#1
Hey guys!

Just a quick question for ya´ll, it will prob be something really obvious that i havent thought about though. :P

I was wondering how players learn to play that really melodic stuff, you know. The kind of stuff that feels like it always fits in that place of the song.

Example.

Alex Hutchings : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M6SJjH-Bdvs

Other examples may be : Joe satriani (always with me, always with you), marco sfogli (Still hurts), Eric Johnson (anything really) and John petrucci (wishful thinking).

These guys playing is just so melodic and always fits the songs, what do i have to practice to get that? Technique to play the stuff is obvious but what other stuff? Arpeggio notes?

Cheers! And thanks in advance!

Sickz.
#2
Match the scales and licks your leads are using with the chord progressions.
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#3
Good general knowledge of scales, modes and chord progressions. A good bit of knowledge on jazz improvisation never goes amiss either, I'm a tenor sax player as well as a guitarist and I find that I can create fluid melodic guitar lines off the cuff based on knowledge gleaned from playing sax for some 10+ years.
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#4
In addition to what everyone else has already said, focus on chord tones if you need a starting point. Also, I find the same approach to writing solos helps, just try to hum or sing something in your head and replicate it.
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#5
you need to be able to hear that sort of thing. you won't get it just by knowing a few scale shapes.

train your ear, and listen to jazz (there are other genres to listen to, of course, but jazz encompasses the most venerated improvisers). as far as jazz goes, listen to the greats -- coltrane, davis, etc. and really listen to their lines. internalize them. paul desmond is another great example -- he's considered by many to be the greatest improviser in modern music, because he has such a knack for playing the right notes at the right time.

long story short: if you want to get better at improvising, listen to great improvisers and analyze what they do. break it down so that you can employ similar devices. that's the real brilliance of music, and it's one that so many musicians neglect for whatever reason.
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#6
Quote by Sickz
Hey guys!

Just a quick question for ya´ll, it will prob be something really obvious that i havent thought about though. :P

I was wondering how players learn to play that really melodic stuff, you know. The kind of stuff that feels like it always fits in that place of the song.

Example.

Alex Hutchings : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M6SJjH-Bdvs

Other examples may be : Joe satriani (always with me, always with you), marco sfogli (Still hurts), Eric Johnson (anything really) and John petrucci (wishful thinking).

These guys playing is just so melodic and always fits the songs, what do i have to practice to get that? Technique to play the stuff is obvious but what other stuff? Arpeggio notes?

Cheers! And thanks in advance!

Sickz.

Understand the idea of tension and release, resolution, and all that business. Get a good feel for the chord progression(s) you'll be playing over.

The most important aspect of playing a melodic part is to learn how to listen. Know what the other parts are doing and what kind of direction they're going in. Really try to get a feel for what direction the song takes during certain passages and try to emphasize that rather than just play whatever you want over it. Learn to use the chord tones to your advantage to build your melody in a certain direction.

Another thing to do, especially if the rhythm part is just straight vamped chords, is to learn to use that rhythm to your advantage. If the rhythm is straight eight notes, for example, learn to use other rhythmic figures to add interest to your playing.

The most important aspect of a melody is direction. A lot of people get turned off of jam bands and improvisational players because they seem to lack direction in their leads. Know where you're starting in the chord progression, know where you're stopping, and know what's happening between those two points. When you've developed your ear and your sense of melodic feel (I know, those are very ambiguous terms, but that's really the best I can do), you'll become more skilled at putting a melody on top of a progression that has direction and sounds "right" in context.