#1
I'm trying to incorporate "chord scale soloing" into my improvisations and welcome any tip or observation about them.

In a rock context, before I was trying general box pattern approaches, then moved on to "chord tone" soloing, but found it to be more or less the same since rock chords are pretty simple, mostly major and minor so you really don't have to think about chord tones.

But the concept of incorporating the tensions, such as the chord scale method suggests, interests me because I think I've already been doing it informally. I don't think inside a given pattern but play chord tones and every once in a while throw in a tension, or what I think is a tension.

Now, again in rock, I really don't think there are many interesting tensions so I wonder if this method only really works for jazz or if I'm on the right track for anything.
#2
Quote by gypsyblues
I'm trying to incorporate "chord scale soloing" into my improvisations and welcome any tip or observation about them.

In a rock context, before I was trying general box pattern approaches, then moved on to "chord tone" soloing, but found it to be more or less the same since rock chords are pretty simple, mostly major and minor so you really don't have to think about chord tones.

But the concept of incorporating the tensions, such as the chord scale method suggests, interests me because I think I've already been doing it informally. I don't think inside a given pattern but play chord tones and every once in a while throw in a tension, or what I think is a tension.

Now, again in rock, I really don't think there are many interesting tensions so I wonder if this method only really works for jazz or if I'm on the right track for anything.


Are you talking about chord tone soloing or chordal melody soloing? Chord Melody is very Jazz like.

Cord tone soloing is a matter of exploring pitch collections over a given chord. A common thing that I do with homework when I'm teaching Chord Tone Soloing is give my students a selection of notes and have them "map" out what notes cause tension and resolution with the chord, and then change those chords with the same pitch collection of notes. Its a very organic way for students to get a "feel" for the strong tones, while understanding what notes are working and why, as the chords are changed.

It takes a bit of practice, but because it has a specific focus, it really works. They are focused upon exploring the values of the different pitch collections.

I don't know how fluid you are with notes on the neck, or understanding all your chord tones past the triad stage, or inclusive of them, so I cannot tell you that you have all that you need to move into this area without tripping or stumbling. For example when you play an interval of a 4th against the root, do you know what that is and what it does? I don't know if you do.

Best,

Sean
#3
Quote by Sean0913
Are you talking about chord tone soloing or chordal melody soloing? Chord Melody is very Jazz like.

Cord tone soloing is a matter of exploring pitch collections over a given chord. A common thing that I do with homework when I'm teaching Chord Tone Soloing is give my students a selection of notes and have them "map" out what notes cause tension and resolution with the chord, and then change those chords with the same pitch collection of notes. Its a very organic way for students to get a "feel" for the strong tones, while understanding what notes are working and why, as the chords are changed.

It takes a bit of practice, but because it has a specific focus, it really works. They are focused upon exploring the values of the different pitch collections.

I don't know how fluid you are with notes on the neck, or understanding all your chord tones past the triad stage, or inclusive of them, so I cannot tell you that you have all that you need to move into this area without tripping or stumbling. For example when you play an interval of a 4th against the root, do you know what that is and what it does? I don't know if you do.

Best,

Sean


No, not talking about chord soloing or chord melody. This is something newer than that called chord scale soloing, which according to descriptions I've read is chord soloing but also adding the tensions in the chord. Obviously this is more for jazz as it has more complex chords with interesting tensions, whereas rock tensions are pretty simple.

I'm trying to spice up my solos and incorporate different colors, both for rock and jazz.
#4
Quote by Sean0913
I don't know how fluid you are with notes on the neck, or understanding all your chord tones past the triad stage


Ok so since you're a teacher I'll ask for a clarification. I thought the chord tones were the ones in the triad and all the notes added to them to add color are tensions. So the chord tones are the triad and NOT the tensions. We might be talking about the same thing.