#1
Hi!
I have gotten quite a bit of kind help from this great community to convert some of my sheet music that I purchased to Guitar Pro format... but I would like to do things myself as well rather than bother you guys all the time.

The song is "Oh Come All Ye Faithful" and it's in 4/4 time.

While converting from my PDF to GP I came accross this:


My questions:
1. As you can see, the first note is a half note... but how do I get a rest above the half note? As I click on the rest symbol the half note disappears

2. It's the same for the 3rd note.

3. I am very much learning how to read music and a total newbie but I think the above means play the first note, and let it hold, then play the other notes... the problem is when I "play it" in GP it goes to the first 3 notes (half, quarter quarter) and then skips ahead instead of going first note(hold) then play other notes.

A wiser head than mine is needed here

Thanks in advance!
“God gave men both a penis and a brain, but unfortunately not enough blood supply to run both at the same time.”
(My hero) - Robin Williams
#2
I've been taking piano lessons for about 6 months, but have never seen a rest above a note like that. Typically, you'll see a rest on the bass cleff or the treble cleff, but not on the same cleff above or below a note, or notes. You also have a dotted quarter note, which means extend it by half of its original value. The last note is an eighth note, so everything adds up right. I'd forget about putting in the rest above the F and E - not sure if they're sharp or flat, since you didn't include the rest of the song. Just don't forget to dot the quarter note (the E) and use an eighth note for the last one. It should be fine that way.
#3
is it that you can't get the rest in the tab below or your unsure as to how to play it?
#4
Quote by KG6_Steven
I've been taking piano lessons for about 6 months, but have never seen a rest above a note like that. Typically, you'll see a rest on the bass cleff or the treble cleff, but not on the same cleff above or below a note, or notes. You also have a dotted quarter note, which means extend it by half of its original value. The last note is an eighth note, so everything adds up right. I'd forget about putting in the rest above the F and E - not sure if they're sharp or flat, since you didn't include the rest of the song. Just don't forget to dot the quarter note (the E) and use an eighth note for the last one. It should be fine that way.



Except in special cases, if you have two independent voices following separate rhythms then rests are notated separately for each melody as is seen in the picture. Without those rests then it is unclear of when to start playing the top part in relation to the bottom part.
#5
@Jesse, yep! That worked out great, thanks!!!

@KG, Sorry, I'm new to this and didnt know I should add that, here it is:


@gavk, didnt know how to get it there.

While we are on the subject, can you tell me what these two things mean:



I found how to do the thing that looks like eyes, but what is the other thing and how do I add it?

Thanks!
“God gave men both a penis and a brain, but unfortunately not enough blood supply to run both at the same time.”
(My hero) - Robin Williams
#6
Quote by Vlasco
Except in special cases, if you have two independent voices following separate rhythms then rests are notated separately for each melody as is seen in the picture. Without those rests then it is unclear of when to start playing the top part in relation to the bottom part.



Thanks for the explanation. I knew there had to be a reason for it, but my 6 months of lessons hadn't revealed it to me yet.
#7
The thing that looks like eyes in the last one is called a Fermata. It means to hold the note longer than usual.

Edit: Thanks for posting the staffs from the start of the song. This tells me we're in the key of G, since we have an F#.
Last edited by KG6_Steven at Jun 26, 2011,
#8
@KG, Yep, I figured out the Fermata as I had to specify how long to hold the note... but what are those slanted line thingies?

Mind explaining the theory as to how you knew we are in the Key of G when other keys also have a F# in it? (Might be a silly question, but am a total noob to this)

Thanks!
“God gave men both a penis and a brain, but unfortunately not enough blood supply to run both at the same time.”
(My hero) - Robin Williams
#9
You've got me on the slanted lines. I know they're not for legato, which looks different. I'm going to have to defer to one of the other piano experts for that one.

Theory behind the key of G. Sure. That's relatively easy. Keys are made up of intervals. An interval is nothing more than the distance from one note to the next. For example, the interval from B to C is a half step. The interval from A to B is a whole step. E to F is another half step interval. As long as we understand that, we can move on. So, if we have a bunch of notes and they're comprised of varying intervals, we end up with a scale. Scales have formulas. The formula for a major scale is Whole, Whole, Half, Whole, Whole, Whole, Half. Let's apply this to the key of C major, which has no sharps or flats.

W W H W W W H
C D E F G A B C

Hopefully the spacing came out right on that scale. So, that's how we build a major scale. Let's do the same thing for G major and see what we get.


W W H W W W H
G A B C D E F# G

As you can see, the key of G major has one sharp and it's the F#. If you read sheet music, or standard notation, there's another trick you can use to quickly determine the key, without doing the mental math to figure out the intervals and sharps and flats in a key. Here's a nice link which explains this method and some other theory.

http://www.playpiano.com/Articles/24-majorkeyof.htm
#10
Quote by KG6_Steven
You've got me on the slanted lines. I know they're not for legato, which looks different. I'm going to have to defer to one of the other piano experts for that one.

Theory behind the key of G. Sure. That's relatively easy. Keys are made up of intervals. An interval is nothing more than the distance from one note to the next. For example, the interval from B to C is a half step. The interval from A to B is a whole step. E to F is another half step interval. As long as we understand that, we can move on. So, if we have a bunch of notes and they're comprised of varying intervals, we end up with a scale. Scales have formulas. The formula for a major scale is Whole, Whole, Half, Whole, Whole, Whole, Half. Let's apply this to the key of C major, which has no sharps or flats.

W W H W W W H
C D E F G A B C

Hopefully the spacing came out right on that scale. So, that's how we build a major scale. Let's do the same thing for G major and see what we get.


W W H W W W H
G A B C D E F# G

As you can see, the key of G major has one sharp and it's the F#. If you read sheet music, or standard notation, there's another trick you can use to quickly determine the key, without doing the mental math to figure out the intervals and sharps and flats in a key. Here's a nice link which explains this method and some other theory.

http://www.playpiano.com/Articles/24-majorkeyof.htm

Whoa! Thanks for taking the time to write all that.
I actually do know intervals and what makes up the major scale etc... but I am a bit confused as to how you know which scale it is when other scales also have a F# in it.

For example the 6th in a A major scale is a F#...

A B C# D E F# G#
so why didnt you think it's in the key of A instead?

Will def have a look at that link.

Thanks!
“God gave men both a penis and a brain, but unfortunately not enough blood supply to run both at the same time.”
(My hero) - Robin Williams
#11
Jesse nailed it on the head. The key of G major has only one sharp and it's F#. No other key uses solely the F#. Another key might have the F# in it, such as D major, but ONLY G major has just the F#. Since I mentioned D major, let's take a quick look at it - it has an F# in it - this is the iii interval. It has:

D E F# G A B C# D

Now we know that D major has two sharps - F# and C#. How about E major?

E F# G# A B C# D#

Note that it has 4 sharps - F#, G#, C# and D#. Ideally, this is something that you'll memorize and be able to recall on demand. What about flats?

F G A Bb C D E F

The key of F has one flat, which is Bb.

We can also use the Circle of Fifths to determine key signatures. The example below shows how many sharps or flats are in each key and also gives us a staff, which we can use to determine which notes they are.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circle_of_fifths

Hope this helps you.
#12
Thanks guys! Just getting my head around the circle of fifths so this is starting to make sense.

Cheers!
“God gave men both a penis and a brain, but unfortunately not enough blood supply to run both at the same time.”
(My hero) - Robin Williams