recorded on a multitrack recorder. If backups aren't made in either way it possible to fall victim of this.

Anyway...

I believe that multitracks are a thing of the past myself, but with that said if that is what the guy likes doing, let him do it.

I prefer FL Studio and amp sims over Cubase and Micing Amps, and I know how to do both properly. I just prefer it one way over another even if its not the most popular way.
#17
Firehawk, did you find a solution for tempo changes in song using FL ?

I believe since you shifted from Cubase to Fl, that means it causes no problem for you.

I've been told about adding an automation clip, but I fail to see how is that possible with tempo.

My solution , which doesn't work great, is to avoid songs with tempo changes ( hard since I m a progressive metal fan ), and the other one, is just process the drums alone, and then extract, and then reupload as an mp3 in the FL Daw, however that causes some mixing problems since I can't control the drumming sounds
The symphonizer
Last edited by Sympho at Jun 27, 2011,
#18
Quote by Sympho
Firehawk, did you find a solution for tempo changes in song using FL ?

I believe since you shifted from Cubase to Fl, that means it causes no problem for you.

I've been told about adding an automation clip, but I fail to see how is that possible with tempo.

My solution , which doesn't work great, is to avoid songs with tempo changes ( hard since I m a progressive metal fan ), and the other one, is just process the drums alone, and then extract, and then reupload as an mp3 in the FL Daw, however that causes some mixing problems since I can't control the drumming sounds
I don't think there is a solution yet. You can make the automation clip but whenever it hits the new tempo spot, the samples on the playlist automatically resize -- it's very sloppy.
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#19
If it does what you want it to then it's fine.

For mixing and stuff though I can't see it being much good...
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Quote by DisarmGoliath
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#20
Quote by ChemicalFire
If it does what you want it to then it's fine.

For mixing and stuff though I can't see it being much good...

If your referring to FL Studio I would disagree as mixing is its biggest strength with its effects chain setup.

As for automation if you are doing progressive I wouldn't use FL. That is one genre that I don't think FL can do efficiently, because of the jank tempo automation. While you can automate the tempo it can look confusing at first. Its a very flawed system but if you play with it you can get the hang of it. When ever I do tempo changes in FL I set project tempo at the faster BPM (via tapping out on a midi device). Then for the slow parts I tap out a bpm set highhats on that count then export them as an mp3 metronome. I reset the bpm back to the original tempo and import the metronome and loop where needed. Like I said FL is not made for a lot of tempo changes. You can pull off a few but its just not to the point where its tempo change is real fluent. It is better than it was in FL 6 and 7 though which is miles ahead of where it was when it was called Fruity Loops lol. Lucky I very very rarely do big changes that aren't double speed or half speed (which are easy to adjust to without adjust bpm on a project).
Quote by Sympho
My solution , which doesn't work great, is to avoid songs with tempo changes ( hard since I m a progressive metal fan ), and the other one, is just process the drums alone, and then extract, and then reupload as an mp3 in the FL Daw, however that causes some mixing problems since I can't control the drumming sounds

If you export each sound indivudally and link them to the mixer it would work just as well, but like I said FL's biggest weakness is easily tempo manipulation.
Last edited by FireHawk at Jun 27, 2011,
#21
Quote by GaryHB

And finally: *quote of me*


If you're not going to post a sensible comment, don't bother posting. I don't mind people disagreeing and putting forward a response which supports and justifies their point of view stating what they see as the primary weakness of the post they are replying to and how their point of view resolves these weaknesses. Unfortunately with that post all you have succeeded in doing is proving you don't have the intelligence to put forward a fully reasoned argument in this manner, thereby discrediting your own point of view.

Feel free to think I'm discrediting myself - the actual reasons I didn't put forward anything further beyond 'Ignore this guy.' are as follows: 1) What you said was incredibly ignorant and narrow-minded anyway... almost as though you have shut yourself off from the recording world for the past decade or longer; and 2) I haven't had my computer at home as I've been tracking guitars elsewhere the last few days, and was typing on my phone... I'm not going to spend ages writing a coherent post and correcting typos from pressing keys too close together on a touchscreen phone, for the sake of saying what many others would, and did, say in response to you.


If people believe I don't have the intelligence or experience to dish out advice and/or balanced arguments in a debate, they can quite easily ignore me - however so far only two people have called me out on posts I made, and neither was due to my intellectual prowess (or alleged lack of it). One was even retracted after the guy got more sleep, and it's all cool - I'm sure I am abrasive and annoying to many on this board.


Anyway, the point of me now replying is just that I think rather than being stuck in this world of multi-track recorders being the pinnacle of home studio technology, I genuinely believe you would be surprised if you took your tinted glasses off for a second and saw digital recording for what it really is. In fact, google a few of the studios making your favourite records - I can guarantee that almost all, if not every single one, will boast of using a Pro Tools HD rig as standard, unless analogue tape recording is requested (which is completely different to your multi-track notion, as people record this way for the sound and effect of tape, not the multi-track side of it). If all the major studios have ditched multi-track recorders in favour of software-based audio workstations (DAW's) doesn't that say a lot about the state of modern recording technology?

For $60 or something, you can purchase a fully-fledged DAW (Reaper) that many people swear by, and for a few hundred $ you can get an 8-track interface likely to have better preamps than your multi-track anyway. And as most of the developed world has at least one computer in their home bought within the last 5 years, it's unlikely you wouldn't have the 'hardware' to run the DAW. Then you're free to mix the recording however you want. With your multi-track recorder you are limited to using just the software onboard, meaning no high-end plug-ins, no high quality amp sims, no/very basic editing of the recorded audio, and a very limited track count.

If I was to record something live, I could still use a computer-based setup and bounce straight afterward, I dunno what gave you an idea opposite to that, and to be honest the way I would go about recording a live gig professionally would be to record to a 24-track (or chained, for more track) hard disk recorder, and then import the audio into my DAW setup for mixing in the studio. No professional release is bounced on site, pretty much straight as it came from the desk, aside from when bands occasionally sell a recording of each gig on that night as people leave... and that's more about the memento than the recording quality.


Hopefully you can take this as advice to open your eyes to where recording is these days, rather than just a retort to your previous response.


Edit: And sorry for derailing the thread again - just felt I needed to respond to the above.
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#22
Firehawk ,

What I actually did was process the drum tracks, then export it. However , when I reimported, I noticed the sound got messed, and had a lot of unwanted reverb noises.

It could have been the encoding, I m not sure. One thing for sure, this obviously solved my tempo problem
The symphonizer
#23
Quote by Sympho
Firehawk ,

What I actually did was process the drum tracks, then export it. However , when I reimported, I noticed the sound got messed, and had a lot of unwanted reverb noises.

It could have been the encoding, I m not sure. One thing for sure, this obviously solved my tempo problem

Did you export all the sounds separate like snare ,kick, toms etc...? You should do it like that with no reverb or anything then mix it all in FL. That should fix your problem and give you more control on the sound of your mix.
#24
Its not the BEST you can get, but i use it a lot and find it is a blast to work wiht!
#25
I'm not arguing that multitrackers can replace all the kit that professional studios use, but I also don't believe they rely solely on software either - when did you ever go into a pro studio and see only a PC/Mac & a bit of interface kit? As I understand it pro studios use a mix of software, tape and multitrackers and utilise each of them at different stages of the recording & production process. There's no way I'm anywhere near that league though, so there's no point trying to compare my 2nd hand multitracker to a pro studio!

I'm not saying that people shouldn't use software - I'm just saying that for someone looking for an inexpensive way to make decent quality recordings, multitrackers are an option worth considering and may be an easier way to get started. I also didn't say multitrackers are the pinnacle of home recording - some of the more expensive ones probably are, but I'm sure that some of the more expensive software packages match them in almost every way. Each have their advantages and disadvantages, and as I said regarding the pro studio comparison - I'm not attempting to be anywhere near the pinnacle of latest technology.

I don't believe I'm being narrow minded, I'm merely providing an opinion, the same as everybody else on this forum does - that is what they are for.... For the record, I have tried both options, and for me there are more advantages to using a dedicated multitracker. I think it was cubase I tried in the past and it couldn't match the quality I got from my 8 track at the time. Then I looked into it again before upgrading to my current 16 track (can't remember what software I tried this time around, it was whatever my mate had on his PC) and still didn't find it gave me anything I couldn't get from a multitracker, but I would have needed to spend a lot more money on peripherals to use my PC than I spent on the multitracker I bought.

I'm not looking for perfection, just something I can make respectable recordings on easily and reliably. And on that note, I'm going to point out that even though I'm careful with my PCs/laptops, (I work in IT so I have a reasonable amount of knowledge how to protect them and always have the latest virus software etc), my last multitracker still outlived 3 computers. Even though I back up fairly regularly, I've still occasionally lost data saved on my PC due to disc crashes & viruses - I'd hate to lose a solo I'd recorded and liked before getting the chance to do a final mix (I'm not good enough to play the same solo twice!).

On the other hand, with my multitrackers both past & present, I've never had an issue with breakdowns or other loss of data.

And finally - @DisarmGoliath: I'll take back my mini rant at you if you take back the "ignore this guy" & narrow minded comments. I can understand you were in a position where you didn't want to type too much on your phone, but that being the case you should probably have just stated your point of view and not discounted someone else's comments without following it up.

Besides, how long is it till everybodies doing it using an app on their phone and arguing that PC software is a thing of the past.....
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#26
Quote by GaryHB

Besides, how long is it till everybodies doing it using an app on their phone and arguing that PC software is a thing of the past.....


lol slightly on topic I am getting the FL Studio Iphone app when I get my iphone next week lol
#27
Quote by FireHawk
lol slightly on topic I am getting the FL Studio Iphone app when I get my iphone next week lol


As much as I hate it, with all the new shit coming out for iPad/iPhone (both Hardware and Software), I really want to pick one up.

Like this: http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/iODock/
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#28
Quote by FireHawk
lol slightly on topic I am getting the FL Studio Iphone app when I get my iphone next week lol


Tell us how it goes when you get it!
#29
Quote by lockwolf
As much as I hate it, with all the new shit coming out for iPad/iPhone (both Hardware and Software), I really want to pick one up.

Like this: http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/iODock/


yeah i am already downloading apps to do music production while on the bus and such. i don't think i could ever only use an iphone though.

also ill let you know you guys know how it is....i hope its worth the 20 bucks for the FL app lol....i am an image-line ***** though lol
#30
I find FL Studio much easier for electronic music, but I only use Cubase to actually record. I find it the easiest to instantly record and use inserts.
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Some of My Recent Songs

[thread="1403441"]Synthetic Damage WIP[/thread]

[thread="1350364"]The Nightman Awakens[/thread]

[thread="1322579"]Into the Sunset WIP[/thread]

[thread="1296556"]Frost[/thread]
[thread="1247340"]The Butter Knife Massacre[/thread]
[thread="1253933"]Into The Sparta Pit[/thread]

[thread="1224038"]Untitled Tech Thing[/thread]
#31
Quote by GaryHB
I'm not arguing that multitrackers can replace all the kit that professional studios use, but I also don't believe they rely solely on software either - when did you ever go into a pro studio and see only a PC/Mac & a bit of interface kit? As I understand it pro studios use a mix of software, tape and multitrackers and utilise each of them at different stages of the recording & production process. There's no way I'm anywhere near that league though, so there's no point trying to compare my 2nd hand multitracker to a pro studio!

I'm not saying that people shouldn't use software - I'm just saying that for someone looking for an inexpensive way to make decent quality recordings, multitrackers are an option worth considering and may be an easier way to get started. I also didn't say multitrackers are the pinnacle of home recording - some of the more expensive ones probably are, but I'm sure that some of the more expensive software packages match them in almost every way. Each have their advantages and disadvantages, and as I said regarding the pro studio comparison - I'm not attempting to be anywhere near the pinnacle of latest technology.

I don't believe I'm being narrow minded, I'm merely providing an opinion, the same as everybody else on this forum does - that is what they are for.... For the record, I have tried both options, and for me there are more advantages to using a dedicated multitracker. I think it was cubase I tried in the past and it couldn't match the quality I got from my 8 track at the time. Then I looked into it again before upgrading to my current 16 track (can't remember what software I tried this time around, it was whatever my mate had on his PC) and still didn't find it gave me anything I couldn't get from a multitracker, but I would have needed to spend a lot more money on peripherals to use my PC than I spent on the multitracker I bought.

I'm not looking for perfection, just something I can make respectable recordings on easily and reliably. And on that note, I'm going to point out that even though I'm careful with my PCs/laptops, (I work in IT so I have a reasonable amount of knowledge how to protect them and always have the latest virus software etc), my last multitracker still outlived 3 computers. Even though I back up fairly regularly, I've still occasionally lost data saved on my PC due to disc crashes & viruses - I'd hate to lose a solo I'd recorded and liked before getting the chance to do a final mix (I'm not good enough to play the same solo twice!).

On the other hand, with my multitrackers both past & present, I've never had an issue with breakdowns or other loss of data.

And finally - @DisarmGoliath: I'll take back my mini rant at you if you take back the "ignore this guy" & narrow minded comments. I can understand you were in a position where you didn't want to type too much on your phone, but that being the case you should probably have just stated your point of view and not discounted someone else's comments without following it up.

Besides, how long is it till everybodies doing it using an app on their phone and arguing that PC software is a thing of the past.....


I don't think you really know anything about making music on the PC.
1: almost everyone has a PC at home
1: making music with a computer costs much less then any multi track recorder:
you need an interface : that is below a 100$ (say alesis io2)
you need a decent software: Reaper is 50$
and optionally you may want a control surface : Korg nanokontrol: 40$
i don't think you can buy a decent multitrack recorder for this money.
2: on a multitrack recorder you have limited number of track, effects, limited EQ, etc
in a DAW you don't have these limitation, you can use as much as your cpu can handle, or even more is you bounce the track ("freeze" track)
3: you don't need to buy any adottional software, because there are so many great free vts and vsti.
4: I used a my last PC for 6 years, and it still works, i just wanted something faster
also if you don't visit unsafe sites, and don't plug in unknown pendrives you don't have to fear from viruses, and windows 7 has a decent antivirus built in.
5: if you had a lot of disk crashes that is probably a bad quality drive, incorrect use or a bad, cheap power supply, hard disks don't crash for no reason. also if what you doing is critical you probably want to drives in parallel (same data on both disk) to be safe.

What do you mean that a cubase couldn't match the sound quality of your multitrack? (aside from the myth that "hardware sound better")
If you say it didn't gave you anything that is probably because you didn't had the effects and the know how.
Seriously, what is that a multitrack can give you and a DAW can't, i just can't imagine
#32
And here's another person who chooses to belittle someone's opinion because it doesn't match their own....

You're wrong to say I don't know anything about recording with software. I'm the first to admit I don't know EVERYTHING about it, but I definitely don't know nothing. Look at it this way:
The last few times I've bought a new car, its always been a BMW. I've always test driven others such as Ford & Mercedes as well, but ended up choosing the BMW. Does that mean I don't know anything about Ford/Mercedes? Does it mean I'm wrong because I have chosen to stick with what works for me after checking out the alternatives? No on both counts.

The same applies here - each time I've upgraded my recording equipment, I've tried a few different options and chosen the one I liked best.

Unfortunately I seem to be the only person here open minded enough to admit that both options are viable choices, everybody else appears to think software is the only way forward.

I've never said that hardware is better than software. They both have their advantages and disadvantages, and throughout this thread I've been perfectly happy to admit that I don't know all there is to know about software - I couldn't even say I know all there is to know about using hardware!

It's a shame you aren't able to admit you don't know all there is to know about multitrackers. Yes, you are limited to the number of tracks the multitracker has, but I never use all 16 of them anyway. If I was ever in a situation where I needed more than that (although I can't think why I would) each of the tracks has 10 virtual tracks, it is possible to bounce these into the final mix so you can technically have up to 160 tracks using my kit. However, that many tracks would definitely be easier to manage on software and if I thought I'd ever be in that situation I'd certainly start using software, but I think the most I've ever used was 9 or 10 tracks anyway.

As for your other comment about EQ, effects & bouncing, that just proves your lack of knowledge. Both my current kit and my last kit had more than enough of this capability than I've ever needed. If you're going to attempt to shoot down someone for having an opinion, please make sure you get your facts right first.

Lets face it, at the end of the day these things come down to personal preference. I know plenty of people who agree with me and plenty of people who prefer software. There isn't a definitive answer when all that matters is opinion.

As for your assumption that I have only had PC issues because of 'unsafe sites':
a - no matter how much you only visit safe sites, PCs can still have issues. The PCs where I work have no internet access whatsoever, they still occasionally experience issues
b - I have a separate computer at home for that anyway ;o)
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#33
Quote by GaryHB
If you want the best quality possible without going to a professional studio, you'd be better off spending some money on a proper multitrack recorder instead of playing around with computer software. You can get some excellent 2nd hand kit cheaply on ebay.

Software is OK for playing around with, but if you want to do things properly you need to have the proper kit to do it with.


This is utter crap. No offense. Any of the notable computer DAW's on the market (Pro Tools, Reaper, Cubase, Sonar, Studio One, FL Studio, Ableton etc...etc...) are considerably more flexible and dynamic than any multitrack recorder you could buy. The above statement is simply false. That is not to say that you can't make great music with a hardware multitrack recorder, don't get me wrong. But a multitrack recorder is not "the proper way to do things" when it comes to music production. It is "one of the ways to do things".

GaryHB you responded to a guy asking why FL Studio had a lot of "bad press" by saying "because DAW's (software) aren't the right way to make music, they're for playing around, multitrack recorders are the proper way to do it". Go back and read your first post (I quoted it for you ). It's pretty clear what you meant, backtracking now is a bit silly since it's all written down )

Quote by Nemui-Kuma
Reaper is Great!, but it has less features than FL studio.


Also crap. FL Studio and Reaper are two programs that have a similar intent, but approach music production in very different ways. Reaper's designers approached DAW design much more from an audio intensive (similar to Pro Tools) perspective. Though it is very capable at MIDI production as well. FL Studio was born out of MIDI programming and was more focused on live music creation (Ableton Live is similar as well). But to say that one is more fully featured than the other is misleading.

Quote by Cheesepuff
FLStudio is more geared towards electronic music.

as a rock musician, get sonar or something.


Also incorrect. FL Studio is more geared towards live music, but it can be used to do all of the same things that the others can do. As I said, some of the design decisions are different, but the same capabilities are there.

FL Studio's designers are obviously heavily invested in the development of MIDI based music. That was the first thing it did really well (when it was Fruity Loops). The audio recording capabilities were lagging for some time but with the past two verisions (9 and 10) they have significantly changed that. I'd argue that FL Studio is as capable as the others. I do, however, feel as though because of it's history, it's strength is still in it's piano roll, MIDI and looping methodology. There is no one type of music that FL Studio can't do. There are some recording methods that aren't as efficient because of it's design decisions (it doesn't adhere to some of the "standards" that other DAW's use). But it can do all of the same things. It's a matter of learning how.

As for the multitrack discussion, I dont' know man. You're behind the times. If you're going to be doing live work MAYBE. Because I suppose technology is scary in that it can fail. But the same goes for any multitracker. A good digital mixer (like a StudioLive or the Aleisis or Yamaha competitors) will go a LONG way towards making your live recording life easier, as well as your studio work.

Quote by GaryHB
That's already more than I paid for my multitracker (so what if it was 2nd hand) and you haven't even bought the software or the PC & any other upgrades you'd need yet.....


What multitracker are you talking about then? Because any multitracker that you paid $500 for is pretty much guaranteed to NOT be able to deliver the same capabilities as a digital interface into a DAW. Not even close.
Last edited by Gizzmo0411 at Jul 1, 2011,
#34
This is getting beyond tiresome now: Gary prefers multi-track hardware, most in this thread prefer software; let's just leave it there and stop arguing about each post to try and convince the other 'side' they're wrong - thread was supposed to be about FL Studio.


All I will say to Gary is ths though: Personal opinions are fine, my problem was your first post which is completely different to the attitude of your latter posts. Case in point - you now say both options are viable and people need to be open-minded... read your first post again.

Quote by GaryHB
If you want the best quality possible without going to a professional studio, you'd be better off spending some money on a proper multitrack recorder instead of playing around with computer software. You can get some excellent 2nd hand kit cheaply on ebay.

Software is OK for playing around with, but if you want to do things properly you need to have the proper kit to do it with.


Doesn't sound like you think they're both viable for pro quality there... and with that, I won't say anymore about the matter!
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#35
Software is OK for playing around with, but if you want to do things properly you need to have the proper kit to do it with.


OK, so that was a bit harsh - and not quite what I meant! I basically meant that for someone who wants an easy way to get into home recording, using some cheap dedicated equipment can be a better option than playing around with some of the software that can be downloaded, especially that which can be downloaded free or free to try. It was a badly worded comment which I'm happy to "backtrack" on, but only on it's wording, not on what I meant by it.

As for the kit I'm using - it's a Yamaha 16 track recorder, does everything I want it to and more, and I paid £145 for it 2nd hand. Buying new, the RRP is £1195 for the kit I've bought. Sounds like a bargain to me - and definitely cheaper than buying software and the necessary interfaces.

I've been happy to admit all along (well, after my original comment which I admit was poorly worded) that both have good and bad points, unfortunately it seems nobody else here can admit this and can only see themselves as being right.

However, one thing that nobody can argue with is that when I'm done with my kit, I'll be able to sell it on and will probably get most of my money back. You definitely can't do that with software which is downloaded and all you actually buy is the licence to use it.

As I said in all my posts since the first poorly worded one - I've tried both and so far I've always chosen hardware, maybe next time around it'll be different, but for now I'm more than happy with what I've got.

Why can't people understand that all I'm doing is providing an opinion - saying I'm wrong doesn't prove anything other than the fact that you have a different opinion. However, if we're merely pointing out flaws in people's arguments rather than putting forward a sensible response, can I point out that DAW stands for Digital Audio Workstation - that is exactly what I have. An Audio Workstation which is Digital. It even calls itself that in the official specs.
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#36
All I will say to Gary is ths though: Personal opinions are fine, my problem was your first post which is completely different to the attitude of your latter posts. Case in point - you now say both options are viable and people need to be open-minded... read your first post again.


I guess you were typing that at the same time I was typing my last comment - fair play, you admitted one of your comments was written in a hurry and maybe not quite what you meant, I'm man enough to admit my original comment was badly worded too.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
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#37
I accept the challenge.


I m going to prove to everyone how good Fl Studio is.
The symphonizer
#38
Well this thread has taken on a life of it's own I see, but in case anyone's interested I'm no longer really bothered to explore beyond FL. I just got Addictive Drums and that combined with a cab emulator for my guitar has been blowing me away in terms of the quality of recording I can produce. I agree that there are certain downfalls if you want to be writing techy stuff with tempo changes, but at the moment I'm writing pretty straightforward rock stuff so it's really not a problem.