#1
So i've gotten pretty good at some arpeggio-based scales, not quite into sweep picking yet. I actually prefer downstrokes with hammer-ons and pull-offs.

But anyway. I was wondering if anybody could give me a second opinion about connecting different types of arpeggios together. I'm not very knowledgeable about key signatures with chords of any kind. I just know what frets go together and work with patterns from there, basing everything off my root notes.

So heres one phrase I do.

D -
A -
F ---------12-13-15-13-12
C ------13-------------------13
G ---15--------------------------
C --------------------------------

Short but good little roll. Sometimes I'll build up with this and gain momentum.
And then I wanna transition to something like this.

D --16-13----------------------15-11-------------------------------
A ----------------------------------------------------------------------
F ---------17-13----------------------15 11------------------------
C ----------------15~~~~~~--------------13~~~~~~~~~
G ---------------------------------------------------------------------
C ---------------------------------------------------------------------

And try to work it down to...

D -----------------------------------------------------------------
A ------------------------------------------------------------------
F -------------13-17-13-----------------14-18-14-------------
C ------13-17----------17-13----14-18----------18-14------
G - 15-------------------------16--------------------------------
C ------------------------------------------------------------------

And do that same pattern on different root notes.
I really just wanna master all the inbetweens. I can find ways to connect all of this and have full songs made up. But I would like some different insight into connecting shapes and patterns like these.
Last edited by wes_malick at Jun 28, 2011,
#2
Learn music theory so you actually know what you are doing.

Patterns and arpeggio shapes aren't going to do anything for you unless you actually know how to apply them. I would suggest learning how the major/minor scales are created and how to pull arpeggios (and learn what arpeggios actually are) from them so you can make your own progressions.
#3
well i've not even been playing for a year and always stick to the concept that there arent wrong notes, just wrong patterns.

And i've looked into different parts of music theory but don't always have time to study, nor do I wanna study. I like learning on my own. And I usually don't care where my music stands as far as theory, but its more based off of playing by ear and experimenting. I know what sounds good and what doesnt, at least to what I wanna hear.

so idk if you actually played the tab or just looked at it, but either way - what kind of scales am i playing in? and is there anything wrong with what I'm doing?
#4
Not trying to be an ass but you kind of contradict yourself. You want to learn on your own and play by ear without theory, yet you ask what scales you are using and how to connect them.

If you don't want to learn theory and play by ear, why don't you use your ear and figure it out yourself?

I recommended learning the basics of theory so you can do this kind of stuff yourself and not have to ask on a forum how to connect arpeggios.
#5
Just looking for a 2nd opinion you ****. I just got back on this site to ask a simple question and you wanna be all bitter about it.

And you still didnt answer any questions for me, so what good are you?

I wanted to know what scale it was in because I obviously play in scales, but I don't know what they are by term, only by shape. I would like to identify when I go from minor to major or to diminished, whatever, so I can become better acquainted with the fretboard and work on transitions.
#6
"Learn music theory so you actually know what you are doing."
...(and learn what arpeggios actually are)...

Yeah dude, get off your ****in high horse.
#7
I dident quite get your question, but if you want to make arpeggio progressions you should study chord progressions. then when it comes to switch between arpeggios it´s just a matter of practice, use slides to come into a new arpeggio, also use tapping, legato etc. Try it!

I´m sorry if this wasent what you where looking for.

EDIT: You don´t have to be a jerk to Ibz120, after all. He was trying to help you, and you just bash him. I agree with him on the theory thing, just sayin.
#8
Quote by wes_malick
Just looking for a 2nd opinion you ****. I just got back on this site to ask a simple question and you wanna be all bitter about it.

And you still didnt answer any questions for me, so what good are you?

I wanted to know what scale it was in because I obviously play in scales, but I don't know what they are by term, only by shape. I would like to identify when I go from minor to major or to diminished, whatever, so I can become better acquainted with the fretboard and work on transitions.

Then you need to stop being a jerk and learn your theory, there's no way round it. If you want to be able to identify things then you need to know what they are in the first place, and the only way you'll do that is by learning your notes, learning your intervals and learning your theory.

You asked a simple question and you got a simple, correct answer.

...and as punishment for you being mean I'm moving this to MT
Actually called Mark!

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#9
Lol man are you one of those people who think "I don't want to know theory, I'll play with pure emotions and ear", well then you're an idiot. Everyone knows at least a bit of theory.

With some basic theory, you could make up 100s of your own arpeggio shapes.

Also no need to be a dick you uneducated piece of shit. If you want something from someone, it's common courtesy not to insult them. A ****ing guitar god who's been playing for a year. Lool. Listen to yourself man. Hope your guitar breaks and you get carpal tunnel you ****.
#10
Sickz helped more, so thank you. I didnt really think of that.

And he had a condescending effect with his words. so i dont really care.
#11
hahahahaha NO im not one of those, but if it sounds right and it fits then its good.
so who the **** are you now?

Anyway...

I probably already know basic theory since I can come up with pretty intricate shapes already. I just don't know how to put it into language or sheet music.

And he came off bitter towards me - which is why I was bitter to begin with. If I had no idea what I was doing by now I'da gave up prolly.

And. Im sorry I'm so uneducated about music. I never sat down in a class room to learn it, I've always progressed on my own. So im soooooooooo sorry for not fitting in with the crowd but all I wanted was some decent feedback since most guitarists that i've played with dont get what im tryin to say.

But this thread was completely pointless for the most part. Thanks.
Last edited by wes_malick at Jun 29, 2011,
#12
Piszczel, wash your tounge with a soap. You aint really better yourself if you get back at someone like that.
#14
Quote by wes_malick
hahahahaha NO im not one of those, but if it sounds right and it fits then its good.
so who the **** are you now?

Anyway...

I probably already know basic theory since I can come up with pretty intricate shapes already. I just don't know how to put it into language or sheet music.

And he came off bitter towards me - which is why I was bitter to begin with. If I had no idea what I was doing by now I'da gave up prolly.

And. Im sorry I'm so uneducated about music. I never sat down in a class room to learn it, I've always progressed on my own. So im soooooooooo sorry for not fitting in with the crowd but all I wanted was some decent feedback since most guitarists that i've played with dont get what im tryin to say.

But this thread was completely pointless for the most part. Thanks.

You're on a forum dedicated to music theory, what do you think would happen? Learning theory is completely possible on your own. I did it. I never sat in a classroom to learn this stuff. There is no good reason to not learn theory.

Music theory aren't just words and concepts on a page. If you internalize what you learn, they become much more. Practicing and applying the music theory as you learn it helps you out in the long run. A major third interval isn't just four half steps up from the root, I know how it sounds like. An Emadd9 chord isn't just root, minor third, fifth, ninth. I know what it sounds like and what feelings it evokes in me. Music theory has much more benefits than "drawbacks." Not only will you know what you are doing, you can apply your knowledge when you need to. Say you want a certain sound. Music theory will help streamline your search for it. Theory itself isn't dictating what you play, you are. You're just using theory as a tool. It also gives you a common language to communicate with other musicians.

But it doesn't seem you're willing to learning. Your loss. Your first post says "I can find ways to connect all of this and have full songs made up. But I would like some different insight into connecting shapes and patterns like these." That something different is music theory. No need to act like a child about it.
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#16
Umm... Yeah...

Learn theory. It can only help.

also, you don't need to learn it in a classroom, I've never taken a class, and know much more than some of the people (where I'm from) who have.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

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#17
Quote by wes_malick
I probably already know basic theory since I can come up with pretty intricate shapes already. I just don't know how to put it into language or sheet music.


then you don't know basic theory. intricacy is irrelevant -- just a term to make you feel better about yourself. clearly you can speak english at a skillful level, but could you tell me what a gerund or a predicate are? what about nominalization? there are rhetorical questions, of course -- my point being that you can speak english, but you don't know much about it. (watch you be a language major and completely ace this)

i learned what i know on my own, so don't give me that classroom bullcrap. people here know that i know what i'm talking about, regardless of what they think of me as a person.

you're only denying yourself progression in your abilities if you choose not to learn. and keep in mind that sweep runs and metal is not the be-all of guitar -- there's far much more than that. someday you'll realize that (and i'm not talking down to you, serious guitarists always realize that and then they start shitting themselves when they realize how limited they are -- i was the same way), and you'll realize that theory is going to make everything easier for you.

the more you know, the better off you are. no other way about it.

oh, also, make sure you understand that those of us who are promoting theory are not suggesting it in place of an ear. ideally, both should be used in conjunction. in fact, we suggest further developing your ear so that you can analyze what you hear without even seeing it written or playing it out -- but that comes later. just make sure you know that you get the most out of both -- they're not intended to be substitutes for each other.
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Last edited by AeolianWolf at Jun 29, 2011,
#18
Here's an example of how to connect arpeggio's, and create some direction while doing it...not metal, but arpeggio's are arpeggio's...

this is midi audio of the tab/notation...http://test.mikedodge.com/mvdmusic/Lessons/ChromResolvJazzLess1/jazzlesson1.mid (slower: http://test.mikedodge.com/mvdmusic/Lessons/ChromResolvJazzLess1/jazzlesson1-100bpm.mid)

Last edited by MikeDodge at Jun 29, 2011,
#19
Dont be an ass about their advice to learn BASIC theory


http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html


those are the basics you need to know(disregard the part about modes), no one is going to type all that stuff again so you could see that those "arpeggio shapes" make no sense

read up it's useful
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#21
Learning basic theory is the best answer to your question tbh. Too bad if its not what you wanted to hear, that music takes some hard work and study. Dont get too worked up because we answered your question.
#23
Quote by wes_malick
AeolianWolf - Thank you for a legit reply. lol


The rest of us gave "legitimate" answers. One of us even gave a link. Learning basic theory will only help you in the long run.

Also, your kind of being a jerk.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.