#1
Right, so I'm a complete newbie when it comes to singing, so treat me like one.

Basically, sometimes when I try to sing along to a song I find it hard to pick which octave I should sing it. Sometimes one octave sames really low and the one above seems to high (for me at least). My range sucks obviously, but I still find it strange that I can't quite decide which octave the singer himself is in.

Help?
#2
Just SSSSSSSIIIIIIIIINNNNNNNNNNNGGGGGGGGGGGGG. That's all I have to say
Guitarist & Bassist
#3
Quote by Asa Carter
Just SSSSSSSIIIIIIIIINNNNNNNNNNNGGGGGGGGGGGGG. That's all I have to say


#4
Quote by Asa Carter
Just SSSSSSSIIIIIIIIINNNNNNNNNNNGGGGGGGGGGGGG. That's all I have to say


...valid advice, doesn't really answer TS' question though.

Lots of singing newbies tend to sing an octave below the actual song, because it's easy and sounds sort of the same as the singer they're emulating. This is not what the singer is actually doing. Don't rely on your beginner voice just yet to pick the melody out, that is a skill that comes with practice.

Try and play the vocal melody on a guitar or piano. It should be easier for you to recognise the difference there between someone singing an E4 versus an E3. Alternatively look at a GP file where someone has transcribed the vocal part.

When you play an E3 and an E4 on guitar, this is the difference between singing those two notes. For the purposes of copying the singer, one is right and one is wrong.

Sing along to your transcribed melody at first, because it's easier to pick out a single note from a guitar/piano than from a full band which might have backing vocals or other things that will confuse you.

Hope this helps.
#5
^^ Good advice!
Searching for the perfect gear is endless. Buying a better amp you may notice how shitty your guitar is and vice versa. I've spent thousands of dollars in pursuit of the perfect sound, which I'll never completely capture. -B. Corgan
#6
When singing along to songs, i often sing in the octave lower than the original pitch. It really depends on the song, but i do it simply because it's easier and needs less concentration.
It's not a problem to sing the songs in a lower octave, it can actually be really helpful.
Lower notes requires less air/support etc. than high notes, so singing songs in a lower pitch can be usefull if you want to work on your technique.
#7
Quote by KrisHQ
When singing along to songs, i often sing in the octave lower than the original pitch. It really depends on the song, but i do it simply because it's easier and needs less concentration.
It's not a problem to sing the songs in a lower octave, it can actually be really helpful.
Lower notes requires less air/support etc. than high notes, so singing songs in a lower pitch can be usefull if you want to work on your technique.


I do that too. Infact when I wised up and finally started singing notes that was possible for me to hit is when I really started to see big improvements. So if you have a pick a octave. and the higher one is to high sing low. Like KrishQ said its great for vocal technique.

Some advice if your having trouble singing.

Try not to use words and just vowels great for warm up.
Turning the music off grabbing my guitar and playing the song myself helps.

Transcribing is a great thing to do If your having a hard time pick an easyer song. But training your ears to identify pitch will help TONS no matter what