#1
Hey there UG, not to active in the techniques section but here goes nothing:

Im trying to develop "my" style of soloing and the sound in my head to be expressed through the guitar. I want to have that crossover from Metal/Shred and Blues. kind of like how dime did his stuff. i come here asking some significant scales (besides stuff like the pentatonic or blues cause that's obvious) or modes. or even better, maybe a couple licks i can work around that can get me that sound.

Any Suggestions?
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#2
**** modes. That's some super-complicated that stuff that's way above the skill level of a large number of people here and a lot of them have misconceptions about modality.

I would look at artists who you would like to emulate (because nothing is truly original) and listen to what techniques they're using. Make sure you know your scales--natural major and natural/harmonic/melodic minor--and you can always use exotic scales (not my forte, so I'll leave recommendations to someone else). Minor pentatonic is your big friend here; almost every metal/rock band uses it heavily.
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Its the Lydian mode; formed in Eastern Arabia when the Persians invaded England.


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try the sexolydian scale.
#3
^ thats a start, ty for the input!
Quote by kangaxxter
The only real answer to the SG vs Les Paul debate is to get a Flying V and laugh at all the suckers who don't have one.


Quote by Blompcube

if you embrace inaccurate intonation it can be quite arousing.


I <3 TWEED
#4
Quote by jwd724
**** modes. That's some super-complicated that stuff that's way above the skill level of a large number of people here and a lot of them have misconceptions about modality.


1) It's really not that complicated. 2) **** it because a lot of people don't get it? That's stupid.


Though really, if you're just trying to sound like bluesy metal, then you won't need more then regular minor and pentatonic. You should always want to learn more about music of course, but other scales aren't going to help you sound any more bluesy.
#5
What I have notice is that Is that, whenver I'm picking down and up on a single string the pick makes this horrible clanky sound, almost as If I'm digging into the string as I'm playing, but I can assure you that I'm using the tip of the pick?
Last edited by Bermuda_ at Jul 2, 2011,
#6
Quote by Bermuda_
What I have notice is that Is that, whenver I'm picking down and up on a single string the pick makes this horrible clanky sound, almost as If I'm digging into the string as I'm playing, but I can assure you that I'm using the tip of the pick?


Wut? How is this relevant?
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#7
Quote by Bermuda_
What I have notice is that Is that, whenver I'm picking down and up on a single string the pick makes this horrible clanky sound, almost as If I'm digging into the string as I'm playing, but I can assure you that I'm using the tip of the pick?


How insightful. Thanks.
#8
ruined into troll thread, any specific examples guys? like a lick i can work around?
Quote by kangaxxter
The only real answer to the SG vs Les Paul debate is to get a Flying V and laugh at all the suckers who don't have one.


Quote by Blompcube

if you embrace inaccurate intonation it can be quite arousing.


I <3 TWEED
#9
Scales don't define a person's sound/style, it's what they do with the notes available to them that does. I suggest you listen to as much music from the various genres that you listed as you can, and really listen to it. Listen to the phrasing, what notes they use, how they use their notes, what they are trying to express, and then learn a few songs.

You'll notice over time that there are certain conventions present throughout all of the different genres of music that really define that genre, and soon you'll be able to write original (or close to, since nothing really is original anymore) stuff in that genre, and then you can really mix it up between the different genres, and add your own style.

For example, in blues, you have heavy use of bending and vibrato, licks that really flow together, are smooth sounding, and ultimately "tell a story". It's true though, that blues does make use of the pentatonic scale, but you really have to know how to use the notes in the scale to sound "bluesy".

Hope I helped.