#1
Basically it's winter here in Australia and of course my hands are very cold. I feel most the time though that my playing is getting worse. I'm finding slides more difficult in particular, and my movement is less fluid.

I was wondering if a combination of cold hands and rusty strings could cause something like this?
My strings are D'Addario 0.09-0.46s and they're about 3 months old (yes i know that's pretty old haha).

Do you think these combination of things could be limiting my playing?
Also, do strings tend to rust faster in colder conditions.
Any feedback would be great.
Thank you (:
Last edited by vayne92 at Jul 1, 2011,
#2
Well, if your hands go a bit numb in winter, then that'll definitely make it harder to play guitar. I'm not 100% sure about the rust thing but my guess would be yes, as there's more moisture in the air. Replace them, when finished playing wipe it down and put it in either a case or a very dry area.
#3
Quote by vayne92
Basically it's winter here in Australia and of course my hands are very cold. I feel most the time though that my playing is getting worse. I'm finding slides more difficult in particular, and my movement is less fluid.

I was wondering if a combination of cold hands and rusty strings could cause something like this?
My strings are D'Addario 0.09-0.46s and they're about 3 months old (yes i know that's pretty old haha).

Do you think these combination of things could be limiting my playing?
Also, do strings tend to rust faster in colder conditions.
Any feedback would be great.
Thank you (:


I thought it's july...?
#6
Hey Vayne. My name is Ben and My band is based in Rochester, NY USA and it get F**KN COLD! We practiced for 8 months in the attic of my old house, and the better part of those 8 months were spent freezing our asses off in the blizzard winter. It's my recommendation since I have a bit of experience with BS cold practice spaces lololol, that you keep your guitar somewhere that is around 30 degrees C whenever you are not playing to avoid string rust when oily fingers start playing(oil is natural, not hating lol). Also the cold is precisely what is causing your hands to slow. Since your fingers are so far from your bodies core they are super easy to get cold, AND since it doesnt work to wear gloves you kinda just have to deal with it. It SUCKS, I know... But it will only make you work harder, like wearing finger weights. So keep your chin up guy cause winter only lasts so long and once its over all that painful hard work fighting throught the cold will make you a better faster stronger player!

Rock ON!
The Results!
#7
Sydney 11°C 18°C
Melbourne 8°C 16°C
Brisbane 10°C 20°C
Perth 9°C 16°C
Adelaide 13°C 16°C
Canberra -5°C 14°C
Hobart 6°C 14°C
Darwin 19°C 30°C


You call that winter?
#8
Quote by vayne92
Basically it's winter here in Australia and of course my hands are very cold. I feel most the time though that my playing is getting worse. I'm finding slides more difficult in particular, and my movement is less fluid.

I was wondering if a combination of cold hands and rusty strings could cause something like this?
My strings are D'Addario 0.09-0.46s and they're about 3 months old (yes i know that's pretty old haha).

Do you think these combination of things could be limiting my playing?
Also, do strings tend to rust faster in colder conditions.
Any feedback would be great.
Thank you (:


Lol don't listen to some of the though guys here, (Winter)cold makes the blood flow less efficient. What that means is your muscles and tendons don't get the chemicals fast enough to heal at the normal rate, so pain and numbness manifest.

Chanches for tendinitis rise enormously when playing an instrument in the cold.

Thats why when its really cold people feel a pain in their elbow tendons (when doing nothing)
Mountain climbers can get tendinitis just from the extreme cold ALONE (-20°, no repetitve movements involved.


So can't you up the f*cking temp in your room?
#9
Quote by Larz89
Lol don't listen to some of the though guys here, (Winter)cold makes the blood flow less efficient. What that means is your muscles and tendons don't get the chemicals fast enough to heal at the normal rate, so pain and numbness manifest.

Chanches for tendinitis rise enormously when playing an instrument in the cold.

Thats why when its really cold people feel a pain in their elbow tendons (when doing nothing)
Mountain climbers can get tendinitis just from the extreme cold ALONE (-20°, no repetitve movements involved.


So can't you up the f*cking temp in your room?



Jesus, do all leave in africa or something? Extreme cold= -20? ...
#10
9 degrees for me is ****ing cold haha, and there's no heating in my house :c

For us Australians we're not so accustomed to the cold... if you came here during summer in 40+ degree days you'd be complaining a lot more than we would (:
#11
Quote by Zeletros
Sydney 11°C 18°C
Melbourne 8°C 16°C
Brisbane 10°C 20°C
Perth 9°C 16°C
Adelaide 13°C 16°C
Canberra -5°C 14°C
Hobart 6°C 14°C
Darwin 19°C 30°C


You call that winter?

The tilt of the Earth's axis and our respective geographic location tells me ''yes''
#12
Quote by Zeletros
Jesus, do all leave in africa or something? Extreme cold= -20? ...


Celcius my good man, -20°C is a temp that your **** freezes off when you want to piss outside.

It can always be worse (-40°C, ...) in some places but -20°C is not a temp most people would call comfortable.
Last edited by Larz89 at Jul 1, 2011,