#1
Hey guys,
I'm having trouble trying to bend the strings to the correct pitch. Whenever I bend the strings half step or full step, it is always out of tune, almost always. I hear this whenever I record myself playing a song. I can't hear the vibration whenever I am playing the guitar without the camera.

Any reasons why?
#2
Hmmm... Maybe practice bends with a chromatic tuner.
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#4
If your bends are out of tune then you aren't bending up a half or full step, that's your problem right there. By definition a bend is a change in pitch, therefore you have to first be able to recognise the pitch you're aiming for, then hit it when you bend - how are you gauging your bends, by the sound or simply by the distance you move the string?

You probably need to do more work on recognising the target pitches, a tuner won't help all that much because it won't necessarily help you recognise the pitches, you may simply end up relying too much on the tuner to recognise the pitch for you.
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#5
Pick a note.

Play the note 1 or 2 frets up.

Play the original note, then bend it up until it's the same pitch.

Keep doing that.
#6
If you cannot hear correctly whether you are in tune, play a note, hum the note, then bend up to the note. You will immediately recognize the correct pitch this way.
Yeah
#7
Quote by triface
Pick a note.

Play the note 1 or 2 frets up.

Play the original note, then bend it up until it's the same pitch.

Keep doing that.

this. hours and hours of this.
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#8
Try unison bends too, it's easiest on the on the g and b strings.

For example, fret the 7th fret (d) on the g string and the 5th fret (e) on the b string, then bend the d note one step up to an e.
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#9
For some reason, I can't hear the pitch change during a song but when I practice bending using the techniques above, I can hear the difference(vibration) clearly.
#10
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#11
Quote by {Transformer}
For some reason, I can't hear the pitch change during a song but when I practice bending using the techniques above, I can hear the difference(vibration) clearly.

You won't hear a vibration when you bend a single note. Those vibrations are known as harmonic beats, and they occur when two pitches are slightly mismatched. The further apart the two pitches are the faster the beats will be, the closer the pitches are the slower the beats will be, and when the pitches are the same there'll be no beats.
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#13
triface above has the right idea.

Also, how well do you sing in-tune a-capella? You should be able to carry a tune accurately, even if your voice range or tone isn't amazing.

Some of it is also the memorization of the feel of the strings.

For example, with a "pre-bend", you first bend the note without playing. Then you pick it and let the string go back down to normal tension. For that, you can't listen your way up to pitch as the note is bending. You have to get it right in your hands before you play.

But the two go hand in hand. It's a matter of listening, ear skills, and developing hand memorization as to what the bends feel like to produce any given result.