#1
hello all, i just start sing lessons and have been using guitar pro to figure out vocal melodys but some of them have two notes that sound correct but as some of you may know you cant sing more than one note at a time, such as an E and C, D and B and others. my question is do these notes some how equal a single note, thanks
#2
Not sure I understand the question, but if I do, then you mean does singing C and E = D?

Because I don't think they do..
133 18 9463 8395 24 22 8358 4939
#3
im guessing that one of the notes is the main voice while the other is a backup singer or a harmony. two vocal tracks are recorded either by the same vocalist or two vocalists that harmonise together.

some people put the two voices into two separate "tracks" within guitar pro, while other people put them in one "track"
#4
In places where you hear more than one note, you'll have harmonising going on. So in short, multiple notes do not equal one note. Interestingly, this also applies to question marks.
Last edited by EL2T at Jul 5, 2011,
#5
Do you mean vocal harmonies? For example, where one voice is singing a C and another voice is singing a D at the same time?
#7
no they are one voice, but it is written out as two notes playing together and a singer can only sing one note at a time, so i am asking if two notes somehow an extension of one.
#9
Quote by RyanBreslin
no they are one voice, but it is written out as two notes playing together and a singer can only sing one note at a time, so i am asking if two notes somehow an extension of one.


No, what is happening there is that the notes are invoking a chordal idea. For example if you have one note that is C, and the other is Eb, then it is invoking a C minor triad, even though the 5th of that Cm is not present, the Eb with the C implies a Minor triad. If it were C E, then you have the Root (C), and a Major 3rd, so that chord implied in the melody is likely C Major.

In short, one note is harmonizing the other implying a chord within the song key.

And, you can't sing two notes with one person simultaneous without an artificial means, because the human voice is monophonic, not polyphonic. So choose the note that best feels like the melody in that instance.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jul 5, 2011,
#12
Quote by Sean0913
No, what is happening there is that the notes are invoking a chordal idea. For example if you have one note that is C, and the other is Eb, then it is invoking a C minor triad, even though the 5th of that Cm is not present, the Eb with the C implies a Minor triad. If it were C E, then you have the Root (C), and a Major 3rd, so that chord implied in the melody is likely C Major.

In short, one note is harmonizing the other implying a chord within the song key.

And, you can't sing two notes with one person simultaneous without an artificial means, because the human voice is monophonic, not polyphonic. So choose the note that best feels like the melody in that instance.

Best,

Sean

This. The harmony is just deceptively placed on one track which can lead you into thinking that you have to sing chords. That's not it. There are just two melody lines in the single track. You're probably best off just singing the lowest notes.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3