#1
So I've heard the word cadence tossed around and I was wondering what they were.

I'm thinking that they are chord progressions that evoke/create a certain emotion or feeling. Is that right?

If that isn't what they are, then I'm wondering what that is too.

I know about keys and stuff already, just don't know what that is.
#2
This theory book reads, "A cadence is any place in a piece of music that has the feel of an ending. This can be [...] like at the end of a song, or just a movement or section."

Their are multiple types of cadences, the most obvious is a V - I chord progression.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#4
Types of cadences:

Authentic cadence ( V - I )

Perfect Authentic cadence ( V- I with the leading tone rising the tonic in the highest part )

Imperfect cadence ( Any chord - V )

Plagal cadence ( IV - I )

Interrupted cadence ( V - any chord, usually VI )

Phrygian half cadence ( ivb - V)

There's some more which I can't be bothered writing out, Wikipedia cadences
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Jul 3, 2011,
#5
I've heard that there is a Deceptive Cadence where you'll be playing a Major key, and go from the vii to the vi. Am I right?
#6
The word cadence gets thrown around a lot, and, in my view, is pretty useless for the average guitarist. What they are is basically a formula used to end sections in a piece of music (usually from the common practise period ("classical")). It's a certain ending, like V-I with a certain voice leading implied.

I think what people should be doing is explaining the idea of cadential patterns (and maybe this is what they are trying to do, but just throw out the word cadence for no reason). But basically, cadential patterns is the idea of tonic-subdominant-dominant-tonic progressions, most basically seen in I-IV-V-I.
#7
Quote by ChadLikesGuitar
I've heard that there is a Deceptive Cadence where you'll be playing a Major key, and go from the vii to the vi. Am I right?


V - any chord (usually vi), also what someone else said, an interrupted cadence.

Its called deceptive because you think its going to go to a I, but instead it goes somewhere else.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
Last edited by vampirelazarus at Jul 3, 2011,
#8
I learnt that it meant a harmonic progression suggesting a conclusion. Cadence is derived from the latin cado meaning to fall i.e in a perfect cadence you'd be ''falling'' back to the tonic.