#1
Hey I have been playing guitar for 3 and a half years (self taught actually) and I was wondering what other people definition of an intermedite guitarist is. I can read both notes and tab, I have most notes memorized on the neck, I know both major and minor pentatonic scales, and I know most chords that are ever used in songs. A song example that I can play is Fade to Black by metallica. I was just curious if I am considered an intermediate guitarist. Sorry if this isn't relevent, I couldn't find anything online that really answered my question.
My gear:

Fender Highway one Telecaster
Squier Strat (highly upgraded)
Ibanez Rg120
Various effect pedals
Fender Fontman 65r guitar amp
Alvarez rd4102c acoustic-electric guitar
#2
Don't worry about that.

Knowing lots of scales =/= knowing how to use them.
Knowing how to play a song =/= being able to evoke the emotions the song manages to.

Just keep playing and working on your skills.
#3
There's no measurement as to how well you're progressing. Just keep doing what you enjoy and forget about how well you're doing compared to everyone else.
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Omae wa mou
Shindeiru



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#4
Quote by blue_strat
Don't worry about that.

Knowing lots of scales =/= knowing how to use them.
Knowing how to play a song =/= being able to evoke the emotions the song manages to.

Just keep playing and working on your skills.

Ok thanks so I guess I'm just getting to caught up in that. I'll just keep practicing.
My gear:

Fender Highway one Telecaster
Squier Strat (highly upgraded)
Ibanez Rg120
Various effect pedals
Fender Fontman 65r guitar amp
Alvarez rd4102c acoustic-electric guitar
#5
if you have to ask you probably aren't.
1978 Peavey T-40 -> Ampeg Micro-VR - > Ampeg SVT210AV + Ampeg SVT-15E
#6
Quote by gtrzrule4
Ok thanks so I guess I'm just getting to caught up in that. I'll just keep practicing.

i +1 to everything blue strat said

don't sweat how "good" you are, thats a relative term and everyone defines it differently. just keep playing and practicing and learning, i've found if you consistently strive to improve then what other people consider becomes irrelevent at a certain point.
#7
Technique can be measured and pried apart; musicality is purely subjective, though, like everyone else has said.

And on stage, nobody cares if you can do dim7th string skipping at 240bpm 16ths into a 5-finger tapped arpeggio sequence if they can't move to it. That's why Metallica vids from the 80s have a lot more views than Paul Gilbert vids - that's just the way of things.
modes are a social construct
#8
Quote by gtrzrule4
Hey I have been playing guitar for 3 and a half years (self taught actually) and I was wondering what other people definition of an intermedite guitarist is. I can read both notes and tab, I have most notes memorized on the neck, I know both major and minor pentatonic scales, and I know most chords that are ever used in songs. A song example that I can play is Fade to Black by metallica. I was just curious if I am considered an intermediate guitarist. Sorry if this isn't relevent, I couldn't find anything online that really answered my question.


In my opinion you definitely wouldn't be considered a beginner, if you stepped into my school, but I would test you to isolate your "gaps" in knowledge. I don't consider technique a matter of "level" I've known a lot of technically efficient, dumb guitarists. It's a thin veil, and all it says to me is someone's practiced hard to be able to do 1 thing. I prefer a well rounded knowledgeable guitarist.

So, I never count technique as a big factor, sometimes technique is quite juvenile, in their prevailing attitudes/beliefs that... good=great technique.

I don't buy into that. Technique is good, but when it's overemphasized to the point where they have little to no development in core skills and understanding what they are playing/doing....

Best,

Sean
#9
Music is subjective man. Don't worry, you will get where you want to in no time if you keep practicing. A shitty guitarist for someone is a guitar god to someone else. I used to be called a shitty guitarist, but I kept going and now I can play some difficult shit. Look at where those ******s are now. They are nothing. If you stay true to your goal, you will always get there no matter what. Whether you're intermediate or not it doesn't matter. The question you should be asking is: Am I where I want to be? If you keep asking yourself this question, the sky is the limit.
#10
Quote by Sean0913
In my opinion you definitely wouldn't be considered a beginner, if you stepped into my school, but I would test you to isolate your "gaps" in knowledge. I don't consider technique a matter of "level" I've known a lot of technically efficient, dumb guitarists. It's a thin veil, and all it says to me is someone's practiced hard to be able to do 1 thing. I prefer a well rounded knowledgeable guitarist.

So, I never count technique as a big factor, sometimes technique is quite juvenile, in their prevailing attitudes/beliefs that... good=great technique.

I don't buy into that. Technique is good, but when it's overemphasized to the point where they have little to no development in core skills and understanding what they are playing/doing....


Great advice, Sean. Your teaching methods demonstrate what separates a good teacher from a lazy teacher.

To the original poster- The thing to do is ask yourself what your own musical goals are, and remember that the road to reaching those goals is much more rounded than singular attributes like technique, knowledge of theory, and speed. Those things are definitely part of the entire journey, but as you learn and develop, you'll discover (mostly on your own, some through... yes... osmosis/subconsciously) what else you need and desire to fill out your goals. Don't rush the process, and resist getting discouraged. It's impossible to NOT get discouraged a bit while you're busting your hump, but keep your eye on the big picture and refer back to that when you feel things are getting ugly. As time goes on, you'll suddenly (yes... suddenly) discover you can do and/or understand things that you couldn't before, and find that it actually gets much easier and more enjoyable as you develop.

A major, major part of all of this is to get a great teacher. I cannot stress this enough. A great teacher will help you work towards you goals so much more efficiently and faster than trying to learn on your own.

As far as what others would consider your level of playing is... it's not important, so don't worry about it, and ignore those who will project their low self-esteem issues upon you with their braggadocio. I look at players that have achieved something I'm working towards as inspiration, and try to learn what I can from them as much as possible. A 13 year old student, who idolizes SRV and can conjure up an incredible amount of feel, takes lessons from the same teacher as I do (boning up on theory), and I'm always asking him questions about how he does certain bends, grace notes, etc, and feel no insecurity about doing so. He's that good!

Never stop developing, because it's a lifelong journey. Good luck!
Last edited by BrianDeuel at Jun 30, 2011,
#11
Quote by gtrzrule4
and I know most chords that are ever used in songs.



Somehow I doubt that....depends on what songs you're listening to though, I suppose. There is no way for us to tell if you're an intermediate guitarist, because that is subjective. If you can play Fade to Black, that's cool, it's a cool song. You're probably not a beginner, at least not in terms of technique. But, we don't know how well you can play it, how knowledgeable you are of the actual structure of the song, if you just learned it from a tab note for note or if you transcribed it, etc.


It's extremely hard to answer this question, and in the end it doesn't really matter. You could always use more practice. Anyone could. So don't worry about it and just focus on getting better.
#12
We all define ourselves!

The same way we define our skill level “beginner, intermediate, expert, ect…” we also define how we see ourselves and how others see us. Such as calling yourself a guitarist, instrumentalist, multi-instrumentalist, composer, conductor, singer, recording-artist, ect… you can call yourself whatever you want, hell you could sum all that up in one word “musician” if you wanted to.

At the end of the day what you consider yourself and what others consider you, has no bearing on your music does it? So why get caught up in a title that means absolutely nothing!?
Quote by MetlHed94



Well played, sir, well played.