#1
Guys, I am not getting pinch harmonics at all. I did see some Youtube videos and read articles on them but I still can't seem to be able to get them, at all.

Any other advice which might help me? I have been playing for 2 years and I can alternate pick, fret, downpick, sweep, etc fairly well. Tapping, pinch harmonics, etc are some techniques which I have yet to learn.

Would practicing with a smaller pick help me with pinch harmonics? I use Dunlop 1.5 mm pick right now. Then maybe I could switch to these ones again later?

Thanks.
#3
Quote by hawk_kst
Thicker strings, thicker guitar pick and more distortion will always make it easier. Apart from that it's just practise (=

That's why I can't do it then, because I have really light strings!!! Thanks for telling me too
#4
try flicking to the bridge pickup for pinch harmonics. Also increase high end in your eq, and try a high gain setting.
#5
Try gripping the pick closer to the tip cuz you have to hit the string with your pick and thumb at pretty much them same time. It's all in the attack, but that being said you don't have to attack really hard. Sometimes I hit them easier when I'm really trying to.

If you can get sweeping you'll get this, it's easier.
#6
I would disagree with the first three posts because hitting pinched harmonics is a technique that has nothing to do with the thickness of your pick or strings. I can get pinched harmonics on my electric guitar unplugged with super-light strings (the pick I use is really thick but that's just preference).

TS, harmonics occur only on certain parts of the string which causes the entire string to vibrate (my theory on this is a little rust and also im not thinking straight hahaha but that's he basic idea I think). So if you hit a natural harmonic on the 12th fret, that's no problem - but if you were to press in the 1st fret the harmonic will have moved to the 13th fret and so on and so forth. So now the challenge is to figure out where the harmonics will have moved to above your pickups (because the same harmonic occurs at specific intervals on the string). Things like more distortion, thicker strings and thicker picks will help to get more "oomph!" for your pinched harmonics, but are not the reason why you can get them just yet. It's just practice dude. Go forth and experiment!
#7
Quote by UnmagicMushroom
I would disagree with the first three posts because hitting pinched harmonics is a technique that has nothing to do with the thickness of your pick or strings. I can get pinched harmonics on my electric guitar unplugged with super-light strings (the pick I use is really thick but that's just preference).

TS, harmonics occur only on certain parts of the string which causes the entire string to vibrate (my theory on this is a little rust and also im not thinking straight hahaha but that's he basic idea I think). So if you hit a natural harmonic on the 12th fret, that's no problem - but if you were to press in the 1st fret the harmonic will have moved to the 13th fret and so on and so forth. So now the challenge is to figure out where the harmonics will have moved to above your pickups (because the same harmonic occurs at specific intervals on the string). Things like more distortion, thicker strings and thicker picks will help to get more "oomph!" for your pinched harmonics, but are not the reason why you can get them just yet. It's just practice dude. Go forth and experiment!

This is wrong.
It makes no difference where you pinch harmonic...
You're confusing natural harmonics with pinch harmonics...
#8
Just make sure to brush your thumb lightly against the string. It's pretty hard to explain, but I doubt strings or picks make much of a difference, and while gain helps you can do it on an acoustic so it isn't vital.

I struggle to believe that you can do sweeping but not pinched harmonics, it's so much easier :/
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#9
This is wrong.
It makes no difference where you pinch harmonic...
You're confusing natural harmonics with pinch harmonics...


I don't think he's wrong because you can only hit a harmonic on one of those node spots. It's dependent upon the length of the string, and the essential length of the string is wherever you are fretting it with your left hand (i.e. if you fret at the 24th fret, your string length is smaller than if you were to fret at the 1st fret).


But anyway, I feel like I have finally been able to do pinch harmonics on command with no problems. All the tutorials on the internet and on here suck, "just hit the string with your thumb", well duh... There's a million spots on your thumb you can hit the string, but here is where I hit it with my thumb:




Go ahead and tell me I'm wrong but try it and you'll see it works. I find it works best when using the d or g strings (not too skinny not too fat).
#10
Quote by hawk_kst
This is wrong.
It makes no difference where you pinch harmonic...
You're confusing natural harmonics with pinch harmonics...


I think this is a misconception that people have that,"You just hit the string with your pick and your thumb like this and SCREAM NOTE!"
I think it would be fair to say that pinch harmonics have "harmonics" in the name, therefore it would have something to do with that (I'm not trying to be a smart ass here, but it just makes sense ). Actually, there are only 2 types of harmonics: natural harmonics and artificial harmonics. Pinched harmonics fall under the category of artificial harmonics. Now try to do an artificial harmonic anywhere on the string on an acoustic guitar and see what happens...you won't get harmonics just anywhere and the same goes on an electric guitar with tons of gain on it. You may get something that sounds like a pinched harmonic, but it won't be as sonorous as when you get it in the spot where an actual harmonic lies.
#11
I always tend to use my first finger when I pinch harmonic. Gives you much more control in my opinion. Try that, see how it works for you.
#12
Quote by hawk_kst
This is wrong.
It makes no difference where you pinch harmonic...
You're confusing natural harmonics with pinch harmonics...

CHOOO!! CHOOOOOOO!!! Here comes the clue train, last stop is you.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yZA4CkEbjY#t=5m36s

that link is for you as well TS. Paul gilbert teaches you pinch harmonics sort of lol.
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#13
Could have to do with your amp and method of distortion. Just purely from my experience, I can't get pinch harmonics to work well with my Metal Zone 2, but they ring out clearly with my cranked tube amps.
#14
1) listen to Zakk Wylde
2) your pick and thumb touch the string at the same time, then you slightly corkscrew it toward the pinky side of your hand as you play the note.
3) try moving you hand laterally a few centimeters further or closer away from the bridge until you find a spot that lights up.
4) make sure the pickup is in the bridge position for best results.
#15
Don't worry much about distortion or gain. You don't want to get dependent on any special equipment. I think the best way to figure it out is just experimentation. It's more of a feel thing than a set-in-stone technique. Just hold the pick in a manner where the pick isn't sticking out very far from your fingers, and experiment for a while. With patience, you'll get it. I learned it based off feel, and now I'm consistently hitting pinch harmonics. In fact, as I'm typing this, I'm hitting pinch harmonics on a $100 strat that isn't even plugged into anything.

Just my two cents. You may find a trick online that works perfect for you, but for me, experimentation and feel was the way to go.