#1
What would you practice? I know Pat Metheny and Coltrane has said they used to practice for the majority of the Day. I can't imagine playing scales for 5 hours straight. I feel like it wouldn't be music anymore; your ears would get used to it and it would lose its magic...but maybe that's the sacrifice one must make. What else can one practice besides scales, arpeggios, triads and chords? I have the Mick Goodrick book but it doesn't really tell you "how" to practice, it just gives you material.
#2
Quote by Mlagz
What would you practice? I know Pat Metheny and Coltrane has said they used to practice for the majority of the Day. I can't imagine playing scales for 5 hours straight. I feel like it wouldn't be music anymore; your ears would get used to it and it would lose its magic...but maybe that's the sacrifice one must make. What else can one practice besides scales, arpeggios, triads and chords? I have the Mick Goodrick book but it doesn't really tell you "how" to practice, it just gives you material.


I'd put lots of music on the stereo to play along to and practice 'jamming'.
#3
I'd just play song I like. As long as you're playing, you'll probably get better.
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#5
After about four hours of real serious practice it becomes more a waste of time for most people.
#6
I practice for 26 hours a day and sleep -10 hours. Works for me. And, I practice for 2 hours. Then I also drink a little. And practice sleeping for 8 hours before sleeping. So, practicing is the second thing I do, after I have eaten, by 4 hours. Then of course there is time to sleep. And practice a little in the afternoon, thats all I need. Then sleep and food is also important and I spend Pi/1000 hours on that to be sure. Practice is something I do later, usually in the morning.
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#7
alternate picking chromatics with metronome

sweeping arpeggios (3-5-6 strings)

scales, chords, other theory
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#8
I'm a music major and I peak at around 4 hours during the school year. And that's probably over kill. I really only spend an hour of my time each day doing chords, scales, arpeggios, etc. The rest of it is spent writing, employing the technical knowledge I know, jamming and building repertoire.

No one would practice scales for 5 hours straight, you're much better off spending that time playing with other musicians (of any variety) and learning songs. Not to say practicing technique and knowledge isn't important.
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#9
Quote by TheTee56
I'd just play song I like. As long as you're playing, you'll probably get better.



This, sometimes I just play my favourite song over and over for hours, it's like a trance.
#10
So what the f*ck did pat metheny practice for 30 hours a day?
#11
Quote by Tim the Rocker
I practice for 26 hours a day and sleep -10 hours.

But there's only 24 hours in a day...
#12
I work five days a week and in the evenings that leaves me with only 4 or so hours. I practice for 1 hour 45 minutes and on my days off I do 6 - 7.5 hours of practice. However, I break that down to half an hour sessions and work on various techniques and exercises so that I dont get bored. 10 hours a day practice is very hard to do... Before I went to uni I took a gap year to practice guitar and I tried doing 12 hour days. After about 3 weeks I burned out. I couldnt do it. So I practiced more in less time. I found that most of that 12 hours Id get bored half an hour in and doodle. So instead of practicing a scale for 2 hours, I practiced 4 different scales in 2 hours, each one for half an hour... I wish I could do 12 hour days again though. I havent actually properly practiced in almost 2 years and every time I pick up to play, I suck balls.

(The key to practice is efficient use of time. The more efficient you are, the more you progress).
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#14
In my short experience, I find that I make much bigger leaps in my ability by practicing something different than practicing the same thing over and over again. I'd say anyone will evolve much faster as a musician if they spend 2 hours a day research new material (new lessons, music theory, new musics, learning how the instrument works and so on) and spend 2 hours a day training what they learned in the other 2 hours than if they spend those 4 hours hacking away at the guitar with what they already know as a background.

More often than not I'll try to play a given riff or solo and fail (lol), then I'll go on to something different, hard to do or not, practical or theoretical, then the next week I'll try the same riff or solo again and I'll have a much MUCH easier time than before. Recent example is the battery riff, the gallop type thingy hetfield does is basic but it requires dexterity and precision in reasonable amounts. For a DIYS guitarist with one month of experience, it's pretty hard. So I researched the basics behind the gallop riff, spent two hours doing it (while watching television, in my instance), went to sleep (SLEEPING IS VERY IMPORTANT, specially if you get used to playing at least 15 minutes before you go to sleep, also try to play something you have problems doing, you'll sleep over it and the next day it'll be imprinted into your mind. Learning the fretboard this way is fantastically effective and easy, sleeping is really awesome), and then the next day I could do it much better. Still not perfect, but that will come with time, time spent doing something else. I usually practice the Count of Tuscany riff, which is fantastically beautiful and HARD, and that helps. I'm also much better at it.

In essence, the key is to always do something new. Doing something over and over is mostly for the basics, like learning the fretboard or music theory. In that sense, scales are important but you need to mix them up so you know where they are, what they are supposed to do and all that. Hand dexterity (left and right) and precision comes with doing something different, and trying to do it well. Try a different riff with a different rhythm, but you'll need to spend time researching. Don't fear though: it's time well spent. Training smart ALWAYS beats training hard. Though I prefer training smart AND hard if I have the time.
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#15
If I had to, I'd spend the time writing and jamming out songs with a friend/bandmate. I bet I could write and get together some decent songs in 10 hours.
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#16
Quote by SlackerBabbath
I'd put lots of music on the stereo to play along to and practice 'jamming'.

Since when do you post here??

I practice the majority of the day in the sense that I pretty much spend every waking moment just immersing myself in music. I'm either practicing, reading, writing, or listening to music. But it is not to get better, really. It is simply because I enjoy it so much
#17
Unfortunately, I do not always get the chance to practice daily. I work 24 hours at a time, with 48 hours off (of which 16+ hours is taken up with a second job). When I do get a chance to practice (days off of my primary job on weekends), it's typically 2-4 hours. I'll do some warm-ups with simpler songs, then move on to more complex songs/techniques, and usually spend the last hour or so of practice to learn something new. On days when I have more than just a couple of hours, I try to write new stuff or expand upon a work in progress...this may explain why almost everything I've written is still a work in progress (even after 2+ years of writing).

One thing I've yet to accomplish is working around/through the brick wall. I'm thinking more study time in theory will aid me here.
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#18
if you could? I do!
I just do exercises, warm up's, play lots of songs, scale and mode work, chord work, then improvising. in no order really. But usually playing songs or warming up first. Then songwriting, but I just do that anyways, when I'm not playing.
#19
alot of the best guitarists in the world have many times in interviews said they practiced 20 hours a day,its hard to believe but they do it.
#20
Actually playing your instrument or doing something related to your music for the majority of the day isn't so far-fetched, but the idea of actually using that time to do some serious practicing (and not just noodling) is insane. After 2-4 hours you can not get any more out of your practice and even risk injuring yourself I think.
#21
Quote by StormLexer
But there's only 24 hours in a day...




I'd probably practice technical shit, scales and the like, for about an hour before giving up. I find I improve more by playing with other musicians than by playing scales over and over for hours