#1
Ignition picking or pinch harmonics w/e you wana call it.


i can do it and get some very nice squeels but. is there only certain notes you can do it on or can it be done this way on evry note on the fret board?

if not is there some sort of scale which gives u the note positions where it can be used please?


Thanks alot
#2
Not every note has a good pinch harmonic on it (or any at all) but it also depends on whereyou pluck, that can give you different pinch harmonics for a note. i don't know of any chart or anything though sorry
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#4
No but your technique and placing on the strings when you pick can get you some extra tones.
The standard way of doing it where you catch the string with your thumb can get you various harmonics in different places where you pick, just try moving your picking hand backwards and forwards along the string.

Once you found those notes theres a second technique which I use. Basically, when you pick you can hold the pick normally and use the joint/knuckle of your middle finger to catch the string behind your pick. This technique can throw off some different sounding harmonics depending on what fret you do it on. The 3rd and 4th strings sound best in my opinion.
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#5
Quote by nirvanagrunge13
Not every note has a good pinch harmonic on it (or any at all) but it also depends on whereyou pluck, that can give you different pinch harmonics for a note. i don't know of any chart or anything though sorry

Nope, EVERY note has "good" pinch harmonics on it.

Harmonics are a physical fact, they occur at fractions of a strings vibrating length, that means any time you have a vibrating string you have harmonics.

To play a natural harmonic you damp the string at a harmonic node, by definition you only play natural harmonics on an open string so the full length of the string is vibrating, meaning those nodes are fixed.

As soon as you fret a string though all the nodes moves - if you make that vibrating string shorter then halfway along the string isn't going to be the same point as it was for an open string, is it?

Pinch harmonics just mean that you're damping the node at the opposite end of the string, so again for different frets those nodes will move.
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