#2
The notes in each chord are D F# A for D major, E G# B for E major, and F# A C# for F#m, which fit into the format of a IV V vi progression in the key of A major (A B C# D E F# G#), or the relative F# minor, depending on where the progression resolves to or feel ''at home''.
If the progression naturally resolves to your D major chord, however, you may be in the key of D major (D E F# G A B C#) and employing an accidental - borrowed tone - in your E major chord.

Are there any more chords in the piece that you could provide? The entire context is very important when determining a song's key, or keys.
Last edited by juckfush at Jul 3, 2011,
#3
if im not mistaken those chords would be a part of A Major right? i would have wanted to say D Major but it doesnt have an E minor chord, unless you forgot to mention that and wanted us to assume all chords were minor?


Edit: Actually nvm ^what he said lol he explained what i wanted to in a much better way :P
My Gear:

2010 Fender American Deluxe Sunburst Stratocaster HSS (1st Choice)
Ibanez RG 5EX1 (2nd Choice)
Fender Hot Rod Deluxe III
Dunlop Crybaby Wah Pedal
Digitech Time Bender Delay
Boss BF-2 Flanger)
EHX Germanium 4 Big Muff Pi
#5
Yeah it resolves on D. Whats the significance in using an accidental in a song like that. Does it change the way i have to write it? Will it alter the scales i can play over the chords? Inform me please lol
#6
And no JuckFush, its in the process of being written, and im trying to figure out which other chords i can use to make this song.
#7
You know what... nevermind.. It seems that it resolves on F#m haha woops. Thank you guys
#8
Quote by JacobCaine
And no JuckFush, its in the process of being written, and im trying to figure out which other chords i can use to make this song.

Not a problem! A good place to start in terms of knowing which chords will work together in a key is to understand how the major scale is constructed, and how triads (major and minor chords) are constructed from the notes in a major scale.

I'd recommend starting out with this lesson on musictheory.net, a site recommended by many users on these forums. This article features an interactive explanation of major scale construction, and these following lesson details construction of minor scales - you'll find that there exists a relationship between particular major and minor keys which is called ''relative keys''; the relative minor scale of a major key is built off of the sixth degree in any major key (for example, the key of D major consists of D E F# G A B C#, and B minor, the sixth degree and thus the relative minor, consists of B C# D E F# G A. The website I linked will definitely help out much more concisely and directly).
After this, I'd recommend learning how the Circle of Fifths functions, which I can help out with if you'd like to PM me. This concept further explains relationships between all keys, and it's where everything starts to come together.
After this, I'd say try to write the triads for each major and minor key, moving clockwise around the circle of fifths. The website I linked also explains this - there will be a link on the main Lessons page, and it's worth exploring each Lesson in order if you'd like to understand the basic, and most important theory - but again, I'd be happy to help if I can!
From here, you'll have a solid understanding of keys and how chords - and even chords shared between keys - relate, and you can move on to learn about chord voicings and inversions, which can open many a door for writing and compositional, as well as performance strategies.

Sorry for springing theory so abruptly on you, but learning the fundamentals will definitely help you much more than having to ask a forum.
If you'd like to wait a while before jumping into the studies, a list of the triads and their notes in F# minor is below:

F#m - F# A C#
G#mb5 - G# B D
A - A C# E
Bm - B D F#
C#m - C# E G#
D - D F# A
E - E G# B


EDIT: The chords above have been fixed; sorry about that, and thanks for picking up on my embarrassing blunder, Alan!
Last edited by juckfush at Jul 3, 2011,
#9
Quote by juckfush

If you'd like to wait a while before jumping into the studies, a list of the triads and their notes in F# minor is below:


G - G B D
C#b5 - C# E G
Em - E G B


You sure about those ones mate?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#10
Quote by AlanHB
You sure about those ones mate?

Oh, no...

Methinks I had the key signature for D major in mind for whatever horrible reason, haha. I'll edit the corrections into my original post - thanks for picking up on that!
Last edited by juckfush at Jul 3, 2011,
#11
Quote by JacobCaine
Yeah it resolves on D. Whats the significance in using an accidental in a song like that. Does it change the way i have to write it? Will it alter the scales i can play over the chords? Inform me please lol



If it resolves and feels resolved on D, it's in D. It definitely could change the way you'd approach scale-wise, but if you know the notes in any triads that are outside the diatonic key, well then, you can play a note from that triad when over that chord, and come back to the regular scale, for the other chords.

Personally I don't hear these chord functions resolving on D, if I play this. I'd hear this as a IV V vi in A, ( a deceptive cadence) that doesn't feel yet resolved.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jul 3, 2011,