#1
I bought a new set of strings today because one of my strings broke yesterday. I had never replaced strings before but it went surprisingly well. I replaced every string according to the color of those colored circles at the end of the strings.

...But I had some trouble tuning the A string and it didn't occur to me that I had used the wrong string! So the low E and the A strings have swapped positions. This mistake doesn't surprise me at all since I'm not very good at doing these things by myself.

Is it possible to swap those strings or should I buy a new set of strings?
#3
next time try to ignore the color coding confusion and just string your guitar from fattest string to skinniest string.

edit: get new strings, because if you try to change their positions they are more likely to snap. This is mostly because you already bent the string at the tuners, since the A string tuner is farther away than the E string tuner, the bent part on the string that was on you E string tuner will not be wrapped around the A string tuner and will be stretched freely between the tuner and the nut, making it very likely to snap while tuning or just randomly. Hope you understood all the rubbish.
Last edited by bustapr at Jun 30, 2011,
#4
I think it should be wise to buy a new set (or, if possible, only the lowest strings separately). Since you've rounded the strings around the tuning knobs, it would be pretty messy job getting them out and straight again. Haven't ever tried, though.
#5
Thanks for the thorough advice everyone. I'm going to remove the two strings and I will get myself a new set. From now on, I will check the string thickness instead of color
#6
Dunno if you're still reading these, but for the record: I don't agree with these guys (at least not entirely)

Quote by Munq
I think it should be wise to buy a new set (or, if possible, only the lowest strings separately). Since you've rounded the strings around the tuning knobs, it would be pretty messy job getting them out and straight again. Haven't ever tried, though.
But he doesn't have to get 'em straight -> the strings have all gone curly (I think they call that a "kink") BEHIND the nut so he won't really notice that bump in the string while playing. Wound strings don't tend to snap that easily, unless they're REALLY bent (like they often do right after going through the tuning peg) and since the E string went through a tuning peg that was probably further removed from the nut than the tuning peg it was MEANT to go through (unless this guitar has an inverted headstock) the only string that might be causing some problems is the A string

So anyway, why not give it a shot? The guitar isn't really playable in its current state, so what have you got to lose, really?? Consider this great learning opportunity, cos you'll never make this mistake again, aight? And even if you did "ruin" these strings, you can still use 'em to practice restringing a bit...

While you're at it, why not look into this 'ere stringing technique?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ae7HsWFRdYY

It helps with keeping your guitar in tune. Keep in mind that the MOST IMPORTANT PART of this trick is NOT WRAPPING THE ENTIRE STRING AROUND THE TUNERS -> no matter what material they're made of, strings always stretch out. If you want to keep your guitar from going out of tune you really should cut off the excess string (and after you're done stretch 'em out). The only reason I used to leave the entire string on was because I "wanted to be safe" in the case that I screwed up (much like you in this case, lol ) but after you've done this enough times you'll get more confident...

Oh, and for god's sake: buy an extra pair this time. Even if you do everything properly, there's always a chance of sudden string breakage. Never hurts to have a spair set of fresh strings at hand (and judging from your description of color codings, you're using D'Addario's -> those strings don't start corroding until you unpack 'em)

/] 三方 [\
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Last edited by shwilly at Jun 30, 2011,