#1
One thing I keep noticing is that every time I try to execute a hammer on or pull off my pinky stretches waaaaay back away from the fret board. I've been playing for about 5 years now and it's something I want to fix but I don't know how :|
#2
I found myself opposite

My pinky doesnt curl up and when I see everybody elses, their pinky does curl. That had me worried too. It is really nothing to worry about.

Try using your pinky more often for pull offs and so forth. How? Just practice, and eventually it will feel natural. It will feel weird at first but it doesnt take overnight. It wont affect your playing/technique as far as I know but someone did tell me pinky curling is counter-productive...
#3
Quote by ltate15
I found myself opposite

My pinky doesnt curl up and when I see everybody elses, their pinky does curl. That had me worried too. It is really nothing to worry about.

Try using your pinky more often for pull offs and so forth. How? Just practice, and eventually it will feel natural. It will feel weird at first but it doesnt take overnight. It wont affect your playing/technique as far as I know but someone did tell me pinky curling is counter-productive...

Wut? TS didn't mention curling at all. Perhaps you should read the post before posting. And yes, curling your pinky is a bad habit. If your fingers only have to move 2 millimeters instead of 2 centimeters, you will be more accurate and faster.

TS, if you've been playing like that for 5 years, it's probably going to take a really long time to break the habit. But basically all it is is consciously trying to keep your pinky closer to the fretboard. Just go slow.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#4
Quote by ChakanaX
One thing I keep noticing is that every time I try to execute a hammer on or pull off my pinky stretches waaaaay back away from the fret board. I've been playing for about 5 years now and it's something I want to fix but I don't know how :|

You'll want to reduce involuntary finger movements by learning to keep your fingers relaxed - especially the fingers not being used at the moment.
This leads directly to better finger independence and also will stop your fingers from flying away.

There are tons of exercises for it. The common factor is go very slow and relax between each note - Do this type of stuff often like every day, but maybe only 15-20 minutes a day. It will pay off over time, guaranteed.

Search youtube for 'finger independence' video by freepower. Watch the whole thing because it addresses fingers lifting off the fretboard at one point.
#5
How far should your pinky or any finger move away from the fret board exactly? Sometimes I feel like when ever I do a hammer on, I need to move my fingers waaaaay back just to get a sound out of the string.
#6
Quote by ChakanaX
How far should your pinky or any finger move away from the fret board exactly? Sometimes I feel like when ever I do a hammer on, I need to move my fingers waaaaay back just to get a sound out of the string.

Generally, you want to have your fingers as close as possible. There's no exact number. Basically the closer you are, the better you can be.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#7
Quote by ChakanaX
How far should your pinky or any finger move away from the fret board exactly? Sometimes I feel like when ever I do a hammer on, I need to move my fingers waaaaay back just to get a sound out of the string.

You don't need to get a lot of distance for a good sounding note. Think of a real hammer. Swing it straight and hit the nail on the head, then it's easy to sink the nail... A bad swing/hit and you will either bend the nail, or miss it entirely.
Note that swinging the hammer from further away doesn't change anything.

That's similar to effective hammer-ons, in that your striking technique makes a huge difference to the results.
Ideally, you want the finger tip to come straight down on the string, and strike it near the center of your finger tip. (right on the bone underneath). If you can do that, you don't need much effort or distance for the note to ring loud and clear.

But if your fingertip is coming down at an angle, or you are hitting the string with a soft part of it... then you're wasting a lot of effort for bad results.

I would do some very slow hammer-ons and find that perfect striking point in your own fingers. Once you find it... practice it a lot (slowly at first) until you are 100% consistent with it.
Eventually you should lose the that feeling that you need a lot of distance... and still get great sounding notes with a lot less effort.