#1
So, today my aunt gave me her old 12 string. It's an Italian made Eko, mid-late 60's, guessing the model is the Ranger. It's quite banged up, and I would like to fix it up. I'm going to take it to the local music shop to get some advice from them, but I figured I'd also like input from a wider audience, seeing as I've never done any work on a guitar like this before. Anyway, here are some pictures of the damage:

Scratches/cracks in the finish


End of the neck has a wicked crack




A very unsightly spot in the corner


And to top it off, the pick guard has been detached






I'm not really sure where to start. I know on the very rough spots, I will have to sand down the finish and refinish it, which I've never done. For that nasty hole in the corner, probably won't be able to do much with it, possible cut it out and just make it an extra sound hole or put a new piece in? Any advice will be very welcome, I want to make this thing sing again!
#3
That's beast. Haha. But you can tell she was a nice lookin' piece in her day. And I'm sure it could be fixed up. Good on you for not abandoning her.

I couldn't tell you how to fix the hole, to be honest. But I'm willing to bet that the neck crack near the headstock is a much bigger problem. Depending on how severe the damage is, it could be a real pain to fix or replace.

The pick guard is also probably the least of your worries. Especially if you're going to refinish. That can be replaced for pretty cheap.

Anyway, definitely get some professional advice and make it a project. By the time you're done, you'll really have something to be proud of. Look forward to the refinished pics.

Jam on.
"Because hoes don't trust anyone.. especially me."
#4
Thanks for the confidence! I will certainly post after pictures when I finish this beast. I've been reading up quite a bit on these sort of repairs, I think I should be up to the task, I'm pretty good at woodshop-type stuff. I'm still taking it to the shop to get some of their advice before I dive in though, probably smartest to get as much info as I can.
#5
Quote by wandering_taco
Thanks for the confidence! I will certainly post after pictures when I finish this beast. I've been reading up quite a bit on these sort of repairs, I think I should be up to the task, I'm pretty good at woodshop-type stuff. I'm still taking it to the shop to get some of their advice before I dive in though, probably smartest to get as much info as I can.


Well you got it for free and really it can only get better from here, whatever you do to it. Haha. Sounds like you're going about it the right way, anyway.
"Because hoes don't trust anyone.. especially me."
#7
taco;

Man! I hate ta sound like a boor; but yer likely gonna hate yerself if ya do anything to that old piece. Waaaaay too much major damage to economically repair. Once ya start in tearing down and removing finish, you'll likely see the error and wish ya could just go back and NOT do it.
Better ta leave it as-is and use it for a wall-hanger.

OK! That said....even IF ya manage all the repairs and get it back together; it'll be a toss up that it's even playable; let alone sound good

If all ya want is a [permanent] project and tufts of pulled out hair strewn about the floor....go for it!
Really...I *am* trying to encourage you. To use auto restoration as example....
Frame-off resto of a classic '65 Mustang Shelby GT350 that's been sitting in a barn since when..... is like finding a beat up '59 Fender at a yardsale for $25.00. Or in yer case; making a totally wrecked 1986 Yugo roadworthy?

That's the Yugo, my friend

Bless You if you decide to press on with the project. While getting it appraised by yer local Luthier will be enlightening; you may hear his laughter/crying all the way home.

Major reconstruction to the neck/headstock and the piecing in of a patch on the side are the worst. Finish and guard are the easiest, respectively; tho not necessarily easy in-and-of themselves.
If nothing else, you will find out how a guitar is built..from the inside out! That may be worth the effort in any event?

Best,
D-10
Last edited by deltaten at Jul 4, 2011,
#8
Lol you don't sound too confident. I have the neck glued already and today I drilled a hole and inserted a dowel above the crack to help strengthen the broken section. As for that hole in the side, that's still iffy no matter what. I was able to pry the pieces up so they are relatively flat, leaving only a couple little holes on either side, which I think I can fill with some wood filler. After that I'll probably just spray finish over that part, I don't care how cracked and ugly it looks there lol. The finish around the crack in the neck will be quite an adventure to redo however.