#1
Okay well don't think i'm dumb for asking these questions but they have been weighing on my mind for awhile! lol


First off to play if Im playing in the key of E would the relative minor scale be c# harmonic minor?


Second off when you finding out what chords fit in a specific key C major is the only one without sharps and flats right?

for example if i was in the key of E would the chords that fit be:

E Maj - F min - G min - A Maj - B Maj - C Min - D Dim

OR would it be

E Maj - F#Min - G#min - A Maj - B Maj - C#min - D#Dim

The Major Sharp/Flat keys are confusing me a little bit. Hopefully my questions will not confuse anybody!

-Thanks in advance-
#2
The relative minor for E major would be C# minor. C major nor A minor have flats/sharps.

The latter set of chords is correct.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#3
Flibby's right, but just some additional information:

You seem a little confuzzled about harmonic minor/natural minor. Your relative minor to a major key is always a natural minor scale. However, while playing in a minor tonality, it is generally acceptable--perhaps preferable--to fuse elements from the natural, harmonic and melodic minor scales.

If you're confused about the sharp/flats in a key, look up the circle of fifths. It lists keys by number of sharps/flats. Going up a fifth from a certain key will add an additional sharp (or remove a flat), while going down a fifth (aka moving up a fourth) will do the opposite. The diagram helps, it's all over the internet, just google "Circle of Fifths."
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#4
Look up the thread: Sticky: Music Thory FAQ Guide. Explained well.

First off: The sixth in the current major key is always the relative minor. (ex: C major --> a minor) Other way is off course the 3th (c minor --> Eb major). So correct.

Second off: not only C major, a minor too (because of First off)
The second is indeed correct, as Flibo said. If you can read notes it's a lot easier to understand why it is with the sharps and flats. I'll explain using the fret-board on your guitar.

Let's say we're playing in C. And only on the A-string. The corresponding notes:
     +2   +2   +1   +2   +2   +2   +1
A|-3----5----7----8---10---12---14---15--|
   C    D    E    F    G    A    B    C

Notice the number of frets it takes to go to the next note. If it's +2, we call it a whole distance, +1 is a half distance. These distances are valid for every major scale. Writing it down for the E scale you'll get your second scale. Try the same for the minor, with what I said in First off in mind. Mind too that the distance E-F, and B-C is always a half.

Why sharps and no flats? Just so you use every different note. There was a time though that C# was not the same as Db. Now we're not making the differences anymore so it's just to write it down correctly.

Be sure to look up the thread if you want to know more or want it explained different.
lalala
#5
Quote by OptionParalysis
Okay well don't think i'm dumb for asking these questions but they have been weighing on my mind for awhile! lol


First off to play if Im playing in the key of E would the relative minor scale be c# harmonic minor?


Second off when you finding out what chords fit in a specific key C major is the only one without sharps and flats right?

for example if i was in the key of E would the chords that fit be:

E Maj - F min - G min - A Maj - B Maj - C Min - D Dim

OR would it be

E Maj - F#Min - G#min - A Maj - B Maj - C#min - D#Dim

The Major Sharp/Flat keys are confusing me a little bit. Hopefully my questions will not confuse anybody!

-Thanks in advance-



First just learn the chords in C major. C Dm Em F G Am Bdim C . The 6th chord in this scale, or the sixth note you can say is the relative minor. So if you wanted to play in E major just move the C major scale up 4 frets and apply the same concept. This works all the time. You should get Doug Mark's Metal Method dvd on theory. Get the new version and old one. Even a dummy can understand it trust me!