#2
Sure. If you want to get even better, add fives in there so your fingers get used to stretching around. Things like :
1425 1245 1235 1345 1354 1532 etc.
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#3
yea, they help quite a bit. I use the one from steve vais workout and use it as part of warmup, it's a bit more crazier. was quite annoying to remember (although it does follow a pattern)
#4
Yes, it will increase your technique. The exercise improves your rhythmic sense and develops finger control and dexterity. However, be warned: do not expect a sudden miracle - you will not suddenly feel like the Jesus of Guitar.
Yeah
#5
it will get you better at chromatics.....thats it. everyone seems to think chromatic exercises will somehow make them a better player but it doesnt. if i want to build technique and speed with the pentatonic or diatonic scale, chromatic exercises arent going to really improve those.

that being said, they are useful and i tend to do chromatic things at the start to warm up my picking and fretting hands.
#6
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
it will get you better at chromatics.....thats it. everyone seems to think chromatic exercises will somehow make them a better player but it doesnt. if i want to build technique and speed with the pentatonic or diatonic scale, chromatic exercises arent going to really improve those.


this.

playing chromatics makes you better at playing chromatics.
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#7
Quote by AeolianWolf
this.

playing chromatics makes you better at playing chromatics.


and synchronizing your hands if you're practicing for speed and playing slightly out of your comfort zone (like one should to improve)
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#8
The short answer is yes. The thing is, though, everything you play, if played properly, will increase your playing ability.

EDIT: That being said, you must practice a multitude of things to actually get better unless you plan on getting better at one scale or exercise. To be honest, I'd rather have unlimited flexibility rather than speed. The only way to become more flexible is doing those weird exercises that you've never done before or learning more songs.
Last edited by The.new.guy at Jun 29, 2011,
#9
I'm starting at 45bpm on my metronome 16th notes. At this speed it probably takes an hour to do all the combinations.

If I stick to this will it really increase my technique?


Yes - but I'd cut it down to a few permutations each week, and 15-30 mins a day rather than all every day. Burnout sucks.
#11
Chromatic exercises are good but once you have gotten past finger strength then you should consider looking at hanon exercises. Essentially you are building the same finger strength but the difference is you are also developing your ear to melody and harmony.

Someone nailed it when they said chromatic exercises will make you good at chromatics. Also maybe have a look at Bach, something like gigue in d minor. essentially you are practising all elements of music when you play his pieces. rhythm, harmony, melody, dynamics etc.

all the best man.
#12
Quote by hr113
and synchronizing your hands if you're practicing for speed and playing slightly out of your comfort zone (like one should to improve)


there's a lot more to playing an instrument than synchronization of hands.

playing chromatics gets you better at playing chromatics. if you want to get better at playing, you know, music, you do just that. play music.

he asked two questions. in the title, he asked if doing this will improve his playing. in the post, he asked if it will improve his technique. the answer being that it will probably improve the latter, but will not likely improve the former.
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Last edited by AeolianWolf at Jun 30, 2011,