#1
Hey guys, need a quick explanation of what secondary dominants are.

I just had a friend round who knows his shit, and he was explaining that if you change from G Major to C Major, take the 5th of the chord you're moving to, in this case a C Major, and add it into the G Major before changing chords. Can someone confirm this would be a secondary dominant?
#2
i think a secondary dominant is the major five chord of a certain chord that is the major 5 chord of a particular key.

so if you have C major as the tonic or root chord, then the major five of C would be G major. the secondary dominant would be the major fifth of G, D major.

of course, i was high in class......
"Hey kid. You wanna cigarette?"


"No thanks! I/m already hooked on Fonicks!"

#3
the guy above me is pretty much right--except that its usually a dominant seventh chord, not a major chord. for example, in the progression D7, G7, C the D7 acts as a secondary dominant leading to the G7.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#4
Quote by tehREALcaptain
the guy above me is pretty much right--except that its usually a dominant seventh chord, not a major chord. for example, in the progression D7, G7, C the D7 acts as a secondary dominant leading to the G7.


In jazz, yes, in other genres, not necessarily.

Also TS, a secondary dominant doesn't always signal a modulation, it can strengthen the sense of tonic. Think of it as a stronger II V I.
#5
I would like to add that secondary dominants arent always the dominant of the dominant. They can be the dominant of any other chord like V/ii. Sometimes they're not followed by the new tonic, for example V/ii doesnt have to preceed a ii.
#6
Good comments. The thing I'd add to this, is they can serve different functions within the chord progression itself, for example, DearMoose explained the V/ii, which is different from the V/V, Griff also alluded ti this. This might be a good place to bring up their different functions, in continuing this thread.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jul 4, 2011,