#1
I'm a little confused about them. Firstly, the definitions voicing and inversions, are they the same?
Secondly, using C major as an example, I know that CEG is root inversion, EGC being first and GCE being 2nd. What about the triads CGE? Or ECG?
#2
Quote by supercoolperson
I'm a little confused about them. Firstly, the definitions voicing and inversions, are they the same?
Secondly, using C major as an example, I know that CEG is root inversion, EGC being first and GCE being 2nd. What about the triads CGE? Or ECG?


CGE is just a simple root position traid. ECG is a C major traid in 1st inversion. It's what is the root note that makes the inversion, not the order in which the notes appear in the traid. If that makes sense... e.g. DFA is a Dm triad, DAF is still a Dm traid, FDA is a Dm in 1st inversion and so is FAD.

Hope that helps/makes sense.

Aidan.
#3
Oh, that makes sense. So it only depends on what degree the root falls in that determines its inversion. The tonic, third, and fifth degrees fall into the root, first and third inversions respectively, not taking into account the position of the other chord notes positions.
I think I understand it now.
#5
Quote by supercoolperson
I'm a little confused about them. Firstly, the definitions voicing and inversions, are they the same?
Secondly, using C major as an example, I know that CEG is root inversion, EGC being first and GCE being 2nd. What about the triads CGE? Or ECG?


Those are what I call compound inversions, in that the notes in them extend past an octave from the root. There isn't really a purpose for me calling them other than to acknowledge the condition of being beyond an octave, much like compound intervals are.

I tend to see the terms voicing and inversion in a similar light, however I don't personally think of them in the exact same way.

Best,

Sean
#6
Arent voicings geared towards more of the 'shape' of the chord than anything? Like a C major chord in the traditional CAGED position, compared to the C major in the 6th string barre form.
Also, are they called compound chords if they extend past more than one octave? Like CGE for example. Or is it technically called a compound inversion?
#8
Quote by supercoolperson
Arent voicings geared towards more of the 'shape' of the chord than anything? Like a C major chord in the traditional CAGED position, compared to the C major in the 6th string barre form.
Also, are they called compound chords if they extend past more than one octave? Like CGE for example. Or is it technically called a compound inversion?



I don't call anything a compound chord. And no, voicings aren't geared towards shapes, shapes are derived from voicings. There are compound intervals. You missed my point, I'm saying that it's how I "describe them" when I teach in a specific context, more for observation and comparison purposes than a particular term.

Best,

Sean