#1
Howdy

So my RG1527 is in the shop for a while and I'm playing my SAS36 instead. I'm noticing that bends are a LOT more difficult on this guitar in comparison to the RG! Even just a normal whole-tone bend gives some difficulty, and a 3 semi-tone bend often causes my fingers to fly off the string.

I'm curious as to why this is. I know most guitars will handle differently, but I didn't expect this much difference in the bends. Both guitars have the same brand and gauge of strings. They have both been "hardtailed" - the RG has a tremol-no and the SAS a good ol' block of wood. They both have the same 25.5" scale necks, but the RG has 24 frets whereas the SAS has 22.

So, any ideas? It feels as if I'm using a higher gauge on the SAS and I can't understand why
#2
it has more to do with string gauge and the action i would think than the guitar itself. But since you said its the same strings, maybe the action is different on each guitar.
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#3
ive noticed that lower end guitars bends are retarded, like I had a low end ibanez and a higher end one... the diffrence was substantial I couldnt explain "why" but I did notice bending a whole step required a much bigger bend on the lower end one.
#4
The action on both guitars is very similar, though I think the SAS's fretboard is rounder than the RG (which is INCREDIBLY flat).

ive noticed that lower end guitars bends are retarded, like I had a low end ibanez and a higher end one... the diffrence was substantial I couldnt explain "why" but I did notice bending a whole step required a much bigger bend on the lower end one.


The SAS36 is the highest model in the current SA range, but you might have a point there- my old GSZ120 was an absolute bitch to bend or play any lead on!


Come to think about it, my RG350 is also a lot easier to bend than this SAS. I just can't figure out why
#5
I doubt that's it since it's pretty obvious, but might be worth mentioning: are both guitars on the same tuning? Lower tunning = less tension = easier bends, kinda like using lower gauge strings.
#6
Quote by Polenguinho
I doubt that's it since it's pretty obvious, but might be worth mentioning: are both guitars on the same tuning? Lower tunning = less tension = easier bends, kinda like using lower gauge strings.


Yeppers, all E standard
#7
how about the frets? worn down at all? taller frets would mean less skin contact and friction against the fretboard. Different fretboard material?
#8
Quote by black_box
how about the frets? worn down at all? taller frets would mean less skin contact and friction against the fretboard. Different fretboard material?


Same fretboard woods, but I think the SAS's frets are smaller and kinda rounder. Could that be the answer?
#9
probably to do with fretboard radius
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