#1
I was wondering if any of you have had problems with zildian cymbals breaking? Im in two bands and both my drummers have broken zildian cymbals but not any of their others.

Is this a common problem?
#2
Two of my friends had their cheap-ass Zildjian crashes break, but on the other hand my friend's brother hasn't broken any of his cheap-ass Zildjians. On the other other hand, I know a couple guys who have been using their expensive Zildjians for decades.
#3
Nope, can't say I have. About 2 years ago I bought a Zildjian ride off my teacher, and he had it since the 70's...40 years. Now I know it's a ride, but he's big into Jazz, and would often times use only the ride and hats, and crash on the ride (not incredibly hard, more to accentuate certain notes). I use it on and off, and when I play on it, I'm not afraid to hold back because of its elderly status. I use primarily Zildjian, and have never broken one, and I'm a heavy hitter (with proper technique* key word).
#4
Zildjians (or really any other company) aren't known for having a high break frequency... more individual lines, for example the Meinl Byzance Traditionals are made out of thinner materials compared to their other cymbals so the risk of them cracking is a bit higher.

It's entirely possibly to just have those cymbals set-up at a stupid angle-- if they have the crashes/chinas really high and flat, then hitting it will have an effect similar to dropping it on the edge. I don't know if that's true or not, but that would be my guess. If not, then meh. Coincidence.
#5
I had this problem a few years back using their ZHT line. I somehow managed to go through 5 cymbals in under a year. Luckily they kept replacing them for free cause they were breaking so frequently. I upgraded to A customs and haven't had any problems since.
#6
I think most broken cymbals are due to bad technique. Hitting them too hard, at the wrong angle, or simply mounting them wrong can all break even the best of cymbals. If you have constant problems with cymbals, even cheap ones, you need to look at what you are doing wrong because you are bound to be doing something.
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#7
Quote by CorduroyEW
I think most broken cymbals are due to bad technique. Hitting them too hard, at the wrong angle, or simply mounting them wrong can all break even the best of cymbals. If you have constant problems with cymbals, even cheap ones, you need to look at what you are doing wrong because you are bound to be doing something.


There is definetely something to be said about bad technique buggering up cymbals. Having said that, i do think ZBT crashes do have a problem with their strength. Even having sorted my technique i still managed to crack a zbt. I think they're just crap cymbals really.
EH


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#8
Never had a problem with Zildjians, though I know guys and seen guys crack and break cymbals. But they're literally throwing their body weight into smashing the damned things. I think it's just down to technique, altough I know that sometimes a few bad cymbals get out and just some guys get really unlucky with breaking them. However, I still maintain it's technique.

I normally have my cymbals flat except for my 2nd crash and the crash I ride on, I tilt them in at a slight angle so i'm not crashing right on the edge.
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#10
Starting off you should have the cymbal mounted "safely." Stands usually come with a rubber sleeve-thing that goes on the stands screw-thing to keep the cymbal from touching the metal stand, use that. Also don't over tighten the nut, keep it rather loose so the cymbal isn't restricted and can freely move. Don't set your cymbals at a crazy angle, or flat (unless you have them rather low)...you don't want to strike directly on the edge, you wanna get a little edge + some of the "bow". Hitting just the edge is a definite crack in no time, all the force to that one small area...comparable to dropping it . When you do hit it, kinda hit across it, don't come directly down through it. "Glancing Blow" is the term a lot of people use. Remember cymbals are also an instrument, like drums...they're not meant to be pounded on constantly, don't forget dynamics. Take the size and weight into account too, you wouldn't want to hit a heavy ride or super light cymbal like you would a crash.
#11
Quote by corrda00
Thanks for all the help.

Just curious, Ive never had a lot of formal traingn (other than snare drumming)
What is the proper techique for crashing?
The stuff AmericanZero said is spot on. Basically, you want to make sure that the cymbal is secured tightly, but also loose enough so that it can move around freely, and that it's easy to hit. I don't have very long arms so mine are pretty low. As for actually hitting it, you want to hit the body of the cymbal, NOT the edge-- hitting on the edge has an effect similar to dropping it on the edge.

Also, don't dig into the cymbal, just strike it and let the stick rebound.
#12
All the top Zildjian cymbals I've owned have lasted a long time, even the thin and wispy ones - though sometimes they are the ones that last the longest. However, the cheaper models I've had have yet to last more than six months. Sabian and Meinl make higher quality cheap cymbals, in my opinion, as do Paiste.
#13
I purchased a zildjian zbt cymbal set it came with hi hats, splash cymbal, and crash ride. They are pretty decent sounding but both cymbals cracked after not even 2 years. I still play with the hats though they sound pretty good. I have an 8' zildjian a fast splash that has never failed me after 6 years.. I guess the zbts aren't really worth getting in the long run.
#14
Ive had a ZIldjian A series crash ride since february of 2011 and its not giving me any issues.