#1
What is the weirdest scale you know well and how to play?

I'm learning the Gowleeswari Scale.

It is P1, m2, P4, m6, P8/octave.

Just thought it was an interesting scale.
#4
The harmonic major scale is about as weird as scales can get.

As a clarification it isnt so much the scale that is weird about it but the harmonies you create around it are pretty neat.
Last edited by Vlasco at Jul 4, 2011,
#8
Anything non-Western is almost automatically 'weirder' than anything we'll discuss in our system. Firstly, they use intervals foreign to us, and secondly, they have a much bigger scope for variation. For example, every single scale mentioned so far ends up with a perfect 'octave,' whereas many Indonesian and Indian scales don't come anywhere close. Read about Gamelan tunings for something seriously interesting that isn't too hard to understand.
Quote by metal4all
Just, no. Locrian should be treated like that gay cousin. Just avoid him cuz he's weird, unstable, and is attracted to the wrong thing.


Quote by steven seagull
Big deal, I bought a hamster once and they put that in a box...doesn't make it a scale.
#11
Quote by LolCatGuitar
locrian dominant with a maj7

p,1 m2, M3, p4, b5, m6, M7, p8


What's a minor 2? Isn't a dominant supposed to have a dominant 7th? That way of writing scales is really annoying.

Is it meant to be this?

1, 2, 3, 4, b5, b6, 7
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#12
Quote by AlanHB
What's a minor 2? Isn't a dominant supposed to have a dominant 7th? That way of writing scales is really annoying.

Is it meant to be this?

1, 2, 3, 4, b5, b6, 7


1, b2, 3, 4, b5, b6, 7 I think.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#13
Quote by AlanHB
What's a minor 2? Isn't a dominant supposed to have a dominant 7th? That way of writing scales is really annoying.

Is it meant to be this?

1, 2, 3, 4, b5, b6, 7


I never ever ever in college had a teacher write or say "flat" fifth, second, etc. I can flatten three different notes, and have none of them be a "flat" note. It is misleading to say that, minor second or m2 is the proper way to label it. I am pretty sure I am misreading your comment though, lol.
#14
Quote by greeneyegat
The Chromatic Scale?


Lol, you beat me too it
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Well played, sir, well played.
#15
Quote by yM.Samurai
Anything non-Western is almost automatically 'weirder' than anything we'll discuss in our system. Firstly, they use intervals foreign to us, and secondly, they have a much bigger scope for variation. For example, every single scale mentioned so far ends up with a perfect 'octave,' whereas many Indonesian and Indian scales don't come anywhere close. Read about Gamelan tunings for something seriously interesting that isn't too hard to understand.


yeah anyone who hasn't should check out gamelan tuning. while we look at wierd scales, that's still a very western way of looking at things, with all things being equal within the octaves.

in gamelan, the notes are what we might call out of tune. the higher the note, the closer the interval, the lower the note, the more the difference in pitch. then when you play, they will play these notes together, as the same note, and it will cause vibrations or dissonance, which will be different depending on where the note lies in the harmonic series. very cool stuff, and a great, great sound.

also check out gagaku, japanese court music, in which silence is more important than the notes in between, the total antithesis of western thought. these are weird. cramming the hungarian minor into a western major/minor system isn't really imo.
#16
Quote by ElConky
I never ever ever in college had a teacher write or say "flat" fifth, second, etc. I can flatten three different notes, and have none of them be a "flat" note. It is misleading to say that, minor second or m2 is the proper way to label it. I am pretty sure I am misreading your comment though, lol.


If you flatten a sharp note, you get a natural. Just because it doesn't have flat in the name doesn't mean it's not flattened. I see your point, though: it's important to have some sort of uniformity for the sake of communication.

The 'm2, M3' way is appropriate for approaching each scale as a separate (but equal) identity. The way that Alan and I used is justified for comparison to the major scale; given the way in which Western tonal musicians regard the major scale, I feel that it is a completely acceptable approach.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#17
Quote by ElConky
I never ever ever in college had a teacher write or say "flat" fifth, second, etc. I can flatten three different notes, and have none of them be a "flat" note. It is misleading to say that, minor second or m2 is the proper way to label it. I am pretty sure I am misreading your comment though, lol.


As mentioned above, it's standard formulae in relation to the major scale. As for the second, consider that a "minor second" is exactly the same as a "major second".
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#18
Quote by AlanHB
As mentioned above, it's standard formulae in relation to the major scale. As for the second, consider that a "minor second" is exactly the same as a "major second".


I think you're a little confuzzled. A minor second refers to a half-step interval while a major second refers to a whole step. When I first started learning scalar intervals, I thought the second would be considered a perfect interval--as the major and minor scales both had the same one--but I later found out that it is not.

Long story short, the m2, M2 is in regards to the distance of a minor/major second interval and not the 2nd interval from the major/minor scale.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#19
D- Ebb Diminished 2nd
D - Eb - Minor second
D - E major second
D - E# augmented 2nd
D - Ex doubly augmented 2nd
#21
Quote by soviet_ska
I think you're a little confuzzled. A minor second refers to a half-step interval while a major second refers to a whole step. When I first started learning scalar intervals, I thought the second would be considered a perfect interval--as the major and minor scales both had the same one--but I later found out that it is not.

Long story short, the m2, M2 is in regards to the distance of a minor/major second interval and not the 2nd interval from the major/minor scale.


Oh I see, it's interval length. It's still pretty annoying.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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