#1
Hi,
I have been playing guitar for several years now, but after (really) hundreds of internet lessons I still have a problem with improvising solo's...
The problem is: when I have a certain chord progression as the rhythm part and I want to play a solo over that progression, I never seem to get in which key I should play the solo.
Of course, if all the chords are in the same key ( let's say Am,F, C, G) I know I have to play the solo in that key (C). But in many songs all the chords are in different keys. Do I have to alternate my solo's in different keys, do i have to use modes or arppegio's, should I play the according scale over each specific chord I am playing...?
I askes it to many people, but no one has been able to give me useful advice...
It's really frustrating to see that I cannot figure this out, I hope you can help me...
#2
yes all of those will help your solos sound more fitting
but try to look at the notes in the chords and what function the chords have

jus curious what kind of music do oyu listen to/play that has all of the chords in different keys?
#3
One thing you can do is follow the key changes.

What also works pretty well it to use chord notes at first and then experiment with adding in some other notes.

Also, try to find the notes that occur in all the keys or in keys that are adjacent in the song. They can work well when moving from one key to the other. Notes that occur in all of the keys are safe to play at any point in the song.
#4
Are you sure it's in different keys? the melodic and harmonic minor can sometimes make it seem like a song is changing keys because of the way the 6th and 7th move, without actually changing the key
#5
Focus on each individual chord rather than trying to fit a scale to the whole thing. A couple of people have mentioned using chord tones (the notes that make up the chord: ) this is a great start and will help you sound good even over borrowed/chromatic harmony.

Try playing slowly, perhaps one - three notes per measure with a backing harmony. Start on a chord tone of the first chord and try to move smoothly to a chord tone of the next chord when the harmony changes. This will keep your solo connected and sound "right."

There's no single way to use to pick your tensions (non-chord tones.) You can change scales every chord change, e.g. using the appropriate major/minor scale over each triad. Or you can try to relate back to the tonal center by using tensions from that scale. If the chords are C - G, using F (from the C major scale) as a tension over the G chord will have a much different effect than using the F# from the G major scale. So, experiment, listen and choose carefully.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#6
Quote by Thommyzors
Hi,
I have been playing guitar for several years now, but after (really) hundreds of internet lessons I still have a problem with improvising solo's...
The problem is: when I have a certain chord progression as the rhythm part and I want to play a solo over that progression, I never seem to get in which key I should play the solo.
Of course, if all the chords are in the same key ( let's say Am,F, C, G) I know I have to play the solo in that key (C). But in many songs all the chords are in different keys. Do I have to alternate my solo's in different keys, do i have to use modes or arppegio's, should I play the according scale over each specific chord I am playing...?
I askes it to many people, but no one has been able to give me useful advice...
It's really frustrating to see that I cannot figure this out, I hope you can help me...


It's actually a lot easier than that, I see where you're getting frustrated, but hopefully I can clear it up somewhat.

Where does the song resolve? Sure, keys share chords, but their position within the key may have a totally different Function, from another key that has that chord. So find the note that feels like "home" to the progression, and you have your key.

You might also want to study cadences (how chords move) Modulation (key changes) and borrowed chords/modal interchange. Additionally if you know your triad tones, lets say you get an odd chord....you can invoke one of the chord tones when that wierd chord comes up, rather than changing key, and then come back into the key when the chords return to common place ones.

Generally, you'll want to learn to understand the V - I cadence to spot key changes. If you are in Jazz, this happens a lot; if rock or pop, rarely do we see even ONE key change.

Best,

Sean
#8
Thanks all,
I'm into rock ballads actually,
but I want a very wide playing area, and I think the root of most of the music I listen to is jazz and blues. Although I did quite a lot music theory lessons, I still had problems figuring this out.
Your comments helped quite a lot, if you have other tips; please keep them coming!
Thanks for the help,
all the best,
Thommyzors