#1
Hi all!

I'm trying to learn this song by August Burns Red, but having a little trouble with the sweeping. I know how to do the sweep but when i get to the tap it isnt very loud.

are you supposed to mute the strings as you go? or is it guitar/amp issue? (using a laguna starter pack with 15 watt Line 6 lol)
#2
Well taps in general have less volume than picked notes, but it improves as you work on the finger strength. Practice your tapping. But what do you when you ask if you have to mute strings as you go? Do you let them ring out as you sweep? Because that's just playing a chord.
Quote by Danusta
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#3
Quote by mike_biro727
Well taps in general have less volume than picked notes, but it improves as you work on the finger strength. Practice your tapping. But what do you when you ask if you have to mute strings as you go? Do you let them ring out as you sweep? Because that's just playing a chord.

like do you palm mute string for string after picking them?
#4
Quote by emmicKs
like do you palm mute string for string after picking them?


Oh, okay. When sweeping the idea is to lift your fingers slightly to stop the note from ringing. It might help to look up some lessons on sweeping, there is a great one in the lesson section of this website.
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#5
Quote by emmicKs
like do you palm mute string for string after picking them?


To quote the great Guthrie Govan: any spare piece of flesh on your hand should really be keeping all the strings you don't want to sound quiet.
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#6
well do you think my equipment might be the problem? i mean its the cheapest of the cheapest. I know how to sweep pick just i have to really hit the note hard for it to sound. like my pickup's doesn't pick up the noise it needs to with me just taping
#7
Quote by emmicKs
well do you think my equipment might be the problem? i mean its the cheapest of the cheapest. I know how to sweep pick just i have to really hit the note hard for it to sound. like my pickup's doesn't pick up the noise it needs to with me just taping


No. I spent some of this weekend just gone playing a £200 guitar with 11s in standard and my tapping was working just fine. It's not as easy as with good equipment or thinner strings but it's quite possible with strong enough technique.
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#8
Bad gear will make playing well difficult. However, you shouldn't rely on it as the sole explanation for why you're having trouble playing. Keep learning and try to make sure you're using good technique. You need to learn good muting technique. If your amp is naturally hissy, try to do everything you can to minimize that hiss when practicing.
#10
His technique is better than yours. Simple.

Also, if you're trying to learn to tap... don't do it while trying to learn to sweep as well, I'm all for stretching yourself but that is not at all easy even if you can do both already.
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#11
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
His technique is better than yours. Simple.

Also, if you're trying to learn to tap... don't do it while trying to learn to sweep as well, I'm all for stretching yourself but that is not at all easy even if you can do both already.

Pretty much this. If you can't tap and you can't sweep, don't bother learning to sweep tap. It's very doable for someone who is familiar with both techniques, but they're challenging enough on their own that you really shouldn't attempt both at once. It's not going to be easy and you will get very frustrated, especially if your gear can't keep up with what you want it to do.
#12
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
No. I spent some of this weekend just gone playing a £200 guitar with 11s in standard and my tapping was working just fine.

I feel like theres a specific reason that the tapping was easy on that guitar....

@TS
dude its not the gear that sucks, its you. That having been said, that tool you linked to totally has what look like very high output pickups. so his amp probably does some pretty significant clipping, which gives a compressed sound which makes it sound like his taps are a loud as his picks.

so here is the advices for you. Practice better technique, dime your gain, maybe invest in a kompressor.
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#13
Quote by kolonelkadat
I feel like theres a specific reason that the tapping was easy on that guitar....

@TS
dude its not the gear that sucks, its you. That having been said, that tool you linked to totally has what look like very high output pickups. so his amp probably does some pretty significant clipping, which gives a compressed sound which makes it sound like his taps are a loud as his picks.

so here is the advices for you. Practice better technique, dime your gain, maybe invest in a kompressor.


It wasn't the 11s, I'm used to playing 9s in standard and with much lower action than on that guitar.

And if you're trying to get strong tapping, don't dime the gain, the natural compression of a gain sound will lie to you about how strong your fingers are.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

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#14
I still think its the 11s mate. its so much easier to drive bigger sounds out of bigger strings than it is to try and drive a big sound out of a small string. but im not going to argue with you, because you are better than me, and im not going to pretend for even one second that you arent.

as for diming the gain, I didnt mean to imply he should use gain while practicing, although it is super helpful for showing you exactly how terrible your muting abilities are ;p
"When losers say it's over with you know that it's a lie
The gods made heavy metal and it's never gonna die"
#15
When you become proficient at a technique, the gauge of the strings will not create a large difference in your playing. I can tap equally well on every string on each of my guitars. The gauge of the strings makes little to no difference to me. If you're bad at a technique, blaming string gauge for it is about the last thing I'd blame for that lack of proficiency. Could you at least imply that it's his pickups that made him good at tapping? At least that would be more realistic an accusation.

Side question: Does diming the gain mean set it to 10 (all the way up) or about 10% up? I've always been a little hazy on how that phrase is used.
#16
if there was no difference in sound between light and heavy gauges, no one would use heavy gauges. Now maybe its down to a difference in the neck and body woods because my guitar with 9s has never seen a gauge heavier than 10s, and my guitar with 13s has only once seen a gauge lighter than 13s, and I have no idea what either of them have as a body wood. but between the two, there is a very noticeable difference in tone, timbre, and volume between the two. And I have to think, man if I didnt absolutely fall in love with the way 13s played and sounded, why the heck would I still be using 13s for standard tuning?

to dime a knob is to set it to 10. although 10% is a very interesting way to interpret it.
"When losers say it's over with you know that it's a lie
The gods made heavy metal and it's never gonna die"
#17
Quote by kolonelkadat
if there was no difference in sound between light and heavy gauges, no one would use heavy gauges. Now maybe its down to a difference in the neck and body woods because my guitar with 9s has never seen a gauge heavier than 10s, and my guitar with 13s has only once seen a gauge lighter than 13s, and I have no idea what either of them have as a body wood. but between the two, there is a very noticeable difference in tone, timbre, and volume between the two. And I have to think, man if I didnt absolutely fall in love with the way 13s played and sounded, why the heck would I still be using 13s for standard tuning?

to dime a knob is to set it to 10. although 10% is a very interesting way to interpret it.

Most people I know prefer playing on heavier strings because they tune lower than e standard. I didn't say that a player won't feel the difference between playing on different gauge strings. What I said was that for a technique like tapping, on two guitars with different gauge strings, a proficient player shouldn't notice any difference in how well he plays between the two. Obviously, there is a feel difference and a player will almost certainly have a preference for his string gauge, but a skilled player shouldn't notice too much difference in how *well* he plays on different gauges, only preference.

Side note: when I encountered the term "dime the knob", I was first getting used to PodFarm, which allows you to control exact percentages of various knobs, hence my confusion. To the software, to dime a knob would be to set it to 100%.