#1
Hey
I've joined a band that plays mostly in Drop D.
So I bought thicker strings (10-52) and put them on, however now the bridge looks like this:



I've looked around on the internets and found out that I was supposed to thighten the screws positioned at the springs. So I did that, but it was not enough. The bridge is still way to high up from the body.



So have I done something wrong, or do I need new springs?
Last edited by and3nlol at Jun 30, 2011,
#2
New springs? Seriously unlikely. Did you tune up an octave or something? There is something very wrong going on there. I really don't think your springs went from functional to completely shot while you went up a gauge.

Check out the 'setting up a floyd' part of the guitar setup sticky.
#4
Quote by and3nlol
Hey

So have I done something wrong, or do I need new springs?


You've done something wrong.

Either do some serious reading on FR setups or get thee hence to a decent guitar tech.
#5
Quote by Roc8995
New springs? Seriously unlikely. Did you tune up an octave or something? There is something very wrong going on there. I really don't think your springs went from functional to completely shot while you went up a gauge.

Check out the 'setting up a floyd' part of the guitar setup sticky.


1. No I tuned to Drop D.

2. Before I changed strings and things were working properly, I screws were not a whole lot looser than they are now. So when the bridge naturally went up when I put on heavier strings I couldn't tighten them all that much. A centimeter (~0.4 inches) perhaps.

(By the way, just to be sure: these are the screws I'm talking about


3. Perhaps I missed something in the sticky thread, but I've looked through it already.
Last edited by and3nlol at Jun 30, 2011,
#6
Umm... this question is so silly that it's outright rude, but just to make sure, you DID re-tune the guitar after adjusting the springs, instead of expecting the baseplate to go back down as you tighten the springs, right? RIGHT?

Now that we've got that out of the way, it still sounds very strange. You could try adding a 4th spring to the equation, but I always find adding springs to be a HUGE bitch.
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#7
Quote by The^Unforgiven
Umm... this question is so silly that it's outright rude, but just to make sure, you DID re-tune the guitar after adjusting the springs, instead of expecting the baseplate to go back down as you tighten the springs, right? RIGHT?


If you mean simply retune the guitar to Drop D again (of course not with fine-tuners) then yes I did that
#8
Your strings are WAY too heavy for drop d, especially on a Floyd Rose. You should be using 48 at the most, you could do it with 46s no problem. My Jackson is in d standard and with 49s and my claw screws aren't even halfway to the body. You should also attatch the 2 outside springs to the middle claw hooks, that adds tension to them.
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Last edited by Metalfan41 at Jun 30, 2011,
#10
Quote by Arby911
You've done something wrong.

Either do some serious reading on FR setups or get thee hence to a decent guitar tech.


Yep that shouldn't happen going from 9s to light tops heavy bottoms should require little or no adjustment.

Looks like the TS tried to change all the strings at once without blocking the bridge 1st

It's way easier to do them one at a time to avoid the train wreck we're seeing now.
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#11
Quote by Willowthewitch
Yep that shouldn't happen going from 9s to light tops heavy bottoms should require little or no adjustment.

Looks like the TS tried to change all the strings at once without blocking the bridge 1st

It's way easier to do them one at a time to avoid the train wreck we're seeing now.


Well, considering that light top heavy bottom strings have the low E, A, and D strings considerably thicker, and considering that the low strings make up the majority of the string tension, it's no surprise that this happened going from .009-.046 to .010-.052, the tension differences are massive, even if it would of been a normal light gauge string set.

All TS needs to do is toss 2 more springs in there and he'll be fine to start adjusting.
#13
you use a whammy bar?

Yes? tune your head lower, then tighten the bridges knobs its like a balancing act

no? (alot effing easier) BLOCK YOUR BRIDGE! its what i did with mine, sounds great, and strings will never! and i mean unless you start to bang the guitar off stuff never go out of tune
#14
Quote by Metalfan41
Your strings are WAY too heavy for drop d, especially on a Floyd Rose. You should be using 48 at the most, you could do it with 46s no problem. My Jackson is in d standard and with 49s and my claw screws aren't even halfway to the body. You should also attatch the 2 outside springs to the middle claw hooks, that adds tension to them.

10-52 isn't WAY too heavy for Drop D, Floyd or not. I used to use them in E Standard and they were fine, and plenty of people use those gauges, with Floyds, without any problems at all.

TS, try putting the springs in an arrowhead layout, so the outer 2 are on the claw right next to the middle one, rather than on the outside lugs of the claw.
Like this;
\|/
Instead of this;
|||

That should help a bit, although I'm not sure it will be enough.
You can buy shorter springs, which will give you a bit more tension.
#15
i'd say add a spring if that doesn't quite fix it add another one, if this doesn't work then you can always looks for stronger springs.
#16
I think it's better have the highest spring tension when tuning a guitar. Tighten the springs fully when putting new strings, then tune it. Then if the bridge is still sinking, then loosen the springs bit by bit and retune until the bridge is parallel and the guitar is in tune. Or is it a wrong method?
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#17
Quote by metalter
I think it's better have the highest spring tension when tuning a guitar. Tighten the springs fully when putting new strings, then tune it. Then if the bridge is still sinking, then loosen the springs bit by bit and retune until the bridge is parallel and the guitar is in tune. Or is it a wrong method?

You can't do that with floating tremolos, they need to be parallel to the body during the whole set-up or else it won't be in tune afterwards. The best way to do it is to block the trem in a way that it's parallel to the top of the body, tune the strings and then adjust the springs so the bridge stays about the same. Unblock it and tune the A string buy adjusting the claw springs until you get the A tuned perfectly. At that point the whole bridge should be in tune and will stay that way.
I play Lacrosse, you should too
Quote by reeses
heed this man's suggestion, for he is wise.

Aww shucks...

Quote by Tom 1.0
Oh and wait for the Schecter fan boys, if you listen real hard you can already hear them coming.
#19
Quote by ethan_hanus
Well, considering that light top heavy bottom strings have the low E, A, and D strings considerably thicker, and considering that the low strings make up the majority of the string tension, it's no surprise that this happened going from .009-.046 to .010-.052, the tension differences are massive, even if it would of been a normal light gauge string set.

All TS needs to do is toss 2 more springs in there and he'll be fine to start adjusting.


Well, about 14kg, not exactly 'massive' but enough to change things.

I've used 11/48's in E Standard on 3 springs without any problem whatsoever, so it strikes me that there's more to the TS's problem than meets the eye...
#21
Quote by Arby911
Well, about 14kg, not exactly 'massive' but enough to change things.

I've used 11/48's in E Standard on 3 springs without any problem whatsoever, so it strikes me that there's more to the TS's problem than meets the eye...


Depends on the springs, the stock springs that came in my Squier were massive compared to the original Fender springs I recently bought. 3 stock Squier springs had more tension than 5 stock original Fender springs, the coils were just thicker.

Kinda makes me wish I didn't loose that 3ed Squier spring.