#1
Hey guys

I have been playing guitar for a while but I feel like I am going no where at all. I can play a variety of songs but I just cant seem to find a direction to head in with music. At the moment all the stuff I play is pretty basic, like Yellow Submarine, Bad Moon Rising, that sort of stuff on the Acoustic, but I just don't feel comfortable playing that sort of stuff over and over.

How did you guys choose what style of music you wanted to focus on? I would love to play Heavy Metal but then there are dozens of styles to choose from in that genre and at the same time I am a huge fan of classic Rock n Roll music like Roy Orbison, Elvis etc.

My problem is there is just too many scales and techniques to learn and I feel like I am not putting all my energy where it could be used best, I am getting bored with songs that just use chords and have no idea where to go from here.

I hope what I said make sense because I really would like to know how to just stay focused on at least one or 2 genres.

any help would be appreciated.
thanks
#2
why should you focus on one or two genres?

the way i see it is you play what you want to play and your"genre" will come from it
i personllay hate being put into a genre especially when i like playing and writng all sorts of music i feel like it hold you in

so my advice is dont worry about genre and just play what you want
#3
The usual thing to do is play the music you like.
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#5
The more you work on your own playing technique, the clearer it will become. In any case, don't allow yourself to get "bored" with music and try to experiment as much as possible. Learning a bit of basic music theory wouldn't hurt either.
#6
Play metal. It is incredibly intricate and abroad. You could play power metal, death metal, progressive metal, thrash metal, groove metal, technical metal, metalcore, hardcore, deathcore, grindcore, symphonic metal... there are so many to choose from. All of them good however. Except for Nu-metal, Alternative metal and rap metal. Those three suck shit.
#7
Quote by Naruto00121
Play metal. It is incredibly intricate and abroad. You could play power metal, death metal, progressive metal, thrash metal, groove metal, technical metal, metalcore, hardcore, deathcore, grindcore, symphonic metal... there are so many to choose from. All of them good however. Except for Nu-metal, Alternative metal and rap metal. Those three suck shit.


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#8
Quote by Naruto00121
Play metal. It is incredibly intricate and abroad. You could play power metal, death metal, progressive metal, thrash metal, groove metal, technical metal, metalcore, hardcore, deathcore, grindcore, symphonic metal... there are so many to choose from. All of them good however. Except for Nu-metal, Alternative metal and rap metal. Those three suck shit.


Ehh.... Most metal is anything but intricate.

Like Steven said, play the music you like.
#9
At the risk of sounding cliche, the music chooses you.

Also if you pick a genre and try to imitate it it'll just come off as non-genuine.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#10
I would say learn some jazz etudes and improv. If you are constantly learning, than many worlds besides "x genre" and "y genre" will open up.

+1 for music theory too.
#11
Play the music you like, you don't have to have deadly focus on one genre. I go through phases of what I like to play from black\death metal to blues, to playing classical guitar. Its meant to be fun, not a job.
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#12
Quote by OfficerRoseland

My problem is there is just too many scales and techniques to learn and I feel like I am not putting all my energy where it could be used best, I am getting bored with songs that just use chords and have no idea where to go from here.

There aren't really that many techniques to learn, and almost all of them are used in a variety of genres, so if you decided you wanted to play old rock and roll then the techniques you've developed for that won't suddenly be useless if you decide to start playing some other genre.

As for scales, again there aren't that many that you'll (most likely) actually use. It's really just learning small alterations of the major or minor scales, rather than whole new scales.

Limiting yourself to one particular genre is exactly that - Limiting yourself. Learn the songs you want to play, regardless of their genre.
#13
excellent advice guys, but where should I start in terms of learning music theory and scales? I know that's another thread in itself but I might as well ask.
I really appreciate the responses by the way, all of it really helps.
#14
Musictheory.net ain't a bad site. The Idiot's Guide to Music Theory was handy, as well as trying to write actual music and understand stuff.

For me, I didn't 'choose' anything. The type of music I play is widely varied, but most of it can't be confined to a couple of genres. It's the sum of all my favourite music I've ever heard over the past half-decade, and what comes out is usually what I hear in my head. Anyway, music theory is transferable. There's no specific music theory for any genre: learn the basics and improve on them and you can play anything you want.
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#15
Quote by OfficerRoseland
excellent advice guys, but where should I start in terms of learning music theory and scales? I know that's another thread in itself but I might as well ask.
I really appreciate the responses by the way, all of it really helps.


http://www.musictheory.net is a good place to start. Remember...take things slow. Too many people (myself included) try to take it all in fast and then realise a few years down the line that we've not learnt it properly.
#16
Don't learn "genres". Start by learning theory, scales and modes. Afterwards, you can explore how they're used in each genre (i.e. early rock sticks to the pentatonic, Van Halen plays Dorian, Kirk Hammett solos modally, black metal uses dissonance etc.)
#17
awesome, thanks for those links, Idiots Guide to Music Theory is some thing I might check out, is there other essential books?
#18
I've never bothered to learn a whole bunch of scales and theory.If i need to know a scale for something i'm playing then i'll go and learn it but i'm not gonna sit there and learn theory.It's just to boring.
#19
Play everything. If you run out of time, give up your other hobbies. If you still run out of time, give up your girlfriend. If you still run out of time, give up school. If you still run out of time, stop sleeping. If you still run out of time, maybe you just aren't cut out to be a musician.
#20
Quote by steven seagull
The usual thing to do is play the music you like.


^This

You don't have to have a preconceived "direction". Pick a song you like.... then learn it. Have fun playing it, and then when you feel like you need more..... pick a new song.
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#21
Quote by GuitarGuyNack
I've never bothered to learn a whole bunch of scales and theory.If i need to know a scale for something i'm playing then i'll go and learn it but i'm not gonna sit there and learn theory.It's just to boring.


Which is piss-poor advice. Just because something is "boring" doesn't mean it's not worthwhile. Even the most theoretically ignorant of players (coughcoughZakkWylde) constantly uses scales, whether they know it or not.

TS: I'm going to echo almost every other poster here because they're right: play music you like, learn your music theory (chord formation, the major scale, etc.) and you'll be alright.
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#22
Quote by jwd724
Which is piss-poor advice. Just because something is "boring" doesn't mean it's not worthwhile. Even the most theoretically ignorant of players (coughcoughZakkWylde) constantly uses scales, whether they know it or not.

TS: I'm going to echo almost every other poster here because they're right: play music you like, learn your music theory (chord formation, the major scale, etc.) and you'll be alright.


I used to feel the same way in my 20s. By the time I was in my mid-30s and started getting really bored playing the same thing over and over again, I felt a great need to expand my theory knowledge and I'm a much better player and musician because of it.

I was in the same boat at one time when it came to what style of music I wanted to play. When you're younger, your own self-image has a tendency to take over and cause you to discriminate against certain types of music. In my case, as I got into my 30s I discovered lots of different types of music that I really enjoyed, outside of my original tastes, i.e. death metal and grindcore, and found that when I started taking lessons again at a much older age, I was confused as to what I really wanted to play. As you learn more and more theory and technique, all of your influences come into play and you'll develop a style that you're happy with. You'll find yourself exploring your playing within that natural style that you're developing. Remember that you'll never stop developing that style, but it will continuously evolve.

Most of all, never give up when you become discouraged. If you put any amount of time into something, it WILL sink in, your playing WILL improve, and your knowledge will increase. Never underestimate the subconscious mind. Good luck to you!