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#1
So the traditional English language is being replaced by many Americianisms. I like to listen to older people who use a lot of older phrases like 'hit the deck', 'ill be there with bells on' 'give it some welly', 'sling your hook' etc.

What do you think of the Americianisation of the English language, and which phrases are you fond of?
Last edited by Sir-Shredalot at Jul 4, 2011,
#5
Jings crivens help ma bob


My dad says that, he's scottish so I assume its a scottish phrase but he's the only person I've ever heard say that.
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#6
Quote by funeralllllllll
i think you're confusing old fashioned language with contemporary cockney / essex slang tbh



Huh?!? I think you are confusing 'contemporary cockney / essex slang' with British 19th century Nautical expressions.

1. Getting your own back (getting even or having revenge)
If the wind was blowing in the wrong direction when using the toilets (or ‘heads&rsquo on a ship you would ‘get your own back’.

2. Be at loggerheads (arguing)
A loggerhead was a round iron ball at the end of long handle that was used to heat pitch (a type of sticky tar) for sealing deck planks. Arguing sailors often used loggerheads as weapons.

3. Sling your hook (go away)
What one sailor might say to another in the next hammock wanting him to move elsewhere, to sling his hammock somewhere else.

4. Pipe down (Stop talking)
The boatswain piped a signal at the end of the day for lights out and silence.

5. At the sharp end (in danger)
At the bows of the ship, ie at the front.
#7
Quote by 剣 斧 血
Jings crivens help ma bob


My dad says that, he's scottish so I assume its a scottish phrase but he's the only person I've ever heard say that.


Billy Connelly says that, so I presume it's scottish.

And yeah, they are more local slang then old fashioned language. You are thinking of stereotypical Victorian Britain.

^They probably have a lot of Nautical terms in their slang because of the dock workers, but I don't know fo' sho'.
Last edited by benonbass1 at Jul 4, 2011,
#9
Quote by Sir-Shredalot
What do you think of the Americianisation of the English language, and of which phrases are you fond?

Fixed for preposition stranding. American grammar is something up with which a true Englishman will never put.
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#10
I, for one, greatly disapprove of the Americanisation. It's becoming English for simple folk.

I'm fond of trousers and aluminium and films and pavements and CHIPS! Real damn chips that one pisses me off.
#11
- If I'm honest I don't have much of an issue with Americans using words like "Highway" or "Sidewalk" as they're pretty much synonyms.
- It does annoy me a little when english words are changed like "Math" or "Color"
- What really ticks me off is the pronunciation (butchering) of words like "Presentation" or "Moscow" (although technically that's Russian anyway)

EDIT: if you watch the Inbetweeners a lot of the insults on there are typically english
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Last edited by Emperor's Child at Jul 4, 2011,
#12
Quote by Sir-Shredalot
Huh?!? I think you are confusing 'contemporary cockney / essex slang' with British 19th century Nautical expressions.



was lucky enough to live in a pub in romford a little while ago, must be docks nearby

they kept calling me a "can't" all the time i don't know if thats a nautical term
#13
Quote by 剣 斧 血
Jings crivens help ma bob


My dad says that, he's scottish so I assume its a scottish phrase but he's the only person I've ever heard say that.

It's Scottish. Jings and crivens are just like "Oh jeez". I wish I knew what "Help ma boab!" meant though

The ones in the OP are all fairly used in Scotland still btw. Maybe not so much the bells one.
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#14
pretty sure "help me a bob" means "give me a hand"
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#15
Quote by funeralllllllll


was lucky enough to live in a pub in romford a little while ago, must be docks nearby

they kept calling me a "can't" all the time i don't know if thats a nautical term



Sounds like theyre calling you a c*nt with an accent...
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#16
Quote by Emperor's Child
- If I'm honest I don't have much of an issue with Americans using words like "Highway" or "Sidewalk" as they're pretty much synonyms.
- It does annoy me a little when english words are changed like "Math" or "Color"
- What really ticks me off is the pronunciation (butchering) of words like "Presentation" or "Moscow" (although technically that's Russian anyway)

how in the world do you pronounce Moss-cow or present-(n)ation differently?

And Moscow isn't Russian, the Russians call it Mosskva.
#17
Quote by CoreysMonster
how in the world do you pronounce Moss-cow or present-(n)ation differently?

And Moscow isn't Russian, the Russians call it Mosskva.


Pre-sen-ta-tion

Prez-en-ta-tion
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#18
Cos' kick a bow agains' a wow n 'ed eet 'till the bost it?
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#19
Quote by guitarlord28
Pre-sen-ta-tion

Prez-en-ta-tion

I pronounce it preh-zen-tay-shun

I hate hearing it pre-zen-tay-shun.
#20
Fag = Cigarette and Faggot= Meat or sticks, not a gay man.


Quote by CoreysMonster
how in the world do you pronounce Moss-cow or present-(n)ation differently?

And Moscow isn't Russian, the Russians call it Mosskva.


Rather than Mos-cow, as in the animal, it's Mos-co, spelled and pronounced like the end of show.
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Last edited by SlipknotRule93 at Jul 4, 2011,
#21
Quote by WholeLottaIzzy
I pronounce it preh-zen-tay-shun

I hate hearing it pre-zen-tay-shun.

Can't be as bad as hearing an them say 'aloominum'
Periphery, love that shit!
#23
Quote by AvengedESP
Can't be as bad as hearing an them say 'aloominum'

You're right. That's pretty disgusting. It's probably one that annoys me the most.
#25
Also Alan Sugar saying resume rather than CV and pronouncing it wrong in the process.
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#27
When someone says something about themselves which is meant to provide a boost to themselves, such as:

"I'm better than Jimi Hendrix lulz!"

The reply is "yea and you woke up chewing your pillow"


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#28
Mos - Cow
Mos - Co

And when I said it was Russian I meant the original word is Russian and not English, so we don't pronounce it the same
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Last edited by Emperor's Child at Jul 4, 2011,
#30
Quote by SlipknotRule93
Rather than Mos-cow, as in the animal, it's Mos-co, spelled and pronounced like the end of show.

Now that's just silly. I don't know of any other language that pronounces it any way other than Moss-cow.

proof that Germans also pronounce it Moss-cow: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CzycFeqNxIA
#32
Away with ya ya buftie!

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#34
Thankfully a lot of Americanisms haven't made their way into Lancashire, cause I love they old Lanc folk speak. It was as if my Grandad spoke a different language.
#36
Quote by AvengedESP
Can't be as bad as hearing an them say 'aloominum'


I abhor that.


"Queer as a clockwork orange" is one, if I'm to believe Burgess
#37
Quote by TheBurningFish
It's Scottish. Jings and crivens are just like "Oh jeez". I wish I knew what "Help ma boab!" meant though

The ones in the OP are all fairly used in Scotland still btw. Maybe not so much the bells one.


Other than 'jings' (which ma wee granny used tae say), I've never heard 'crivens' or 'help ma boab' actually used. Where they invented for Oor Wullie, or what?
#38
Quote by 23dannybhoy23
Other than 'jings' (which ma wee granny used tae say), I've never heard 'crivens' or 'help ma boab' actually used. Where they invented for Oor Wullie, or what?

A dinnae ken, but jings and crivens are used in Terry Pratchett's Wee Free Men books. "Help ma boab!" was written on a piece of paper with a lateral thinking puzzle on it in my maths class (The question was "What word do Scottish people always pronounce loudly?" just so you know that it wasn't weird and contextless) and I haven't seen or heard it anywhere else.
The UG Awards exist only to instill me with existential doubt.


For me, the 60's ended that day in 1978...

Willies. Fuck the lick and fuck you too.
#39
"Put ' plug in ' 'ole" - Shut the door.
"'ow do?" - How are you?
"Chuffed" - Pleased
" Me sen" - Myself
" Ah can'' be doin' wi' this ... lark" - I can't be doing with this ... activity

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Last edited by cam_sampbell at Jul 4, 2011,
#40
Quote by cam_sampbell
"Put ' plug in ' 'ole" - Shut the door.
"'ow do?" - How are you?
"Chuffed" - Pleased
" Me sen" - Myself
" Ah can'' be doin' wi' this ... lark" - I can't be doing with this ... activity

I love being a Yorkshireman


Ey up, Ars thee then kidda?
You born in a barn?
Goin darn chip oil, wan owt?
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