#1
Ok guys, I've been doing some research into investing into some recording gear...
What I intend to do with said gear is to be able to record a 4 piece band (bass, vocals, guitar, drums) and produce a near/pro quality album...

Now my question for you all is is this possible with the gear I have listed? Any advice on the products themselves, whether I should replace it with something else or what not is greatly appreciated

iMac 2.5 GHz i5 8GB RAM
Focusrite Saffire Pro 40
Pro Tools 9
KRK Rokit Powered 8 G2
Various mics

This would run me around 3500 $ CAD (including taxes) to give you an idea of my budget

Thanks
#3
Well to get it to sound good it all depends on your room and what specific mics you are using for what instruments. Are you recording in a studio or your house or what? And what mics will you be using?
#4
Absolutely. However, if you have no experience recording don't except to get pro quality on your first effort, regardless of gear.
#5
Let me tell you about my studio.

I have a cheap ass programm and some VSTs= virtual instruments, I use them to make bass and drums, and nearly any other instrument, except guitar and vocals, to make guitar, I got a good microphone that I put near my amp... and that's it...


No more than... 200$ perhaps
#6
Quote by Zeletros
Let me tell you about my studio.

I have a cheap ass programm and some VSTs= virtual instruments, I use them to make bass and drums, and nearly any other instrument, except guitar and vocals, to make guitar, I got a good microphone that I put near my amp... and that's it...


No more than... 200$ perhaps


Its very easy to get a good sound with VSTs these days on guitar.

TS: what mics are you looking at getting?

Also your mixing is gonna be very important read up and practice!
Last edited by FireHawk at Jul 3, 2011,
#7
Depending on what you are picking up under 'various mics' id say you're looking pretty good. Mics are more important than most people make them out to be...

Alot of your final product will sound the way it does because of your mixing and production ability anyway so you still have to have an ear for what sounds good in the end. Something that cannot be stressed enough.

With that being said, I'd absolutely love to have this rig.

Just make sure you've got a good selection of mics.. some SM-57s and 421's, maybe a D-112, NT5's, and perhaps a 990 or 9000 condenser which will sound good without burning a hole in your pocket.


Best of luck to you sir, do enjoy yourself!
#8
Quote by FireHawk
Its very easy to get a good sound with VSTs these days on guitar.



Rhythm, acoustic and classical perhaps, but not solo guitar.


The songs I write have somewhat technical parts which are very dependant on tone and technique
#9
Quote by Zeletros
Rhythm, acoustic and classical perhaps, but not solo guitar.


The songs I write have somewhat technical parts which are very dependant on tone and technique



You're kidding me, right? Clearly, you're doing it wrong. Amp sims have some fantastic lead tones.
#10
Quote by Zeletros
Rhythm, acoustic and classical perhaps, but not solo guitar.


The songs I write have somewhat technical parts which are very dependant on tone and technique


Lead guitar can be made just easy as the rest on amp sims if you know what your doing. Anyway I am not getting in this debate. If you prefer mic over amp sim that's fine a lot people do

Acoustic could be the hardest...atleast to keep an acoustic tone...
#11
wow. thanks for the replies... I know this sounds dumb, but I'm not actually in a band (yet). I need to start looking for musicians who have the same musical interests as me.
I can record the guitar/bass/vocals in my basement but I have no access to drums for obvious reasons (see above)

As for mics, to start I was going to get an sm57 for electric guitar. For acoustic I was thinking a shure sm81, but if anyone has any cheaper ideas, please let me know!

Also, I am not terribly interested in VSTs (exception: maaaybe drums), I want to record actual instruments
#12
Quote by E7#9
wow. thanks for the replies... I know this sounds dumb, but I'm not actually in a band (yet). I need to start looking for musicians who have the same musical interests as me.
I can record the guitar/bass/vocals in my basement but I have no access to drums for obvious reasons (see above)

As for mics, to start I was going to get an sm57 for electric guitar. For acoustic I was thinking a shure sm81, but if anyone has any cheaper ideas, please let me know!

Also, I am not terribly interested in VSTs (exception: maaaybe drums), I want to record actual instruments



Clearly you didn't do much recording of original songs...


I myself want to AVOID recording actual instruments
#13
VST drums sound worse and are more fake than guitar :P Either can sound good with EQing though.

What about for vocals? I would recommend a Blue Bluebird mic for acoustic and vocals, instead of a Shure.
#14
Learning to sample drums can still be useful when recording live drums, as you can replace certain parts with a better sound. For example, if the drummer has a shitty snare, you can replace the snare sounds with a good sample. It still sounds natural and will surely sound better. And yes, a 57 is fine for an amp, and it will also be very useful for micing the drums, as they work very well for snares and toms as well.

For acoustic, I use a 57 pointed at my strings higher on the neck and then use a condensor nearer to the sound hole. The 57 gives it a lot of airy-ness while the condensor gives a lot of the beefier low-end and such. Be sure not to try to capture too much low end when micing an acoustic, as that's a lot of new people's mistake. I use an AT3035 that I'm quite happy with that I got for $80 used, but there are tons of mics to look at out there.
#15
Quote by Zeletros
Clearly you didn't do much recording of original songs...


I myself want to AVOID recording actual instruments



It is a skill set in its own like playing any instrument. It requires just as much practice to get good at.

You have obviously not put in your hours attempting to do so, leaving you with an OPINION as such.
#16
Quote by FireHawk
VST drums sound worse and are more fake than guitar :P Either can sound good with EQing though.




As long as you stay away from things like EZDrummer and Superior Drummer, I disagree. Sampled drums can still sound very good if done correctly, imo. Though real drums are preferable, of course.
#17
Quote by Zeppelin Addict
It is a skill set in its own like playing any instrument. It requires just as much practice to get good at.

You have obviously not put in your hours attempting to do so, leaving you with an OPINION as such.



Actually, I just spent last 2 days in my studio making my new song sound pro, and still not finished
#18
Quote by CrossBack7
As long as you stay away from things like EZDrummer and Superior Drummer, I disagree. Sampled drums can still sound very good if done correctly, imo. Though real drums are preferable, of course.


I should say Amp Sim guitars not fake guitars (fake guitars never sound good. I agree sampling drums (or Battery 3) are the best sounding drums (aside from recording live drums) by far with a little EQing.

Quote by Zeletros
Actually, I just spent last 2 days in my studio making my new song sound pro, and still not finished


2 days isn't much I spend about 60 hours per song in each session (with that said I record everything improve and am a perfectionist). Time doesn't matter though. The people who are real good can make it sound great in no time.
Last edited by FireHawk at Jul 3, 2011,
#19
Quote by Zeletros
Actually, I just spent last 2 days in my studio making my new song sound pro, and still not finished


Oh right.. this studio..

Quote by Zeletros

Let me tell you about my studio.

I have a cheap ass programm and some VSTs= virtual instruments, I use them to make bass and drums, and nearly any other instrument, except guitar and vocals, to make guitar, I got a good microphone that I put near my amp... and that's it...
#21
Hey people. Please this is NOT a mic vs VST thread. It's all subjective and in the.. ear of the beholder. My tastes just happen to lie with the more traditional recording route...

Please can we stay on topic!
#22
You're setup sounds pretty good to me, however is the studio space relatively roomy?
The room you record stuff in is as important as the mixing and production, more so with electric guitars and snare/cymbals i found. Im no expert by FAR on acoustics, but i've heard the results from nearly exactly same setups in different spaces and placements of amps and the raw recording is dramatically different.

Good luck to you, i wish i had my own studio space! One day maybe...
Always waiting for that bit of inspiration.
Last edited by W4T3V3R at Jul 3, 2011,
#23
I'd say my basement is rather roomy... However it's got carpeted floors so that might deaden the room a bit (does it?) Also if need be I can build some homemade reflectors/absorbers to adjust the acoustics of the room
#25
Buy a PC and Cubase 6 and save your money.
I've bought, sold, and traded more gear than I care to admit.
#26
Quote by FireHawk
You do want a basement deadened by carpet as it is to reverby if concrete. Rooms can be either to reverby or to dead.


Pretty much this, reflectors and absorbers *can* be a pain to get to "work" right, but if needed it isnt a whole load of trouble. I'd say its easier to deaden a room than it is to make it more reverby, thin walls suck so a basement is good.

Best judgement is to shout from different points in the room. If it travels well and doesnt come back at you then its fine, if the sound seems to stop as soon as you've closed your mouth then it needs to project more.
Always waiting for that bit of inspiration.
Last edited by W4T3V3R at Jul 4, 2011,
#27
Mic choice and placement can also save a somewhat crappy room.

The closer the microphone, the less room sound you get. Also, you would be less likely to want to use omni mics in a crappy room.

Basically, I would work on a simple setup so that you can single track everything and make it sound good. If you have no band at the moment, I would get good microphones for your guitar and voice and work your technique on those. Don't buy a full mic kit if you won't need all of it for a while. Buy quality and then build your kit around more quality.

Also, you can quite easily get amazing drum sounds with as little as 1 mic, depending on the mic, placement, and technique of the drummer/quality of kit. Don't necessarily think when you buy a drum mic kit that you need to start off with 8 - 12 mics. 4 - 6 will get you results if you know what you're doing.