#1
Hey guys,
Well lets take a F chord for an example,
1st fret E string= F
3rd fret A string=C
And maybe even 3rd fret D string= F

So does that mean I can also call a F chord a C chord?

please help
#2
Quote by GV8
Hey guys,
Well lets take a F chord for an example,
1st fret E string= F
3rd fret A string=C
And maybe even 3rd fret D string= F

So does that mean I can also call a F chord a C chord?

please help


There's only two notes present, so there's technically no chord here. However this could be considered an F5 voicing. Otherwise F is not in a C chord so that wouldn't work.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#3
You have just stated 2 notes, F & C
So it's a 5th chord: C being the 5th of the F Major scale
F G A Bb C D E

So no, the chord is an F5

A C5 would have the notes C & G
C D E F G A B

Edit:// Alan HB has a good point that you should know.
5th chords (powerchords) are not considered as 'proper' chords.

A chord is 3 notes or more.
Last edited by SumFX at Jul 4, 2011,
#4
you cant, because:

the notes of F major chord are: F, A, C
and
the notes of F minor chord are: F, G#, C

but
the notes of C major chord are: C, E, G
and
the notes of C minor chord are: C, D#, G
#5
Quote by tiammetadeth
you cant, because:

the notes of F major chord are: F, A, C
and
the notes of F minor chord are: F, G#, C

but
the notes of C major chord are: C, E, G
and
the notes of C minor chord are: C, D#, G

No, Ab and Eb, not G# and D#. Quite a difference I'm afraid.
#6
Quote by tiammetadeth
you cant, because:

the notes of F major chord are: F, A, C
and
the notes of F minor chord are: F, Ab, C

but
the notes of C major chord are: C, E, G
and
the notes of C minor chord are: C, Eb, G

Just about right, but I've bolded the correct enharmonic equivalents for these situations. To write a G# from F, and a D# from C would imply augmented seconds; for the intervals to be considered a third of any kind, the letter name must be three away from the tonic, so Ab for Fm and Eb for Cm are the correct minor thirds for this function.

EDIT: Wow, MT really springs on enharmonic equivalence something-savage.
Last edited by juckfush at Jul 4, 2011,
#8
Quote by tiammetadeth
you cant, because:

the notes of F major chord are: F, A, C
and
the notes of F minor chord are: F, G#, C

but
the notes of C major chord are: C, E, G
and
the notes of C minor chord are: C, D#, G



Pleeeease don't try to answer questions if you're going to spell your chords incorrectly.
-------------

Long story short, you stack in THIRDS. Most "chords" that we are speaking of are "triads" which are chords composed of three notes. If you have the collection of notes A C and F you would stack those in thirds, regardless of quality (major/minor), so F A C. This also applies to 7ths and ESPECIALLY 9ths, 11ths and 13ths. You then label it by the lowest note which is called the root. We could get into an explanation of the overtone series and why the F actually is acoustically the root but for right now all you need to know is that the bottom of a stack of thirds (except in a fully diminished 7th) is considered the root and that's how you determine the chord name.

To correct the above,
F major: FAC
F minor: F Ab C <--- They're still stacked in thirds, the first one just happens to be a minor third.

C major: CEG
C minor: C Eb G. Same deal.
Having a D# there would be spelling it as an augmented 2nd. Who wants that?

EDIT: Damn you all, shouldn't have typed so much.
Winner of the 2011 Virginia Guitar Festival

Protools HD
Lynx Aurora 16/HD192
Mojave, Sennheiser, AKG, EV etc mics
Focusrite ISA828 pres
Waves Mercury
Random Rack Gear

65 Deluxe Reverb
PRS CE 22
American Standard Strat
Taylor 712
Last edited by Artemis Entreri at Jul 4, 2011,
#10
Are you sure? The chord is usually named after the root.

And... I'm not going to bother with giving out information since so many have already...

are we allowed to confuse people with inversions before they are ready?
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#11
Quote by GV8
Hey guys,
Well lets take a F chord for an example,
1st fret E string= F
3rd fret A string=C
And maybe even 3rd fret D string= F

So does that mean I can also call a F chord a C chord?

please help


Learn music theory - triads and extended chords. Without it, you won't have the foundation. With it, it's a piece of cake every time. There's no workaround to it. This is a question that can only be answered with more training, unless someone wants to take it upon themselves to write a long extended dialogue with you, but even then if you don't do the work, it's mostly futile.

Best,

Sean
#13
Quote by Sean0913
Learn music theory - triads and extended chords. Without it, you won't have the foundation. With it, it's a piece of cake every time. There's no workaround to it. This is a question that can only be answered with more training, unless someone wants to take it upon themselves to write a long extended dialogue with you, but even then if you don't do the work, it's mostly futile.

Best,

Sean


This is the best advice here. In practice, a chord will not always have all tones present. Of course the notes F and C could be present in some kinf of C chord as F has a relationship to C just as the opposite is true.

learning how chords are built is paramount to understanding how to identify them.
Andy