#1
So before my family's trip, I bought some new Martin strings, and had my little sister, who just started playing guitar a year ago, change my strings for practice. Well, she messed up on the b string, it just sounds flat no matter what I do. Is there any way I could use and extra high E string and tune it in replacement of the B? Please help! :/
#2
Sounds flat always?

Why don't you just take off the string and re-string it? Tried stretching it in?
Quote by Blompcube
it's so cool to hate Gibson, even the federal Department of Justice hates them.

( )( )
( . .) This is Bunny. Copy and paste Bunny into your
C('')('') signature to help him gain world domination.
#3
Okay ragingkitty, I will try that. Thanks. Ha, it may sound like a silly question, but I've been playing for quite a while and still clueless on the maintenance side of guitars..-_-
#4
Maybe buy a new string? I know most guitar shops carry singles. Sounds like it could be an action problem too.
Quote by cm880999
Not fast enough.. try playing this song i wrote it's called trolls delight!

heres the progression

A F Bb Gm E C D A Bm C Bm A Bm Bb Bm Cm Cb C Cbm A

played at 883 bmp change the chord every click

its pretty easy though
#5
Sounds like it's slipping. Assuming she didn't trim it really short, try removing and reinstalling, locking it correctly at the tuner. Otherwise, try one of the online string dealers, and buy a single string as well as a couple of new sets for spares.
PRS SC245
Various Strats
Polytone Mini Brute
Koch Studiotone XL
Quilter OD200, 101 Reverb and Mini
1958 National lap steel
Eastman El Rey 1
#6
Quote by Vulcan
Sounds like it's slipping. Assuming she didn't trim it really short, try removing and reinstalling, locking it correctly at the tuner.


That could be a possibility... if that is the case TS, do you know the "locking wrap" approach?

1. String the string in from the bridge as per normal.
2. Ensure the tuning peg hole is parallel with the neck
3. String the string through the peg, leaving some slack in the string, and a space of 1" after the string comes out from the tuning peg.
4. Take the extra length, bend it back towards the neck.
5. Feed the extra length under the part the part of the string which goes into the peg
6. If you tune up counter clockwise, you need to ensure that you're bending the string back on the left side. If you tune up clockwise, then the string should bend on the right side.
7. Take the string length and blend under and then up a right angle under the string - this ensures that when you tune up, your string will grip the extra length so that the tension from the string will lock the extra length of string in place preventing slippage.

I think my instructions aren't easy to follow... I think there's a tutorial somewhere on UG or on the web... but I can't find it now.
Quote by Blompcube
it's so cool to hate Gibson, even the federal Department of Justice hates them.

( )( )
( . .) This is Bunny. Copy and paste Bunny into your
C('')('') signature to help him gain world domination.
#7
Thanks, ragingkitty, I can only attempt to describe it for a slotted peghead and nylon strings, not steel. I use nothing but lockers on my steel string guitars.
PRS SC245
Various Strats
Polytone Mini Brute
Koch Studiotone XL
Quilter OD200, 101 Reverb and Mini
1958 National lap steel
Eastman El Rey 1