#1
Hello guys i want to ask a question. if the guitarist plays only power chords say in Dm he plays D-Bb-F-D. can i just use the root & the 5th for the notes or can i add the 3rd or even the 7th notes if I were to create a bassline for it?
#2
do whatever you want. if it sounds good do it. if not dont.
My name is Greg, use it.

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#3
Quote by bassman10101
do whatever you want. if it sounds good do it. if not dont.

Pretty much this...

Just play, dude. I rarely follow the guitar... i'm a motown-schoooled bassist, and my lines are always on point with the drums to drive the beat forward... with subtle fills to accentuate the vocal lines. A little tasteful flare here and there... But still usually following within the chords the guitarist plays... but not always... I dunno.

Too much theory = dull and dreary.
"Punk Rock should mean freedom, liking and accepting anything that you like, as sloppy as you want, as long as it's good and has passion."
#4
Quote by Din of Win
Pretty much this...

Just play, dude. I rarely follow the guitar... i'm a motown-schoooled bassist, and my lines are always on point with the drums to drive the beat forward... with subtle fills to accentuate the vocal lines. A little tasteful flare here and there... But still usually following within the chords the guitarist plays... but not always... I dunno.

Too much theory = dull and dreary.



+infinity

If you wanna hear a cool bassline that doesnt follow the guitars, listen to "Dead Man's Diary" by Quo Vadis. Also "Crystal Planet" by Joe Satriani.
#5
You could use all of that, and still make a bitchin bass line, but if the guitar is using power chords, then you will have to"define the chord" using thirds. Example: minor chords have a flat third.

But at the end of the day, it only matters if it sounds good.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#6
Theory really shouldn't be seen as a dreary thing at all. It doesn't dictate creativity, or some perceived lack of or whatever, it just describes it. Theory is about communication, not regimentation.

TS, you could use 2nds or 4ths if you wanted as well- a well placed and chosen note against a guitar chord can really define the mood of the bar. Jam it out, try things. Don't underestimate chromaticism- if you can make the chromatic scale sound good, you're doing alright!
#7
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Theory really shouldn't be seen as a dreary thing at all. It doesn't dictate creativity, or some perceived lack of or whatever, it just describes it. Theory is about communication, not regimentation.


Yeah, okay... this.

I spoke too soon.

It's just a bit irritating. I'm in that mid-20's range where a lot of the guys i play with are music-school grads and they get so stuck on adhering to thory that their creativity suffers, thus the song suffers, thusthus the band suffers.


Theory AND creativity, a powerful musician make.
"Punk Rock should mean freedom, liking and accepting anything that you like, as sloppy as you want, as long as it's good and has passion."
#9
no. your bassline can imply the quality of the chord by hitting the third and seventh.

for example if the chords are G5-E5-C5-D5 theory would tell you most likely to play G major E minor C major and D major (possibly with a flat 7th depending on how bluesy you want it to sound).

so know in keys which chords are major/minor/diminished/whatever. be able to identify seconday dominants even if just written as power chords. (for example if it went G5-E5-A5-D5, the E5 would probably be an E7 "E G# B D")

but also to be a great bassist and come up with good lines, transcribe transcribe transcribe. you don't HAVE to write it down. but you do have to figure out the line by ear note for note and think about WHY it works theoretically.

you have to be able to sit down and look at a chord progression and say "chuck rainey would play it like this *bass line* but jamerson would do this *bass line* but colin moulding would most likely do this *bass line*"

internalize the sound and techniques of the guys you like to listen to. the key is to look for great bands, not great bass players. when people look for great bass players they find people like jaco and victor wooten and stu hamm. those guys do what they do well, and i respect that, but if you want to find someone to idolize just find a great band. because at the heart of every great band is a great bass player. there has to be otherwise it wouldn't be a great band.

if i were you i'd pick up ed fuqua's Walking Bassics. will you walk? probably not. but there's valuable information in there which can be applied to any genre. but basically as ed friedland puts it in his book (also a good one) there is really only about three things you can really do for a bassline: chordal, scalar, chromatic.

so to get from D to Bb to F to D as you said, in eighth notes (assuming its punk for some reason)

  D5              Bb5                F5                D5
G-------------2---|-----------------|-----------------|-----------------
D---------3-----3-|-8-8-8-8-7-6-5-4-|-3---3-----------|-----------------
A-5-5-5-5---5-----|-----------------|---------0---3-0-|-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-
E-----------------|-----------------|---1---1---1-----|-----------------


that chromaticism is actually kinda shitty from the Bb to the F. but whatever. i'm moreso just trying to show it rather than actually write a good bassline.
#DTWD