#1
Is it uncommon to see a drummer using something like a Roland TD-8 (just an example) for gigs?

In your opinion, does it look nerdy?
Personally, I think e-kits such as a Roland TD-8 look awesome...however, I think the bass drum and the frame look dinky...I don't know. Maybe I just get the impression that everybody else probably thinks it's dinky and it influences my opinion.
#2
I've never seen it in my life. However direct input drums could become more common with software like superior 2.0! In fact I've heard of bands using triggers live as well.
#3
I mean, I hear bands use triggers and mesh pads and all that...
Do people decide to not use an E-kit, or is it not viable?
#4
I've seen E-kits being used live, it does look a little nerdy but it depends on the venue really. I wouldn't be against the idea of using one live if it seemed like a better option
Neo Evil11
Quote by jambi_mantra
They let black people on Fox now?

They also let white people into the KFC and the NBA now.
#5
You should avoid using an E-kit live unless you've got a decent PA system; I went to watch a band a couple of months back and the speaker being used to amplify the electronic kit kept cutting out, leaving the sound of the band drumless. The stupid thing is that the other band's drummer had a Pearl master's that my friend's band's drummer was using so he could have used that. But nope, he kept soldiering on with his crappy electronic kit which was set up to sound like an acoustic kit and wasn't working when he had a top of the line acoustic kit he could have used like right next to him on the stage
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
Last edited by eddiehimself at Jun 29, 2011,
#6
I saw Aeon Flux open for Devin Townsend in March, and they used an electric drumkit. E-kits have a huge flaw when performing live: The sound of the sticks hitting the plastic of the kit. I was way in front and I kept on hearing the "tokka tokka" of the plastic, even over the PA of the venue. It was very distracting.
#7
Quote by CoreysMonster
I saw Aeon Flux open for Devin Townsend in March, and they used an electric drumkit. E-kits have a huge flaw when performing live: The sound of the sticks hitting the plastic of the kit. I was way in front and I kept on hearing the "tokka tokka" of the plastic, even over the PA of the venue. It was very distracting.


I'm amazed you could hear that over the PA.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#8
See, now I have no way of playing an acoustic kit because of where I live.
I don't want to play an E-kit 24/7 and then have to switch to an acoustic for 1 day. It seems like that'd lead to inconsistency in playing since I'd be used to an e-kit. I'd rather just use my e-kit for everything.
#9
This is what the Pearl e-pro comes in to play. Its an electronic kit that looks like an acoustic. Not the best e-kit on the market, actually far from it, but they are not overly expensive and will do what you need it to do.
#10
Far from being the best for $2,500? Exactly what price range would the best be?

Also, what reason would one have to buy something better? As long as it can play and record flawlessly, what more do you need?
#11
Quote by OGHotWing
Also, what reason would one have to buy something better? As long as it can play and record flawlessly, what more do you need?


Decent dynamics, realistic sounding attack, a range of sensory inputs for rimshot/click/choke sounds etc etc. I don't want to sound rude or anything, but i don't really think there is much point in saying this; it's like saying "as long as i can play my £50 guitar perfectly well, why do i need a more expensive one?" Well maybe you don't, but it will probably sound considerably better and feel nicer to play as well.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#12
Quote by eddiehimself
Decent dynamics, realistic sounding attack, a range of sensory inputs for rimshot/click/choke sounds etc etc. I don't want to sound rude or anything, but i don't really think there is much point in saying this; it's like saying "as long as i can play my £50 guitar perfectly well, why do i need a more expensive one?" Well maybe you don't, but it will probably sound considerably better and feel nicer to play as well.


High end electric kits do those, and i'm sure the Zildjian Gen-16 cymbals can do those too.

Actually all I wanted to say was my £40 Westbury Les Paul Custom (SG Custom), after I tinkered with it, sounds and plays better than a Les Paul Studio I used to own...

But you're looking at parting with an arm and a leg if you want those kinds of E-kits which is the big problem.
Neo Evil11
Quote by jambi_mantra
They let black people on Fox now?

They also let white people into the KFC and the NBA now.
#13
Quote by Niiko
High end electric kits do those, and i'm sure the Zildjian Gen-16 cymbals can do those too.

Actually all I wanted to say was my £40 Westbury Les Paul Custom (SG Custom), after I tinkered with it, sounds and plays better than a Les Paul Studio I used to own...

But you're looking at parting with an arm and a leg if you want those kinds of E-kits which is the big problem.


That is what i was saying. Of course you get those decent features in a high end kit. Unfortunately when someone says "sounds and records flawlessley", it's difficult to know what that actually means in terms of features because i'm sure a £200 ION e-kit could "sound and record flawlessely" but that doesn't mean it's very good.

Sometimes you can get lucky with cheap guitars, and to be fair i wouldn't say the modern gibson studios are really the best of guitars. My original point with the guitars thing though was that you might not NEED a better guitar than something that costs £50 but it might be a nice idea if you want something really good. Anyway, i think it's pretty clear that when you're talking about electronic drumkits because of the technology involved, it's a lot different then talking about different types of guitars because imo what you get really is what you pay for in terms of features.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
Last edited by eddiehimself at Jun 30, 2011,
#14
Quote by eddiehimself
Decent dynamics, realistic sounding attack, a range of sensory inputs for rimshot/click/choke sounds etc etc. I don't want to sound rude or anything, but i don't really think there is much point in saying this; it's like saying "as long as i can play my £50 guitar perfectly well, why do i need a more expensive one?" Well maybe you don't, but it will probably sound considerably better and feel nicer to play as well.


But there is a difference between getting what you need, and spending an arm and a leg for something that is overkill.
Keep in mind that I'm still a noob with drum gear, and I'm just making assumptions. I'm not arguing or anything...I'm just trying to gain knowledge before I spend money.
It seems like that e-pro does everything one would need it to. I don't care to have 5 million different sound effects if I'm not going to use them all and etc.

To put it into guitar terms from my point of view...that's like telling somebody to buy a 7-string instead of a 6-string because a 7-string does everything a 6-string does, plus more. But if you never intend on using the 7th string, what's the point?
#15
Quote by CoreysMonster
I saw Aeon Flux open for Devin Townsend in March, and they used an electric drumkit. E-kits have a huge flaw when performing live: The sound of the sticks hitting the plastic of the kit. I was way in front and I kept on hearing the "tokka tokka" of the plastic, even over the PA of the venue. It was very distracting.


Thats where the mesh pads on E Kits are nice.
Not taking any online orders.
#16
Quote by OGHotWing
But there is a difference between getting what you need, and spending an arm and a leg for something that is overkill.
Keep in mind that I'm still a noob with drum gear, and I'm just making assumptions. I'm not arguing or anything...I'm just trying to gain knowledge before I spend money.
It seems like that e-pro does everything one would need it to. I don't care to have 5 million different sound effects if I'm not going to use them all and etc.


You generally get a lot of sound effects on most e-kits regardless of price. If you're still on about the TD-8 then i very much doubt it's "overkill" to buy one.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#17
Quote by eddiehimself
I'm amazed you could hear that over the PA.

I was standing literally 2 feet away from the drummer. I doubt anybody else heard it, but it was one of those things you just can't unhear anymore, and it ruined the band's performance for me.
#18
I saw once at a resteraunt, it seemed to work well, and for their style of music it seemed fitting, its not like they were trying to look like badasses or anything like that.

....however, it would be incredibly foolish and lame to use one for a metal/hard rock gig o.O
#19
Quote by Shayden2008
I saw once at a resteraunt, it seemed to work well, and for their style of music it seemed fitting, its not like they were trying to look like badasses or anything like that.

....however, it would be incredibly foolish and lame to use one for a metal/hard rock gig o.O



..... I've seen it.... Wasn't exactly a pretty thing to watch either. Looked incredibly out of place.... Still worked though as that genre doesn't really have dynamics.... Or atleast the band themselves don't have dynamics
Neo Evil11
Quote by jambi_mantra
They let black people on Fox now?

They also let white people into the KFC and the NBA now.