#1
Okay so I have this blues song right. And its in the key of Bb. Well, my guitar teacher told me to change the song to the keys of G, C, and F BUT only problem is he didnt explain it to me very well cause i dont think he likes me to much Haha -,- soooo if anyone could help me that would be AMAZING
#2
If it's blues it's most likely a I-IV-V progression so Bb, Eb and F right?

Just take chords I-IV-and V in the keys of G, C and F and there you go.

Provided your teacher explained scale degrees, harmonising the major scale and a quick look at key signatures, and of course, that you were paying attention at all. Then it should be pretty easy to work out!
#3
Understand what the relationship of each chord is to one another (which is all tonal theory is anyways). For example, if the song is in Bb, that probably means your using Bb, Eb, and F chords in the progression, am I right?

If so, then you can see that Eb is a fourth above Bb and F is a fifth above Bb.

Now use the same to find the chords in the other keys. What chords are a fourth and a fifth above C, for example.

Alternatively, a capo can help you cheat.
#4
Oooooohhh so basically you just find the relationship (or whatever) between the key and the chords in the song? okay that makes sense thanks homes! Haha

Haha and i wish i could just use a capo -,- to bad guitar teach is all about making my life difficult LOL
#5
Actually, learning to change key without a capo is a huge benefit. Learn your chords all over the neck, not only will your knowledge of the fretboard improve but you'll be able to spice up chord progressions. Cut your teacher some slack man!

And yeah, Just figure out where the chords fit into the key signature you're given, and just apply that sequence to the new key! Easy!
#6
Quote by Metalkid94
Okay so I have this blues song right. And its in the key of Bb. Well, my guitar teacher told me to change the song to the keys of G, C, and F BUT only problem is he didnt explain it to me very well cause i dont think he likes me to much Haha -,- soooo if anyone could help me that would be AMAZING



Then it may be that he's neither a teacher, nor suitable for helping you to develop. If you don't feel like you can question things and ask for help, you are probably not deriving much benefit from the "teacher".

Just because they call themselves a teacher doesn't mean they can teach.

But, the answer to your problem, is linked crucially to what you know to this point. Do you know/have you been taught the Harmonized Major scale? Can you spell out (with letters, not tabs) all Major Scales?

If not, then you haven't been given much of a foundation (ala he hasn't "taught" you very well)

If so, then you want to look at ways to call the V of the attending keys. If you don't understand this, then that is a concern as well. I teach guitar and theory for a living, and it's important to foundationally prepare the student before throwing them into random concepts.

Additionally, these are all Closely held Modulations, and the transitions are relatively simple. However studying Modulation techniques are not hard at all when you have a foundation, and it's possible to better "blend" into the V of the key using the ii of the target key beforehand.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jul 3, 2011,
#7
Quote by shmeegle
Actually, learning to change key without a capo is a huge benefit.

To clarify (especially for OP) the capo thing was a joke.
#8
Quote by Sean0913
Then it may be that he's neither a teacher, nor suitable for helping you to develop. If you don't feel like you can question things and ask for help, you are probably not deriving much benefit from the "teacher".

Just because they call themselves a teacher doesn't mean they can teach.

But, the answer to your problem, is linked crucially to what you know to this point. Do you know/have you been taught the Harmonized Major scale? Can you spell out (with letters, not tabs) all Major Scales?

If not, then you haven't been given much of a foundation (ala he hasn't "taught" you very well)

If so, then you want to look at ways to call the V of the attending keys. If you don't understand this, then that is a concern as well. I teach guitar and theory for a living, and it's important to foundationally prepare the student before throwing them into random concepts.

Additionally, these are all Closely held Modulations, and the transitions are relatively simple. However studying Modulation techniques are not hard at all when you have a foundation, and it's possible to better "blend" into the V of the key using the ii of the target key beforehand.

Best,

Sean



To be honest i really dont know. I've been taught a few major scales. But as far as the "harmonized major scale" I'm not quite sure what that would be. He's taught me how to do things but not what it is and why im learning it. So I might know that or i might not. Also, could you link me to a site that explains 'the V of key"?
Thanks so much


...someone give me a capo! LOL kidding xD
#9
Quote by Metalkid94
To be honest i really dont know. I've been taught a few major scales. But as far as the "harmonized major scale" I'm not quite sure what that would be. He's taught me how to do things but not what it is and why im learning it. So I might know that or i might not. Also, could you link me to a site that explains 'the V of key"?
Thanks so much


...someone give me a capo! LOL kidding xD


Doesn't sound like a good teacher to me, if you are seeking to understand anything. He might be good at getting you to parrot and be an imitator without knowing anything. If that works ok for you, then I guess you'll be all right.

Can you spell the letters of every major scale? If not then a link won't do you good explaining the V. The major scale is important to understand anything else with theory. I don't mean playing "patterns", I mean spelling out the notes, in every Major scale, starting on A and ending on G.

Best,

Sean