#1
Well, what I really mean by that is strutting around, doing the odd powerslide (or duck walk if you'd prefer), making a complete fool of yourself... And making strange sex faces like these...

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Seriously though, I think one of the main reasons that fresh, up and coming bands get a hard time getting noticed, is much more to do with them not entertaining people than anything else. I know the music is supposed to be more important but the truth is, the majority of people want something to look at if they're about to stand in the same spot for more than two hours. I know I do when I go to see bands, why not be polite and do the same? But yeah, the question I'm really asking is does anybody have like a bag of moves they like to perform on stage?
Last edited by Alkaline 64 at Jun 28, 2011,
#3
It depends what music your into, if your into light or classic rock that is just a few chords and riffs strung together then you really need to have good stage presence but if your more into technical prog metal ect then asside from the odd headbang at a breakdown your music should be interesting enough for you to remain more or less static

Personally im a big fan of bands like Animals as Leaders, Periphery, The human abstract ect. very tech stuff and every time iv seen them live the guitarists/bassist have preatty much just played an epic set from where they started, they have no need to jump about and throw their guitars about.

Im also a fan of Enter shikari and Deftones, which have a lot more simple songs (just as good though) and fit the sort of image of smashing shit up and making the crowd go mad at every song!
Last edited by mr7string at Jun 28, 2011,
#4
^ Agreed.

I think it would be a little harder to play technically if you were swinging yourself about at the same time.
#5
Quote by Alkaline 64
does anybody have like a bag of moves they like to perform on stage?


My and my bandmates came up with alot of choreographed routines we used onstage. During some songs, we would predetermine where we would stand and what we would do at specific parts. Say for instance, the bassist would play standing directly next to the singer during the verse, while the guitarist would take up his spot during the chorus. While we did that, we did our various struts and poses. During solos and freestyles, the other band-mates would leave the stage for the soloist, unless its a group jam. I have a hard time focusing on moving around during solos, so aside from minimal body swaying to the rhythm, I stand in one spot for the most part. It can be a good thing though, people will think your making it look easy.

As long as your just trying to move around you'll be surprised at what you can come up with. Once, while me and the bassist were playing a song, we acted like we 'gunned down' our vocalist with our guitars. Totally improvised, the vocalist caught onto what we were doing and he just kinda collapsed slowly to the floor. Another time, when my band was performing a mellow song, we all just randomly decided to sit down at the edge of the stage w/ our instruments and play. The audience thought that was pretty cool.
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#6
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#7
^

If you have a wireless gutiar/bass pack, going and walking around the crowd when you can is always a good one and a favourite of mine. (Depends on where the gig is and how the audience is watching) Add a bit to it and try and get people to dance while you're out there as well.
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#8
I'm in a band that's playing a pretty significant show soon, so this is actually pretty helpful for my band. I try to move constantly (point at people, jump offstage, do some improv solos, headbang, run around on stage, be a dick to our drummer by standing and pretending to hump his drumset) but the rest of the band is... static. It's dragging us down a bit, actually...
#9
Hold your guitar or bass to your head like Lemmy does and shoot the crowd. That's always fun.

The best thing you can do to learn is spend a couple hours on Youtube watching bands play live. See what they do.
I learn most of my stage stuff from Venom. They have a great stage presence.
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#10
I never pre-determine anything. I love the idea of spontaneity in my gigs. It makes it a unique experience for the audience, yourself, and your band.
I mean, I'm only in a covers band which makes it hard to have serious presence, it all has a touch of irony in it. (You can't play Chuck Berry without wanting to duck walk now can you? ...not that my band has accepted the idea of doing any Chuck Berry stuff yet. )
But the main acts of stage presence have to come from a desire to interact with the crowd. I mean, playing guitar behind your head or with your teeth is all good and entertaining, but what makes a person love a band, is when they interact with the crowd in what seems to be an original way.

Like a good example, at the last gig (with the band I mentioned) I had, the crowd were dead through our first set, and it looked like the audience were all middle aged+ (which they were), so I was a bit frustrated, anyway, second set, we get to Superstition on our setlist, loooads of people start dancing, which made me fairly happy, so the minute I could step away from my pedal board I jumped off the stage and started dancing with them. This seems quite average, but to my surprise, the bassist mus have seen me going for this and almost at the same time came down with me. People were loving for some reason.

It's all about keeping the audience involved, afterall, especially if you're an originals band, it's all about the audience.

Also, to those who said that if you're playing technical stuff there's no need (or it's not possible) to have a bit of stage presence: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LEAtk6moKtw
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#11
Stage presence is just like improving a solo. You should have your "bag of tricks" and throw them out as you see fit. Rehearsed choreography would be extremely useful if your entire band is doing stuff at once and you need to keep yourselves from running into each other, but besides that, you need to react to how the crowd is acting.

The main rule about maintaining strong stage presence is to watch the crowd; understand what they're doing and play off of that.
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#12
Oh, also, if you want to do some like whole band choreography, you should definitely look at some Japanese bands!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7JMGO3pwJ6Y
This is a good example, note the synchronised movements and stuff.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OZHL74U7K4U
And here there's some synchronised jumping and in the second song some switching positions on stage and stuff. Though with this band you get a better insight into their choreography on the hour long video of them which is on youtube...but unless you're an Aicle. fanboy like me you probably won't want to watch that.
#13
Quote by Attenuare
My and my bandmates came up with alot of choreographed routines we used onstage.


You in a boy band?? lol

I don't know why but I absolutely hate when I see a band do anything more than head bang together at any given time. And to me atleast a lot of the "choreographed" moves look absolutely stupid.


OP, stage presence is very very important thing when you are playing a live show. A show is meant to be entertaining, if a patron didn't want to be entertained they could just stay home and listen to your song there on their Ipod. They are paying their money for an experience and it's you job as a entertainer and musician to give them that. The second you step on a stage you are an entertainer.

Moves:
Big exaggerated movements work best, jumping at the top of build ups, power stances, spinning guitars, interacting with your band mates on stage (can't stress that enough, don't distant yourselves from each other). Sometimes our singer will grab a drum stick and nail the hell out of the cymbals. Jump off stage, we plant people to carry me around on their shoulders during one of our songs. You can realistically do what ever you want, as long as you put on a show.
Last edited by scguitarking927 at Jun 30, 2011,
#14
It depends what genre you're playing, but one of my biggest inspirations is David Lee Roth. He's got it. Or at least he had it. Also, he was in good shape. Do that, too.

I guess the point is, while being a musician, remember that you also have to be an entertainer. Otherwise, people would just throw on your album at home and grab a bowl of ice cream.
#15
I play slightly complex guitar parts while singing, so I can't do much when I play live. However, I tend to exaggerate my movements during breakdowns and instrumental parts, such as:

-strumming really hard
-spreading my feet as far as I can (EPIC POWER STANCE lulz)
-stumbling around a bit
-mild dancing/hopping from foot to foot
-falling to my knees
-jumping on top of and off of equipment (haven't broken any equipment or bones yet)

While singing, I generally just tap my foot, sway, or dance a little. When it comes to crowd interaction, that's generally our lead guitarist's thing.
#16
If you want to see solid crowd interaction between songs, take a look at some of Less Than Jake's live performances. They're really good as an example of banter with the crowd and each other.
#17
Some people just have it - that confidence. Check out Ritchie Blackmore in Rainbow - youtube some videos - the guy just oozes stage presence and he's not particularly mobile.
#18
Quote by kangaxxter
Stage presence is just like improving a solo. You should have your "bag of tricks" and throw them out as you see fit. Rehearsed choreography would be extremely useful if your entire band is doing stuff at once and you need to keep yourselves from running into each other, but besides that, you need to react to how the crowd is acting.

The main rule about maintaining strong stage presence is to watch the crowd; understand what they're doing and play off of that.


i think you should look like your having fun. like with my band, the crowd may not be moving at ALL and inside it makes you angry, but you should still put on the show.
so if the crowd is unresponsive don't let your presence diminish at all. Then you'll be known to have a good show all the time.
#19
1. Get Straplocks.
2. Be a Retard.


Seriously, it's how I got noticed as a bassist when I was playing throughout my high school bands. I'm a studio player now, but it never would have happened if the people I met didn't notice me at my shows.

I actually wrote an entire opinion essay on this very subject.
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