#1
Hey guys, I was wondering could I put an active pickup in a guitar that already has passive pickups in. I was wondering because you'd have to put in a battery compartment yourself and wiring might be difficult. Is it possible?

I myself wouldn't do the procedure i'd go to my local guitar store and get them to do it for me (they're professionals and highly experienced) I was just wondering if this could be done.

Thanks!
#2
Quote by Skiny boy89
Hey guys, I was wondering could I put an active pickup in a guitar that already has passive pickups in. I was wondering because you'd have to put in a battery compartment yourself and wiring might be difficult. Is it possible?

I myself wouldn't do the procedure i'd go to my local guitar store and get them to do it for me (they're professionals and highly experienced) I was just wondering if this could be done.

Thanks!



Here's what EMG says about mixing pups:

"Can I mix EMG's with passive pickups?
It is possible to mix EMG's with passive pickups. There are three possible wiring configurations; one is better than the other two.

Use the high impedance (250K-500K) volume and tone controls. The problem is that the high impedance controls act more like a switch to the EMG's. The passive pickups, however, will work fine. If you have a guitar with two pickups and two volume pots, with a three-way switch, there is another alternative. Use the 25K pots for the EMG, and the 250K pots for the passive pickup. This way you can use one or the other with no adverse affects, but with the switch in the middle position the passive pickup will have reduced gain and response.

Use the low-impedance (25K) volume and tone controls provided with the EMG's. The problem here is that the passive pickups will suffer a reduction in gain and loss of high-frequency response.

This is the best alternative. Install an EMG-PA-2 on the passive pickups. There are two benefits to doing this. With the trimpot on the PA-2, you can adjust the gain of the passive pickups to match the EMG's. The PA-2 acts as an impedance matching device so you can use the low-impedance EMG controls (25K) without affecting the tone of the passive pickups. You will also be able to use other EMG accessory circuits such as the SPC, RPC, EXB, EXG, etc. For this application, we recommend ordering the PA-2 without the switch for easy installation on the inside of a guitar."


It is no problem if you keep the pots separate.

That means in a 4-pot guitar you can have one vol and one tone each, but you get into trouble when you have both pickups on. I'll work fine as long as you run one at a time.

A solution for the both pickups in parallel is to put a preamp into the guitar and route the passive humbucker through the preamp when the switch is in the middle.

what sound are you looking for and amp are you using?
Last edited by shredspillers at Jul 2, 2011,
#3
it can be done, but you need to completely rewire the guitar and use a stereo input jack.
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#4
It's not worth the hassle. It's seriously a pain, and the rewards aren't that great. Usually the balance between an active and a passive is totally ****ed.

If you're looking for active tone, look into the DiMarzio D-Activator. It's a passive pickup that emulates active tone, and does it pretty well.
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