#1
I've always wondered how would you get Paul's bass tone what is the secret to getting it
any help will be great
#2
I'm no expert, but I think most of it has to do with the fact he uses a Hofner Violin bass, and that's what gives him that kind of sound.
#3
They also recorded it via a DI box for a lot of their work, which means less mids, more bass. And nice clean picking
#4
A lot of factors there really. The Hofners and Ricks. I think he used a 4001? The Vox amps he used. But most of it had to do with him, pretty much everything to do with his playing style.
Basses:
Fender Precision Bass
Fender Jazz Bass
1967 Fender Coronado Bass II
Warwick Star Bass
Squier Precision Bass TB
#7
thanks for all the help
Fender Squier MIM P bass
Stilleo 4 Extreme
Acoustic B20
Boss Me-20b
premier late 70s early 80s jazz kit
#9
1) Rubber Band
2) Shoebox
3) Cut hole in the Shoebox
4) String Rubber Band across hole

but seriously, which year?
Quote by FatalGear41
I wouldn't call what we have here on the Bass Forum a mentality. It's more like the sharing part of an AA meeting.

Quote by Jason Jillard
HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


Warwick Fortress>>Acoustic AB50

http://www.myspace.com/rustingbloom
#10
His was a 62 Hofner and he had a 64 4001 i believe it was an S model
Fender Squier MIM P bass
Stilleo 4 Extreme
Acoustic B20
Boss Me-20b
premier late 70s early 80s jazz kit
#11
iirc he used the violin bass until he switched to rickenbackers on rubber soul or revolver.. then went back to the violin bass on let it be and abbey road.

I never really thought about what strings he used.. but now fatalgear has mentioned flatwounds and I feel stupid for not noticing before >.>
you still have zoiiidbeeeerg
(V) (;,,;) (V)
YOU ALL STILL HAVE ZOIDBERG
Quote by TheBurningFish
It's more shocking to see Tom dressed at all.
Quote by suckersdream
I don't think I've ever actually seen him clothed.
Sexy Peoples Only
◕ ‿ ◕
TweetZ
#12
His sound has varied over time. He played Rickenbackers for a while.

Hofners are indeed cool. There is something about the attack and decay of the music notes that remind you of an upright bass. It's important to note that the scale of the neck is much smaller than a standard bass. I think one of the reasons McCartney selected a Hofner in the early days was that it was easier for him to sing and play without looking at the neck because the neck was smaller. He wanted to look out at the audience. To this day, he is outstanding at singing and playing at the same time.

There is a very specific set of expensive strings to buy for that bass. I forget off the top of my head what they are, but they make a difference.
#13
The reason that McCartney played Hofners was that they were cheap compared to say, Fenders and other higher end basses at the time.

Personally, I agree with Humanity, they sound like someones stretched rubberbands over a shoebox. But to each his own.
#14
Sir Paul has stated that he started with a Hofner mainly because it was the only bass available in Germany at the time. Fenders were unavailable in Europe due to taxes and import restrictions - people went to great lengths back then to get Fender and Gibson guitars and basses. He also liked it because being left-handed, the bass felt very much the same when turned upside down and restrung.

He has stuck with the thing, though. In the last several years, he seems to bring it out for a few numbers whenever he plays live. I guess he knows his fans get a kick out of seeing him play it.

I think a lot of people who play Hofner "Beatle Basses" actually play low-end Hofners or cheapo copies. I've never played one of the high-end models, but I imagine they play and sound better than the run-of-the-mill knockoffs. And if you want that classic Beatles bass tone, it's a Hofner with Rotosound Tapewound flats or bust.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#15
Quote by FatalGear41
Don't forget the flatwounds. Rotosound Tru Bass Tapewound 88s, I believe:

http://www.rotosound.com/tru_88.php

I think he used those on the Rickenbacker, which makes little sense to me, but he definitely used Pyramid Gold strings on his Hofner. I wouldn't wish those strings on anyone though.

People commenting on his technique: with his bassy and treble-free tone, his technique had very little to do with his tone. Play with a pick but not in an aggressive way, that's all there is to it.

Quote by anarkee
Personally, I agree with Humanity, they sound like someones stretched rubberbands over a shoebox. But to each his own.

Bam, Pyramid Gold strings in a sentence.
Last edited by Spaz91 at Jul 1, 2011,
#16
Those Pyramids go for US$72.00 a set!

You know you love them!

(Invalid img)
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#17
The Pyramids are a little smaller than ROTO 77LD.
I'd love to try them.

I play 77LD and find that I can use less string relief
and lower action than any round wound string. That,
and the smooth feel make the bass easier to play,
as well as sounding way better.

Tabdog
#18
Quote by scimitar_255
They also recorded it via a DI box for a lot of their work, which means less mids, more bass. And nice clean picking



Lies.

The DI box wasn't invented when they started. I know for Sgt.Peppers they used two bass cabs bolted together, one to act as a microphone for the other.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#20
I'm pretty sure he used a VOX ac50 (or ac150) head with a home made bass fridge that was made by a friend of his.
I've also read that he used to steal strings from pianos for his bass but that one might be a bit farfetched.
Also don't forget the dead sounding tape/roundwounds

But what year are you looking for he also played a ric later on