#1
I want to develop a strong lead guitar ability and I know that in order to be truly great at it, one must have a good ear for music; i.e. know the fretboard inside and out and know what to play in your head before you begin to play and not just moving your fingers around in a scale trying to fill up space with notes. How can I practice and develop this strong ear for music and begin to apply and integrate it with other things?
#2
welll you must train your ear pretty good try learnign songs by ear
theres a good ear trainer on musictheory.net

also learn how scales sound and chords and interval relate to each other and try to listen really listen to music
Last edited by supersac at Jun 26, 2011,
#3
Check out the Perfect Pitch and Relative Pitch from David Lucas Burge, it a course with alot lessons with Homerworks and Exams and easy to digest, you don't to be a advance player to take it, you don't even need to know how to play guitar. i think you can download it via TorrenT, btw all lessons are in MP3.files but no worry its pretty easy to understand what he says and by the end you will have a ear 5x powerful then you current.
you won't work only in recognize, notes/scales/intervals/all kinds of chords dim, aum, major minor etcetc but also on speed recognize.
On Relative Pitch you have a total of 41 Lessons with 40min/1h each lesson divided on 5 Levels
#4
It just comes to you over time. It's best to practice with theory under your belt and active listening being used, but asking how to get a good musical ear is like asking how to grow your hair long - it just happens over time, and there's very few things that can really speed it up.

It's not like running scales up and down, it's just a natural development that comes with playing and listening over a long, long time, and it'll develop for many years in many different ways. If you compare recordings of you now to recordings a year ago, they'll probably be extremely different, and it's the same with your musical ear.
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#5
Quote by Macacodorado
Check out the Perfect Pitch and Relative Pitch from David Lucas Burge, it a course with alot lessons with Homerworks and Exams and easy to digest, you don't to be a advance player to take it, you don't even need to know how to play guitar. i think you can download it via TorrenT, btw all lessons are in MP3.files but no worry its pretty easy to understand what he says and by the end you will have a ear 5x powerful then you current.
you won't work only in recognize, notes/scales/intervals/all kinds of chords dim, aum, major minor etcetc but also on speed recognize.
On Relative Pitch you have a total of 41 Lessons with 40min/1h each lesson divided on 5 Levels

Lol, **** off with your advertisements Mr Burge
#6
like others have pointed out, it's a process that takes time to develop.

the only thing you can do to assist it is to learn to listen actively. learn to analyze music only by hearing it. this is where knowing theory comes in -- it's much easier to remember something if your brain knows what to label it as. if i hear an interval and i know it's a major sixth, but i don't know it's called a major sixth, i'll only remember the sound. i would know nothing about how to create it when i want it. eventually, i'd stumble upon it, and i'd probably remember that. but then i'd have to do that for each interval.

or i could just know what they're called, learn how they sound, and i'll be well off. then when i hear that major sixth, i'll say "that's a major sixth!", and when i want to use that sound in a composition, i'll play an A, and then go up to an F#.

which way seems more efficient to you?
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#7
Quote by Templar0220
I want to develop a strong lead guitar ability and I know that in order to be truly great at it, one must have a good ear for music; i.e. know the fretboard inside and out and know what to play in your head before you begin to play and not just moving your fingers around in a scale trying to fill up space with notes. How can I practice and develop this strong ear for music and begin to apply and integrate it with other things?



You should play along to backing tracks on youtube or something. Look for an A minor backing track or something. It might help to know the progression of the track but if you use your ears you don't have to. Improvise over it SLOOOWWLY and try to hear how the notes match and sound good at particular instances. practice phrasing too and DO NOT focus on going fast or that stuff just play what you feel like playing and let it come naturally. try to let ideas come to your head. if you cannot then you need to probably listen to some of your fav guitarists to help give you some ideas first.

If you know theory you can throw in arpeggios over a chord like over an A minor chord you can do A minor arpeggio and you will hear how good that sounds because all the notes match it.

whatever key the song is in try to focus on resolving your leads on the home chord as that will help you sound like your lick are in A minor..dont just keep noodling around aimlessly on any note
Last edited by Appetite_4_GNR at Jun 27, 2011,
#8
Quote by Templar0220
I want to develop a strong lead guitar ability and I know that in order to be truly great at it, one must have a good ear for music; i.e. know the fretboard inside and out and know what to play in your head before you begin to play and not just moving your fingers around in a scale trying to fill up space with notes. How can I practice and develop this strong ear for music and begin to apply and integrate it with other things?


In my opinion, learn theory. It gives you an understanding of the big picture. Once you see that big picture, play and practice and apply theory a lot. Analyse songs, transcribe solos (not in an abstract form, but in a way that you see what's going on and can connect it with understanding.). Then learn the sounds of pitch collections and intervals, ear training helps, understanding both kinds of intervals, hearing inversions, spotting cadences, modulations etc.

Immerse yourself and always try to immediately apply things that you learn.

Best,

Sean